S-4/A
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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 2, 2021

Registration Statement No. 333-258681

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Amendment No. 3

to

Form S-4

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   6770   86-1888095

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

2744 Sand Hill Road, Suite 100

Menlo Park, CA 94025

(212) 993-0076

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of Registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III

2744 Sand Hill Road, Suite 100

Menlo Park, CA 94025

Attention: Peter Haskopoulos

Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Secretary

(212) 993-0076

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

 

Copies to:

 

E. Ramey Layne

Vinson & Elkins L.L.P.

1001 Fannin Street

Suite 2500

Houston, TX 77002

(713) 758-2222

 

Douglas Campbell

Solid Power, Inc.

486 S. Pierce Avenue

Suite E

Louisville, CO 80027

(303) 219-0720

 

Robert O’Connor

Mark B. Baudler

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati P.C.

One Market Plaza, Spear Tower, Suite 3300

San Francisco, CA 94105

(415) 947-2000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale of the securities to the public:

As soon as practicable after this Registration Statement becomes effective and on completion of the business combination described in the enclosed proxy statement/prospectus.

If the securities being registered on this Form are being offered in connection with the formation of a holding company and there is compliance with General Instruction G, check the following box.  ☐

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  
Non-accelerated filer      Smaller reporting company  
     Emerging growth company  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.  ☐

If applicable, place an X in the box to designate the appropriate rule provision relied upon in conducting this transaction:

Exchange Act Rule 13e-4(i) (Cross-Border Issuer Tender Offer)  ☐

Exchange Act Rule 14d-1(d) (Cross-Border Third-Party Tender Offer)  ☐

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of Securities

to be Registered

 

Amount

to be

Registered(1)(2)

 

Proposed

Maximum

Offering Price

per Share

 

Proposed

Maximum

Aggregate

Offering Price(3)

 

Amount of

Registration Fee(4)(5)

Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share

  139,161,127   N/A   $1,467,454,084.22   $136,032.99

 

 

 

(1)

Based on the maximum number of shares of Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class A Common Stock”), of the registrant estimated to be issued or issuable upon exchange and exercise of all Solid Power Options and Solid Power Warrants (each defined below) in connection with the merger described herein (the “Merger”), assuming an exchange ratio of 3.1873 shares of Class A Common Stock for each share of the common stock of Solid Power, Inc. (“Solid Power”) expected to be outstanding at the closing of the Merger. The estimated exchange ratio calculated herein is based upon Solid Power’s capitalization as of October 31, 2021. The number of shares of Class A Common Stock issued or issuable in the Merger will be adjusted to account for changes in Solid Power’s capitalization prior to the closing of the Merger.

(2)

Pursuant to Rule 416 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), there are also being registered such additional shares of Class A Common Stock that may be issued because of events such as recapitalizations, stock dividends, stock splits, and reverse stock splits, and similar transactions.

(3)

Pursuant to Rules 457(c) and 457(f)(1) promulgated under the Securities Act, and solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee, the proposed maximum aggregate offering price is an amount equal to $1,467,454,084.22, calculated as the product of (i) 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock, the estimated maximum number of shares of Class A Common Stock that may be issued or be issuable in the Merger, and (ii) $10.545, the average of the high and low trading prices of the Class A Common Stock on October 27, 2021.

(4)

Calculated pursuant to Rule 457 under the Securities Act by calculating the product of (i) the proposed maximum aggregate offering price and (ii) 0.0000927.

(5)

Previously paid.

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, or until this Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information in this preliminary proxy statement/prospectus is not complete and may be changed. The securities described herein may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is declared effective. This preliminary proxy statement/prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

PRELIMINARY PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS—SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED NOVEMBER 2, 2021

DECARBONIZATION PLUS ACQUISITION CORPORATION III

 

 

Dear Stockholders of Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III:

You are cordially invited to attend the special meeting (the “special meeting”) of stockholders of Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III (“DCRC,” “we,” “our,” “us” or the “Company”), which will be held at 10:00 a.m., Eastern time, on December 7, 2021, via live webcast at the following address: https://www.cstproxy.com/decarbonizationplusacquisitioniii/2021. At the special meeting, DCRC stockholders will be asked to consider and vote upon the following proposals:

 

   

The Business Combination Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to (a) approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, dated as of June 15, 2021 (as amended by the First Amendment to the Business Combination Agreement dated October 12, 2021, the “Business Combination Agreement”), among DCRC, DCRC Merger Sub Inc., a Delaware corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC (“Merger Sub”), and Solid Power, Inc., a Colorado corporation (“Solid Power”), pursuant to which Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC and (b) approve such merger and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement (the “business combination” and such proposal, the “Business Combination Proposal”) (Proposal No. 1). A copy of the Business Combination Agreement is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A.

 

   

The Charter Proposals—To consider and vote upon each of the following proposals to amend DCRC’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Charter”) (collectively, the “Charter Proposals”):

 

   

The Authorized Share Charter Proposal—To increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (a) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A common stock (the “Class A Common Stock”) and 20,000,000 shares of Class B common stock (the “Class B Common Stock”), and (b) 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001, and (ii) 200,000,000 shares of preferred stock (the “Authorized Share Charter Proposal”) (Proposal No. 2); and

 

   

The Additional Charter Proposal—To (i) eliminate provisions in the Charter relating to DCRC’s initial business combination that will no longer be applicable to DCRC following the closing of the business combination (the “Closing”); (ii) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (iii) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of our proposed second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Proposed Second A&R Charter”) or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (iv) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (v) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (vi) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims (the “Additional Charter Proposal”) (Proposal No. 3).

The full text of the Proposed Second A&R Charter reflecting each of the proposed amendments pursuant to the Charter Proposals is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex B.

 

   

The Nasdaq Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve, for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (a) the issuance (or reservation for issuance in respect of certain options, restricted stock, and warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (b) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the private offering of securities to certain investors (the “Nasdaq Proposal”) (Proposal No. 4).


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The 2021 Plan Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) and material terms thereunder (the “2021 Plan Proposal”) (Proposal No. 5). A copy of the 2021 Plan is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex C.

 

   

The ESPP Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”) and material terms thereunder (the “ESPP Proposal”) (Proposal No. 6). A copy of the ESPP is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex D.

 

   

The Director Election Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to elect two directors to serve until the 2022 annual meeting of stockholders, two directors to serve until the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders and three directors to serve until the 2024 annual meeting of stockholders, and until their respective successors are duly elected and qualified, subject to such directors’ earlier death, resignation, retirement, disqualification or removal (the “Director Election Proposal”) (Proposal No. 7).

 

   

The Adjournment Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve the adjournment of the special meeting to a later date or dates, if necessary or appropriate, to permit further solicitation and vote of proxies in the event that there are insufficient votes for, or otherwise in connection with, the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Director Election Proposal (the “Adjournment Proposal” and, together with the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Director Election Proposal, the “Proposals”) (Proposal No. 8).

The special meeting will be completely virtual. There will be no physical meeting location and the special meeting will only be conducted via live webcast at the following address: https://www.cstproxy.com/decarbonizationplusacquisitioniii/2021.

The board of directors of DCRC (the “DCRC Board”) recommends that DCRC stockholders vote “FOR” each Proposal (or in the case of the Director Election Proposal, “FOR ALL NOMINEES”) being submitted to a vote of the stockholders at the special meeting. When you consider the recommendation of the DCRC Board in favor of each of the Proposals, you should keep in mind that certain of DCRC’s directors and officers have interests in the business combination that may conflict with your interests as a stockholder. Please see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Interests of Certain Persons in the Business Combination.”

Each of the Proposals is more fully described in this proxy statement/prospectus, which each DCRC stockholder is encouraged to review carefully.

DCRC’s Class A Common Stock and public warrants, which are exercisable for shares of Class A Common Stock under certain circumstances, are currently listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbols “DCRC” and “DCRCW,” respectively. In addition, certain of our shares of Class A Common Stock and warrants currently trade as units consisting of one share of Class A Common Stock and one-third of one warrant, and are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “DCRCU.” The units will automatically separate into the component securities upon consummation of the business combination and, as a result, will no longer trade as a separate security. In connection with the Closing, we intend to change our name from “Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III” to “Solid Power, Inc.,” and we have applied to list the shares of Class A Common Stock and the warrants of the post-combination company on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbols “SLDP” and “SLDPW,” respectively, following the Closing. DCRC anticipates that the Class A Common Stock and warrants of the post-combination company will cease trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market at the end of the trading day on which the Closing occurs and will commence trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market at the beginning of the trading day immediately following the day on which the Closing occurs.

Pursuant to our Charter, we are providing the holders of shares of Class A Common Stock originally sold as part of the units issued in our initial public offering (the “IPO” and such holders, the “public stockholders”) with


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the opportunity to redeem, upon the Closing, shares of Class A Common Stock then held by them for cash equal to their pro rata share of the aggregate amount on deposit (as of two business days prior to the Closing) in the trust account (the “Trust Account”) that holds the proceeds (including interest not previously released to DCRC to pay its franchise and income taxes) from the IPO and a concurrent private placement of warrants to Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor III LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (our “Sponsor”), and certain of our independent directors. For illustrative purposes, based on the fair value of cash and marketable securities held in the Trust Account as of June 30, 2021 of approximately $350.0 million, the estimated per share redemption price would have been approximately $10.00. Public stockholders may elect to redeem their shares whether or not they are holders as of the record date and whether or not they vote for the Business Combination Proposal. Notwithstanding the foregoing redemption rights, a public stockholder, together with any of his, her or its affiliates or any other person with whom he, she or it is acting in concert or as a “group” (as defined under Section 13(d)(3) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended), will be restricted from redeeming in the aggregate his, her or its shares or, if part of such a group, the group’s shares, in excess of 20% of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock sold in the IPO. Holders of DCRC’s outstanding warrants sold in the IPO, which are exercisable for shares of Class A Common Stock under certain circumstances, do not have redemption rights in connection with the business combination. Our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to waive their redemption rights in connection with the consummation of the business combination with respect to any shares of Class A Common Stock they may hold, and our shares of Class B Common Stock will be excluded from the pro rata calculation used to determine the per share redemption price. Currently, our Sponsor and directors own approximately 20% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, including all of the shares of Class B Common Stock. Our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to vote any shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock owned by them in favor of the business combination.

DCRC is providing this proxy statement/prospectus and accompanying proxy card to its stockholders in connection with the solicitation of proxies to be voted at the special meeting and any adjournments or postponements of the special meeting. Your vote is very important. Whether or not you plan to attend the special meeting virtually, please submit your proxy card without delay.

We encourage you to read this proxy statement/prospectus carefully. In particular, you should review the matters discussed under the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 40 of this proxy statement/prospectus.

Approval of each of the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Adjournment Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote and actually cast thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Authorized Share Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of (i) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class, and (ii) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Additional Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Director Election Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of a plurality of the votes cast by holders of our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock at the special meeting and entitled to vote thereon, voting as a single class.

If you sign, date and return your proxy card without indicating how you wish to vote, your proxy will be voted “FOR” each of Proposal Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8 and “FOR ALL NOMINEES” for Proposal No. 7. If you fail to return your proxy card or fail to submit your proxy by telephone or over the Internet, or fail to instruct your bank, broker or other nominee how to vote, and do not virtually attend the special meeting, the effect will be that your shares will not be counted for purposes of determining whether a quorum is present at the special meeting and, if a quorum is present, will have no effect on the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal, the Director Election Proposal or the Adjournment


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Proposal, but will have the same effect as a vote “AGAINST” the Charter Proposals. If you are a stockholder of record and you virtually attend the special meeting and wish to vote, you may withdraw your proxy and vote online.

TO EXERCISE YOUR REDEMPTION RIGHTS, YOU MUST ELECT TO HAVE DCRC REDEEM YOUR SHARES FOR A PRO RATA PORTION OF THE FUNDS HELD IN THE TRUST ACCOUNT AND TENDER YOUR SHARES TO DCRC’S TRANSFER AGENT AT LEAST TWO BUSINESS DAYS PRIOR TO THE VOTE AT THE SPECIAL MEETING. YOU MAY TENDER YOUR SHARES BY EITHER DELIVERING YOUR SHARE CERTIFICATE TO THE TRANSFER AGENT OR BY DELIVERING YOUR SHARES ELECTRONICALLY USING THE DEPOSITORY TRUST COMPANY’S DWAC (DEPOSIT WITHDRAWAL AT CUSTODIAN) SYSTEM. IF THE BUSINESS COMBINATION IS NOT COMPLETED, THEN THESE SHARES WILL NOT BE REDEEMED FOR CASH. IF YOU HOLD THE SHARES IN STREET NAME, YOU WILL NEED TO INSTRUCT THE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE AT YOUR BANK OR BROKER TO WITHDRAW THE SHARES FROM YOUR ACCOUNT IN ORDER TO EXERCISE YOUR REDEMPTION RIGHTS.

Thank you for your consideration of these matters.

Sincerely,

Erik Anderson

Chief Executive Officer and Director

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III

Whether or not you plan to attend the special meeting of DCRC stockholders online, please submit your proxy by completing, signing, dating and mailing the enclosed proxy card in the pre-addressed postage paid envelope or by using the telephone or Internet procedures provided to you by your broker or bank. If your shares are held in an account at a brokerage firm or bank, you must instruct your broker or bank on how to vote your shares or, if you wish to attend the special meeting of DCRC stockholders and vote online, you must obtain a proxy from your broker or bank.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this proxy statement/prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

This proxy statement/prospectus is dated                 , 2021 and is first being mailed to DCRC stockholders on or about                 , 2021.


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DECARBONIZATION PLUS ACQUISITION CORPORATION III

2744 Sand Hill Road, Suite 100

Menlo Park, California 94025

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS

OF DECARBONIZATION PLUS ACQUISITION CORPORATION III

To Be Held On December 7, 2021

To the Stockholders of Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the special meeting (the “special meeting”) of stockholders of Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III (“DCRC,” “we,” “our,” “us” or the “Company”) will be held at 10:00 a.m., Eastern time, on December 7, 2021, via live webcast at the following address: https://www.cstproxy.com/decarbonizationplusacquisitioniii/2021. At the special meeting, DCRC stockholders will be asked to consider and vote upon the following proposals:

 

   

The Business Combination Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to (a) approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, dated as of June 15, 2021 (as amended by the First Amendment to the Business Combination Agreement dated October 12, 2021, the “Business Combination Agreement”), among DCRC, DCRC Merger Sub Inc., a Delaware corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC (“Merger Sub”), and Solid Power, Inc., a Colorado corporation (“Solid Power”), pursuant to which Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC and (b) approve such merger and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement (the “business combination” and such proposal, the “Business Combination Proposal”) (Proposal No. 1). A copy of the Business Combination Agreement is attached to the accompanying proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A.

 

   

The Charter Proposals—To consider and vote upon each of the following proposals to amend DCRC’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Charter”) (collectively, the “Charter Proposals”):

 

   

The Authorized Share Charter Proposal—To increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (a) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A common stock (the “Class A Common Stock”) and 20,000,000 shares of Class B common stock (the “Class B Common Stock”), and (b) 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (ii) 200,000,000 shares of preferred stock (the “Authorized Share Charter Proposal”) (Proposal No. 2); and

 

   

The Additional Charter Proposal—To (i) eliminate provisions in the Charter relating to DCRC’s initial business combination that will no longer be applicable to DCRC following the closing of the business combination (the “Closing”); (ii) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (iii) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of our proposed second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Proposed Second A&R Charter”) or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (iv) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (v) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (vi) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims (the “Additional Charter Proposal”) (Proposal No. 3).

The full text of our proposed second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Proposed Second A&R Charter”) reflecting each of the proposed amendments pursuant to the Charter Proposals is attached to the accompanying proxy statement/prospectus as Annex B.


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The Nasdaq Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve, for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (a) the issuance (or reservation for issuance in respect of certain options, restricted stock, and warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power restricted stock, and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (b) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the private offering of securities to certain investors (the “Nasdaq Proposal”) (Proposal No. 4).

 

   

The 2021 Plan Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) and material terms thereunder (the “2021 Plan Proposal”).

(Proposal No. 5). A copy of the 2021 Plan is attached to the accompanying proxy statement/prospectus as Annex C.

 

   

The ESPP Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”) and material terms thereunder (the “ESPP Proposal”) (Proposal No. 6). A copy of the ESPP is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex D.

 

   

The Director Election Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to elect two directors to serve until the 2022 annual meeting of stockholders, two directors to serve until the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders and three directors to serve until the 2024 annual meeting of stockholders, and until their respective successors are duly elected and qualified, subject to such directors’ earlier death, resignation, retirement, disqualification or removal (the “Director Election Proposal”) (Proposal No. 7).

 

   

The Adjournment Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve the adjournment of the special meeting to a later date or dates, if necessary or appropriate, to permit further solicitation and vote of proxies in the event that there are insufficient votes for, or otherwise in connection with, the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Director Election Proposal (the “Adjournment Proposal” and, together with the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Director Election Proposal, the “Proposals”) (Proposal No. 8).

The special meeting will be completely virtual. There will be no physical meeting location and the special meeting will only be conducted via live webcast at the following address: https://www.cstproxy.com/decarbonizationplusacquisitioniii/2021.

Only holders of record of DCRC’s Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock at the close of business on October 29, 2021 are entitled to notice of the special meeting and to vote at the special meeting and any adjournments or postponements thereof. A complete list of DCRC’s stockholders of record entitled to vote at the special meeting will be available at the special meeting and for ten days before the special meeting at DCRC’s principal executive offices for inspection by stockholders during ordinary business hours for any purpose germane to the special meeting.

Pursuant to our Charter, we are providing the holders of shares of Class A Common Stock originally sold as part of the units issued in our initial public offering (the “IPO” and such holders, the “public stockholders”) with the opportunity to redeem, upon the Closing, shares of Class A Common Stock then held by them for cash equal to their pro rata share of the aggregate amount on deposit (as of two business days prior to the Closing) in the trust account (the “Trust Account”) that holds the proceeds (including interest not previously released to DCRC to pay its franchise and income taxes) from the IPO and a concurrent private placement of warrants to Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor III LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (our “Sponsor”), and certain of our independent directors. For illustrative purposes, based on the fair value of cash and marketable securities held in the Trust Account as of June 30, 2021 of approximately $350.0 million, the estimated per share redemption price would have been approximately $10.00. Public stockholders may elect to redeem their shares


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whether or not they are holders as of the record date and whether or not they vote for the Business Combination Proposal. Notwithstanding the foregoing redemption rights, a public stockholder, together with any of his, her or its affiliates or any other person with whom he, she or it is acting in concert or as a “group” (as defined under Section 13(d)(3) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended), will be restricted from redeeming in the aggregate his, her or its shares or, if part of such a group, the group’s shares, in excess of 20% of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock sold in the IPO. Holders of DCRC’s outstanding warrants sold in the IPO, which are exercisable for shares of Class A Common Stock under certain circumstances, do not have redemption rights in connection with the business combination. Our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to waive their redemption rights in connection with the consummation of the business combination with respect to any shares of Class A Common Stock they may hold, and our shares of Class B Common Stock will be excluded from the pro rata calculation used to determine the per share redemption price. Currently, our Sponsor and directors own approximately 20% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, including all of the shares of Class B Common Stock. Our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to vote any shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock owned by them in favor of the business combination.

We may not consummate the business combination unless the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals and the Nasdaq Proposal are approved at the special meeting. The Charter Proposals, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Director Election Proposal are conditioned on the approval of the Business Combination Proposal and the Nasdaq Proposal. The Adjournment Proposal is not conditioned on the approval of any other Proposal set forth in the accompanying proxy statement/prospectus.

Your attention is directed to the proxy statement/prospectus accompanying this notice (including the annexes thereto) for a more complete description of the proposed business combination and related transactions and each of our Proposals. We encourage you to read the accompanying proxy statement/prospectus carefully. If you have any questions or need assistance voting your shares, please call our proxy solicitor, Morrow Sodali LLC, at (800) 662-5200 (banks and brokers call collect at (203) 658-9400).

                , 2021

By Order of the Board of Directors

Erik Anderson

Chief Executive Officer and Director


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

ABOUT THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS

     ii  

CERTAIN DEFINED TERMS

     iii  

SUMMARY TERM SHEET

     viii  

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THE PROPOSALS FOR DCRC STOCKHOLDERS

     1  

SUMMARY OF THE PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS

     20  

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

     38  

RISK FACTORS

     40  

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     87  

COMPARATIVE SHARE INFORMATION

     99  

SPECIAL MEETING OF DCRC STOCKHOLDERS

     101  

PROPOSAL NO. 1—THE BUSINESS COMBINATION PROPOSAL

     106  

PROPOSAL NO. 2—THE AUTHORIZED SHARE CHARTER PROPOSAL

     147  

PROPOSAL NO. 3—THE ADDITIONAL CHARTER PROPOSAL

     148  

PROPOSAL NO. 4—THE NASDAQ PROPOSAL

     151  

PROPOSAL NO. 5—THE 2021 PLAN PROPOSAL

     152  

PROPOSAL NO. 6—THE ESPP PROPOSAL

     161  

PROPOSAL NO. 7—THE DIRECTOR ELECTION PROPOSAL

     167  

PROPOSAL NO. 8—THE ADJOURNMENT PROPOSAL

     168  

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS OF SOLID POWER

     169  

INFORMATION ABOUT SOLID POWER

     184  

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS OF DCRC

     201  

INFORMATION ABOUT DCRC

     205  

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

     217  

MANAGEMENT AFTER THE BUSINESS COMBINATION

     226  

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

     234  

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF SECURITIES

     247  

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

     250  

PRICE RANGE AND DIVIDENDS OF SECURITIES

     255  

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED ACCOUNTING FIRM

     256  

HOUSEHOLDING INFORMATION

     256  

TRANSFER AGENT AND REGISTRAR

     256  

SUBMISSION OF STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS

     256  

FUTURE STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS

     256  

EXPERTS

     258  

LEGAL MATTERS

     258  

WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

     258  

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

     F-1  

ANNEX A: BUSINESS COMBINATION AGREEMENT AND PLAN OF REORGANIZATION

     A-1  

ANNEX A-1: FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE BUSINESS COMBINATION AGREEMENT

     A-1-1  

ANNEX B: SECOND AMENDED AND RESTATED CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION

     B-1  

ANNEX C: SOLID POWER, INC. 2021 EQUITY INCENTIVE PLAN

     C-1  

ANNEX D: SOLID POWER, INC. 2021 EMPLOYEE STOCK PURCHASE PLAN

     D-1  

 

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ABOUT THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS

This document, which forms part of a registration statement on Form S-4 filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) by DCRC (File No. 333-258681) (the “Registration Statement”), constitutes a prospectus of DCRC under Section 5 of the Securities Act with respect to the shares of Class A Common Stock to be issued if the business combination described below is consummated. This document also constitutes a notice of meeting and a proxy statement under Section 14(a) of the Exchange Act with respect to the special meeting of DCRC stockholders at which DCRC stockholders will be asked to consider and vote upon a proposal to approve the business combination by the approval and adoption of the Business Combination Agreement, among other matters.

This proxy statement/prospectus incorporates important business and financial information about DCRC that is not included in or delivered with the document.

This information is available without charge to you upon written or oral request. To make this request, you should contact our proxy solicitor at:

Morrow Sodali LLC

470 West Avenue

Stamford, Connecticut 06902

Telephone: (800) 662-5200

(banks and brokers call collect at (203) 658-9400)

Email: DCRC.info@investor.morrowsodali.com

To obtain timely delivery of requested materials, you must request the information no later than five business days prior to the date of the special meeting.

You may also obtain additional information about us from documents filed with the SEC by following the instruction in the section entitled “Where You Can Find Additional Information.”

 

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CERTAIN DEFINED TERMS

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this proxy statement/prospectus to:

 

   

“Additional PIPE” are to the private offering of securities of New Solid Power to the Additional PIPE Investor in connection with the business combination;

 

   

“Additional PIPE Investor” are to SK Innovation, the sole investor in the Additional PIPE Financing;

 

   

“ASC 815” are to Accounting Standards Codification 815-40, “Derivatives and Hedging — Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity;”

 

   

“business combination” are to the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement;

 

   

“Business Combination Agreement” are to that certain Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, dated as of June 15, 2021, by and among DCRC, Merger Sub and Solid Power, as amended by the First Amendment to the Business Combination Agreement dated October 12, 2021;

 

   

“Charter” are to DCRC’s Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation;

 

   

“Class A Common Stock” are to (a) prior to giving effect to the business combination, DCRC’s Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (b) after giving effect to the business combination, the Class A Common Stock re-designated as “common stock, par value $0.0001 per share”;

 

   

“Class B Common Stock” are to DCRC’s Class B Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share;

 

   

“Closing” are to the closing of the business combination;

 

   

“Closing Date” are to the date on which the Closing occurs;

 

   

“Code” are to Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended;

 

   

“Conversion Reaction Cell” are to Solid Power’s conversion reaction cathode cells.

 

   

“DCRC,” “we,” “our,” “us” or the “Company” are to Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III, a Delaware corporation;

 

   

“DCRC Board” are to the board of directors of DCRC;

 

   

“Effective Time” are to the effective time of the Merger;

 

   

“Exchange Act” are to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended;

 

   

“Exchange Ratio” are to the quotient obtained by dividing (i) the Solid Power Merger Shares by (ii) the Solid Power Outstanding Shares;

 

   

“EV” are to electric vehicle;

 

   

“eVTOL” are to electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft;

 

   

“FCPA” are to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act;

 

   

“Ford” are to Ford Motor Company, a Delaware corporation;

 

   

“Founder Shares” are to the outstanding shares of our Class B Common Stock and the 8,710,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock that were issued in connection with the conversion of an aggregate of 8,710,000 shares of our Class B Common Stock by certain of the initial stockholders on October 25, 2021;

 

   

“GAAP” are to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles;

 

   

“Historical Rollover Stockholders” are to the holders of shares of Class A Common Stock that will be issued in exchange for all outstanding shares of Solid Power Common Stock in the business combination (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination);

 

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“JDAs” are to joint development agreements;

 

   

“Initial Business Combination” are to our initial merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses;

 

   

“initial stockholders” are to the holders of our Founder Shares, which includes our Sponsor and our independent directors;

 

   

“Initial Public Offering” or “IPO” are to DCRC’s initial public offering of units, which closed on March 26, 2021;

 

   

“IRS” are to the Internal Revenue Service;

 

   

“Li2S” are to lithium-containing precursor material;

 

   

“Lithium Metal EV Cell” are to Solid Power’s lithium metal anode battery cells;

 

   

“management” or our “management team” are to our officers and directors;

 

   

“Merger” are to the merger of Merger Sub with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC;

 

   

“Merger Sub” are to DCRC Merger Sub Inc., a Delaware corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC;

 

   

“Merger Sub Common Stock” are to Merger Sub’s common stock, par value $0.0001 per share;

 

   

“New Solid Power” are to (a) prior to giving effect to the business combination, DCRC, and (b) after giving effect to the business combination, Solid Power, Inc., the new name of DCRC after giving effect to the business combination;

 

   

“New Solid Power Board” are to the board of directors of New Solid Power.

 

   

“New PIPE Investors” are to investors in the PIPE Financing;

 

   

“NMC” are to lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide;

 

   

“NOLs” are to net operating loss carryforwards;

 

   

“OEM” are to original equipment manufacturers;

 

   

“PIPE Financing” are to the Signing PIPE and the Additional PIPE, collectively;

 

   

“PIPE Funds” are to the proceeds from the PIPE Financing;

 

   

“PIPE Shares” are to the shares of Class A Common Stock that are issued in the PIPE Financing;

 

   

“PPP” are to the 2020 Payroll Protection Plan.

 

   

“Preferred Stock” are to (a) prior to giving effect to the business combination, DCRC’s Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (b) after giving effect to the business combination, New Solid Power’s Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001 per share;

 

   

“private placement warrants” are to the warrants issued to our Sponsor and certain of our independent directors in a private placement simultaneously with the closing of our IPO;

 

   

“Proposed Bylaws” are to the proposed amended and restated bylaws of New Solid Power, which will be effective immediately prior to the completion of the business combination;

 

   

“Proposed Second A&R Charter” are to the proposed second amended and restated certificate of incorporation of New Solid Power, which will be effective immediately prior to the completion of the business combination;

 

   

“public shares” are to shares of DCRC’s Class A Common Stock sold as part of the units in the IPO (whether they were purchased in the IPO or thereafter in the open market);

 

   

“public stockholders” are to the holders of DCRC’s public shares;

 

   

“public warrants” are to the warrants sold as part of the units in the IPO (whether they were purchased in the IPO or thereafter in the open market);

 

   

“Riverstone” are to Riverstone Investment Group LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, and its affiliates;

 

   

“Sarbanes-Oxley Act” are to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2020;

 

   

“SEC” are to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission;

 

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“Series B Financing” are to Solid Power’s issuance and sale of an aggregate (i) 8,777,812 shares of Solid Power Series B Preferred Stock and (ii) 1,755,557 warrants to purchase Solid Power Common Stock, in exchange for all of Solid Power’s $13.4 million aggregate principal amount of convertible promissory notes and $135.6 million in cash, which issuance and sale concluded May 12, 2021.

 

   

“Securities Act” are to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended;

 

   

“Signing PIPE” are to the private offering of securities of New Solid Power to certain investors that entered into subscription agreements with DCRC and Solid Power as of the date of the Business Combination Agreement;

 

   

“Signing PIPE Investors” are to the investors in the Signing PIPE;

 

   

“SK Innovation” are to SK Innovation Co., Ltd.;

 

   

“Silicon EV Cell” are to Solid Power’s high-content silicon anode battery cells;

 

   

“Solid Power” are to Solid Power, Inc., a Colorado corporation;

 

   

“Solid Power Charter” are to Solid Power’s Fourth Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated April 30, 2021, as the same may have been amended, supplemented or modified from time to time;

 

   

“Solid Power Common Stock” are to Solid Power’s common stock, par value $0.0001 per share;

 

   

“Solid Power Merger Shares” are 123,900,000;

 

   

“Solid Power Options” are to all options to purchase shares of Solid Power Common Stock, whether or not exercisable and whether or not vested, outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time under the Solid Power Stock Plan or otherwise;

 

   

“Solid Power Outstanding Shares” are to the sum of (without duplication) (i) total number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time, expressed on a fully-diluted and as-converted to Solid Power Common Stock basis and including, for the avoidance of doubt, the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock issuable upon conversion of the Solid Power Preferred Stock pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, plus (ii) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock that are issuable upon the net exercise of Solid Power Options that are vested, unexpired, issued and outstanding as of immediately prior to the Effective Time, assuming that the fair market value of one share of Solid Power Common Stock issuable pursuant to a Solid Power Option equals (x) the Exchange Ratio multiplied by (y) $10.00, plus (iii) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock issuable upon the net exercise of Solid Power Warrants that are unexpired, issued and outstanding as of immediately prior to the Effective Time, assuming that the fair market value of one share of Solid Power Common Stock issuable pursuant to a Solid Power Warrant equals the (x) Exchange Ratio multiplied by (y) $10.00, provided that, the Solid Power Outstanding Shares excludes any unvested Solid Power Options, certain promised and unissued Solid Power Options and the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to the awards of Solid Power Restricted Stock;

 

   

“Solid Power Preferred Stock” are to the Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock and the Solid Power Series B Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately prior to the consummation of the business combination;

 

   

“Solid Power Restricted Stock” are to unvested restricted shares of Solid Power Common Stock outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time under the Solid Power Stock Plan or otherwise;

 

   

“Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock” are to Solid Power’s preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share, designated as Series A-1 Preferred Stock in the Solid Power Charter;

 

   

“Solid Power Series B Preferred Stock” are to Solid Power’s preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share, designated as Series B Preferred Stock in the Solid Power Charter, which were issued in the Series B Financing;

 

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“Solid Power Stock” are to Solid Power Common Stock and Solid Power Preferred Stock;

 

   

“Solid Power Stock Plan” are to the Solid Power, Inc. 2014 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended on April 7, 2015, February 1, 2017, and February 20, 2019 as such may have been further amended, supplemented or modified from time to time;

 

   

“Solid Power Warrants” are to warrants to purchase shares of Solid Power Common Stock and/or Solid Power Preferred Stock;

 

   

“special meeting” are to the special meeting of stockholders of DCRC that is the subject of this proxy statement/prospectus and any adjournments or postponements thereof;

 

   

“Sponsor” are to Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor III LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, and an affiliate of Riverstone;

 

   

“Surviving Corporation” are to (a) prior to giving effect to the business combination, Solid Power, and (b) after giving effect to the business combination, Solid Power Operating, Inc., the new name of Solid Power after giving effect to the business combination;

 

   

“Trust Account” are to the trust account that holds the proceeds (including interest not previously released to DCRC to pay its franchise and income taxes) from the IPO and the concurrent private placement of private placement warrants;

 

   

“units” are to the units sold in the IPO, each of which consists of one share of Class A Common Stock and one-third of one public warrant; and

 

   

“voting common stock” are to DCRC’s Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock.

Unless otherwise specified, the voting and economic interests of DCRC stockholders set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus assume the following:

 

   

no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed;

 

   

19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock are issued in the PIPE Financing;

 

   

at Closing, 102,658,230 shares of Class A Common Stock are issued to Historical Rollover Stockholders in the business combination, and the Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock, and Solid Power Warrants convert into options, restricted stock and warrants in respect of 36,502,897 shares of Class A Common Stock;

 

   

none of DCRC’s initial stockholders, the Historical Rollover Stockholders, or the New PIPE Investors purchase shares of Class A Common Stock in the open market;

 

   

our Sponsor does not convert any working capital loans that it has made to DCRC into additional warrants;

 

   

that there are no other issuances of equity interests of DCRC or Solid Power prior to or in connection with the Closing; and

 

   

that there are no exercises of Solid Power Options or Solid Power Warrants prior to or in connection with the Closing.

Based on the assumptions set forth above, the Exchange Ratio would be calculated as the quotient obtained by dividing (i) 123,900,000 (the number of Solid Power Merger Shares), by (ii) approximately 38,872,881 (the number of Solid Power Outstanding Shares) shares of Solid Power Common Stock outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time, expressed on a fully-diluted and as converted to Solid Power Common Stock basis, and would accordingly be 3.1873.

Further, unless otherwise specified, the voting and economic interests of DCRC stockholders set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus do not take into account the private placement warrants and public warrants, which will remain outstanding following the business combination and may be exercised at a later date.

 

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In accordance with our Charter, shares of Class B Common Stock will automatically convert into shares of Class A Common Stock on a one-for-one basis upon consummation of the business combination, resulting in the issuance of 40,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the aggregate.

Certain sections in this proxy statement/prospectus refer to a maximum redemption scenario. Unless otherwise specified, that scenario assumes for illustrative purposes that 24,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock are redeemed in connection with the Closing, resulting in an aggregate payment of approximately $245.0 million from the Trust Account. For more information, see the section entitled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information.”

 

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SUMMARY TERM SHEET

This Summary Term Sheet, together with the sections entitled “Questions and Answers About the Proposals for DCRC Stockholders” and “Summary of the Proxy Statement/Prospectus,” summarizes certain information contained in this proxy statement/prospectus, but does not contain all of the information that is important to you. You should read carefully this entire proxy statement/prospectus, including the attached annexes, for a more complete understanding of the matters to be considered at the special meeting.

 

   

DCRC is a blank check company incorporated as a Delaware corporation for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses. For more information about DCRC, see the section entitled “Information About DCRC.”

 

   

There are currently 43,710,000 shares of DCRC’s Class A Common Stock and 40,000 shares of DCRC’s Class B Common Stock issued and outstanding. In addition, there are currently 18,333,334 warrants of DCRC outstanding, consisting of 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants. Each whole warrant entitles the holder to purchase one whole share of Class A Common Stock for $11.50 per share. The warrants will become exercisable on the later of 30 days after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or 12 months from the closing of our Initial Public Offering and will expire five years after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or earlier upon redemption or liquidation. Once the warrants become exercisable, DCRC may redeem warrants in certain circumstances. See the section entitled “Description of Securities—Warrants.”

 

   

Solid Power, a Colorado corporation, is developing all-solid-state battery cell technology that replaces the liquid or gel polymer electrolyte used in conventional lithium-ion battery cells with a sulfide-based solid electrolyte, and is focused solely on the development and commercialization of all-solid-state battery cells and solid electrolyte materials, primarily for the fast-growing battery-powered electric vehicle market. For more information about Solid Power, see the sections entitled “Information About Solid Power” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Solid Power.”

 

   

On June 15, 2021, we and our wholly owned subsidiary, Merger Sub, entered into the Business Combination Agreement with Solid Power. The parties subsequently amended the Business Combination Agreement on October 12, 2021. A copy of the Business Combination Agreement is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A, and a copy of the First Amendment to the Business Combination Agreement is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A-1.

 

   

Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of New Solid Power. For more information about the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal.”

 

   

At the Closing, 102,658,230 shares of Class A Common Stock will be issued to the Historical Rollover Stockholders in the business combination in exchange for all outstanding shares of Solid Power Common Stock. It is also anticipated that we will reserve for issuance up to 36,502,897 shares of Class A Common Stock in respect of New Solid Power options. Restricted stock and warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants, and each share of Class A Common Stock will be re-designated as “common stock, par value $0.0001.” For more information about the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal.”

 

   

The Closing is subject to the satisfaction (or waiver) of a number of conditions set forth in the Business Combination Agreement, including, among others, receipt of the requisite stockholder approval of the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination as contemplated by this proxy statement/prospectus. For more information about the closing conditions to the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—The Business Combination Agreement—Conditions to Closing of the Business Combination Agreement.”

 

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The Business Combination Agreement may be terminated at any time prior to the consummation of the business combination upon mutual written consent of DCRC and Solid Power, or for other reasons in specified circumstances. For more information about the termination rights under the Business Combination Agreement, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—The Business Combination Agreement—Termination.”

 

   

The proposed business combination involves numerous risks. For more information about these risks, please see the section entitled “Risk Factors.”

 

   

Pursuant to the PIPE Financing, we have agreed to issue and sell to certain investors, and those investors have agreed to buy from us, in connection with the Closing, an aggregate of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock at a purchase price of $10.00 per share for an aggregate commitment of $195,000,000. Such Class A Common Stock would be valued at approximately $238,095,000, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021.

 

   

Under our Charter, in connection with the business combination, our public stockholders may elect to have their shares redeemed for cash at the applicable redemption price per share calculated in accordance with our Charter. As of June 30, 2021, this would have amounted to approximately $10.00 per share. If a holder exercises its redemption rights, then such holder will be exchanging its public shares for cash and will no longer own shares of DCRC following the completion of the business combination and will not participate in the future growth of New Solid Power, if any. Such a holder will be entitled to receive cash for its public shares only if it properly demands redemption and delivers its shares (either physically or electronically) to our transfer agent at least two business days prior to the special meeting. For more information regarding these procedures, see the section entitled “Special Meeting of DCRC Stockholders—Redemption Rights.”

 

   

We anticipate that, upon the Closing, the ownership of New Solid Power will be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 61.9% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the public stockholders will own 35,000,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 21.1% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 11.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 8,750,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 5.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The number of shares and the interests set forth above (a) assume (i) that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, (ii) that there are no other issuances of equity interests of DCRC or Solid Power and (iii) that there are no exercises of Solid Power Options or Solid Power Warrants and (b) do not take into account DCRC warrants that will remain outstanding following the business combination and may be exercised at a later date. As a result of the business combination, the economic and voting interests of our public stockholders will decrease.

If we assume the maximum redemptions scenario described under the section entitled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information—Basis of Pro Forma Presentation,” i.e., 24,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock are redeemed, and the assumptions set forth in the foregoing clauses (a)(ii)–(iii) and (b) remain true, the ownership of New Solid Power upon the Closing will be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 72.6% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

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the public stockholders will own 10,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 7.4% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 13.8% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 8,750,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 6.2% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The ownership percentages with respect to New Solid Power set forth above do not take into account warrants to purchase Class A Common Stock that will remain outstanding immediately following the business combination, but do include the Founder Shares. If the facts are different than these assumptions, the percentage ownership retained by DCRC’s existing stockholders in New Solid Power following the business combination will be different. For example, if we assume that all outstanding 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants were exercisable and exercised following completion of the business combination and further assume that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, then the ownership of New Solid Power would be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 55.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the public stockholders will own 46,666,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 25.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 10.6% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 15,416,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 8.4% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The public warrants and private placement warrants will become exercisable on the later of 30 days after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or 12 months from the closing of our Initial Public Offering and will expire five years after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or earlier upon their redemption or liquidation.

Please see the sections entitled “Summary of the Proxy Statement/Prospectus—Ownership of New Solid Power After the Closing” and “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” for further information.

 

   

The DCRC Board considered various factors in determining whether to approve the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination. For more information about the DCRC Board’s decision-making process, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—DCRC Board’s Reasons for the Approval of the Business Combination.”

 

   

In addition to voting on the proposal to approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination (the “Business Combination Proposal”) at the special meeting, DCRC’s stockholders will also be asked to vote on the approval of:

 

   

an amendment to DCRC’s Charter to increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (a) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and 20,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock, and (b) 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (ii) 200,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock (the “Authorized Share Charter Proposal”);

 

   

amendments to DCRC’s Charter to (i) eliminate provisions in the Charter relating to DCRC’s Initial Business Combination that will no longer be applicable to DCRC following the Closing;

 

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(ii) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (iii) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of the Proposed Second A&R Charter or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (iv) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (v) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (vi) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims (the “Additional Charter Proposal” and, together with the Authorized Share Charter Proposal, the “Charter Proposals”);

 

   

for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (a) the issuance (or reservation for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (b) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the PIPE Financing (the “Nasdaq Proposal”);

 

   

the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) and material terms thereunder (the “2021 Plan Proposal”);

 

   

the Solid Power, Inc. 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”) and material terms thereunder (the “ESPP”);

 

   

the election of two directors to serve until the 2022 annual meeting of stockholders, two directors to serve until the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders and three directors to serve until the 2024 annual meeting of stockholders, and until their respective successors are duly elected and qualified, subject to such directors’ earlier death, resignation, retirement, disqualification or removal (the “Director Election Proposal”); and

 

   

the adjournment of the special meeting to a later date or dates, if necessary or appropriate, to permit further solicitation and vote of proxies in the event that there are insufficient votes for, or otherwise in connection with, the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Director Election Proposal (the “Adjournment Proposal” and, together with the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Director Election Proposal, the “Proposals”).

For more information, see the sections entitled “Proposal No. 2—The Authorized Share Charter Proposal,” “Proposal No. 3—The Additional Charter Proposal,” “Proposal No. 4—The Nasdaq Proposal,” “Proposal No. 5—The 2021 Plan Proposal,” “Proposal No. 6—The ESPP Proposal,” “Proposal No. 7—The Director Election Proposal” and “Proposal No. 8—The Adjournment Proposal.”

 

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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THE PROPOSALS FOR DCRC STOCKHOLDERS

The following questions and answers briefly address some commonly asked questions about the Proposals to be presented at the special meeting of stockholders of DCRC, including the proposed business combination. The following questions and answers do not include all the information that is important to DCRC stockholders. We urge DCRC stockholders to carefully read this entire proxy statement/prospectus, including the annexes and other documents referred to herein.

 

Q:

Why am I receiving this proxy statement/prospectus?

 

A:

DCRC stockholders are being asked to consider and vote upon, among other things, a proposal to (a) approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement, pursuant to which Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC, (b) approve such merger and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement and (c) approve, for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (i) the issuance to the Historical Rollover Stockholders (or reservation for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (ii) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the PIPE Financing.

A copy of the Business Combination Agreement is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A, and a copy of the First Amendment to the Business Combination Agreement is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex A-1. This proxy statement/prospectus and its annexes contain important information about the proposed business combination and the other matters to be acted upon at the special meeting. You should read this proxy statement/prospectus and its annexes carefully and in their entirety.

Your vote is important. You are encouraged to submit your proxy as soon as possible after carefully reviewing this proxy statement/prospectus and its annexes.

 

Q:

What is being voted on at the special meeting?

 

A:

DCRC stockholders will vote on the following proposals at the special meeting.

 

   

The Business Combination Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement and the transactions contemplated thereby (Proposal No. 1).

 

   

The Charter Proposals—To consider and vote upon each of the following proposals to amend the Charter:

 

   

The Authorized Share Charter Proposal—To increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (a) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and 20,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock, and (b) 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (ii) 200,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock (the “Authorized Share Charter Proposal”) (Proposal No. 2); and

 

   

The Additional Charter Proposal—To (i) eliminate provisions in the Charter relating to DCRC’s Initial Business Combination that will no longer be applicable to DCRC following the Closing; (ii) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (iii) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of our proposed second amended and Proposed Second A&R Charter or any provision inconsistent with any provision of the New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (iv) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (v) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (vi) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims (Proposal No. 3).

 

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The full text of our proposed second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Proposed Second A&R Charter”) reflecting each of the proposed amendments pursuant to the Charter Proposals is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex B.

 

   

The Nasdaq Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve, for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (a) the issuance to the Historical Rollover Stockholders (or reservation for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (b) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the PIPE Financing (Proposal No. 4).

 

   

The 2021 Plan Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the 2021 Plan and material terms thereunder (Proposal No. 5). A copy of the 2021 Plan is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex C.

 

   

The ESPP Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve and adopt the ESPP and material terms thereunder (Proposal No. 6). A copy of the ESPP is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex D.

 

   

The Director Election Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to elect two directors to serve until the 2022 annual meeting of stockholders, two directors to serve until the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders and three directors to serve until the 2024 annual meeting of stockholders, and until their respective successors are duly elected and qualified, subject to such directors’ earlier death, resignation, retirement, disqualification or removal (Proposal No. 7).

 

   

The Adjournment Proposal—To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve the adjournment of the special meeting to a later date or dates, if necessary or appropriate, to permit further solicitation and vote of proxies in the event that there are insufficient votes for, or otherwise in connection with, the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Director Election Proposal (Proposal No. 8).

 

Q:

Are the Proposals conditioned on one another?

 

A:

We may not consummate the business combination unless the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals and the Nasdaq Proposal are approved at the special meeting. The Charter Proposals, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Director Election Proposal are conditioned on the approval of the Business Combination Proposal and the Nasdaq Proposal. The Adjournment Proposal is not conditioned on the approval of any other Proposal set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus.

 

Q:

What will happen in the business combination?

 

A:

Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger. After giving effect to the merger, Solid Power will become a wholly owned subsidiary of New Solid Power. At the Closing, 102,658,230 shares of Class A Common Stock will be issued to the Historical Rollover Stockholders in the business combination in exchange for all outstanding shares of Solid Power Common Stock (and 36,502,897 shares of Class A Common Stock will be reserved for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants), and each share of Class A Common Stock will be re-designated as “common stock, par value $0.0001.” For more information about the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal.”

 

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Q:

How were the transaction structure and consideration for the business combination determined?

Following the closing of the IPO, DCRC representatives commenced a robust search for businesses or assets to acquire for the purpose of consummating DCRC’s Initial Business Combination. On March 29, 2021, Robert Tichio, a member of the DCRC Board, and John Staudinger, a Managing Director of Riverstone Holdings, LLC, an affiliate of our Sponsor, participated in a video conference with representatives of Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated (“Stifel”) and Solid Power regarding a possible transaction between DCRC and Solid Power. Solid Power had engaged Stifel on February 20, 2020 to serve as its financial advisor in connection with Solid Power’s Series B Financing. This engagement was revised on March 19, 2021 to include Stifel’s engagement as strategic advisor in connection with consideration and pursuit of a potential SPAC business combination. DCRC management was first made aware of the Solid Power process by Stifel, and by representatives of Riverstone, who were familiar with Solid Power through their network. Riverstone had previously engaged in discussions with Solid Power and conducted a due diligence review of Solid Power’s business and certain technical topics. Riverstone was subject to a nondisclosure agreement, dated as of December 14, 2020 (the “NDA”), with respect to Solid Power. The NDA applied to affiliates of Riverstone and did not contain a standstill provision. After further discussions, negotiations and the performance of extensive due diligence, on April 13, 2021, DCRC and Solid Power executed a non-binding letter of intent. Please see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Background of the Business Combination” for additional information.

 

Q:

What conditions must be satisfied to complete the business combination?

 

A:

There are several closing conditions in the Business Combination Agreement, including the approval by our stockholders of the Business Combination Proposal. For a summary of the conditions that must be satisfied or waived prior to completion of the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—The Business Combination Agreement—Conditions to Closing of the Business Combination.”

 

Q:

How will we be managed and governed following the business combination?

Immediately after the Closing, the DCRC Board will be divided into three separate classes, designated as follows:

 

   

Class I comprised of Erik Anderson and Robert M. Tichio;

 

   

Class II comprised of Douglas Campbell and Steven H. Goldberg; and

 

   

Class III comprised of David Jansen, Rainer Feurer and John Stephens.

It is anticipated that David Jansen will be designated Chair of the Board upon the Closing.

Please see the section entitled “Management After the Business Combination.”

 

Q:

Will DCRC obtain new financing in connection with the business combination?

 

A:

The New PIPE Investors have committed to purchase from DCRC 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $195,000,000 in the PIPE Financing.

 

Q:

What equity stake will our current stockholders and the holders of our Founder Shares hold in New Solid Power following the consummation of the business combination?

 

A:

We anticipate that, upon the Closing, the ownership of New Solid Power will be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 61.9% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

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the public stockholders will own 35,000,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 21.1% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 11.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 8,750,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which would be valued at approximately $106,837,500, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date of the special meeting and will constitute 5.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The number of shares and the interests set forth above (a) assume (i) that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, (ii) that there are no other issuances of equity interests of DCRC or Solid Power and (iii) that there are no exercises of Solid Power Options or Solid Power Warrants and (b) do not take into account DCRC warrants that will remain outstanding following the business combination and may be exercised at a later date. As a result of the business combination, the economic and voting interests of our public stockholders will decrease.

The ownership percentages with respect to New Solid Power set forth above do not take into account warrants to purchase Class A Common Stock that will remain outstanding immediately following the business combination, but do include the Founder Shares. If the facts are different than these assumptions, the percentage ownership retained by DCRC’s existing stockholders in New Solid Power following the business combination will be different. For example, if we assume that all outstanding 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants were exercisable and exercised following completion of the business combination and further assume that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, then the ownership of New Solid Power would be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 55.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the public stockholders will own 46,666,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 25.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 10.6% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 15,416,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which would be valued at approximately $188,237,504, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date of the special meeting and will constitute 8.4% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The public warrants and private placement warrants will become exercisable on the later of 30 days after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or 12 months from the closing of our Initial Public Offering and will expire five years after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or earlier upon their redemption or liquidation.

Please see the sections entitled “Summary of the Proxy Statement/Prospectus—Ownership of New Solid Power After the Closing” and “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” for further information.

 

Q:

Why is DCRC proposing the amendments to the Charter set forth in the Charter Proposals?

 

A:

DCRC is proposing amendments to the Charter to approve certain items required to effectuate the business combination and other matters the DCRC Board believes are appropriate for the operation of New Solid

 

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  Power, including providing for, among other things, (a) an increase in the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and 20,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock, and (ii) 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (A) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (B) 200,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, and (b) to (i) eliminate of certain provisions relating to an Initial Business Combination that will no longer be applicable to DCRC following the Closing, (ii) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (iii) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of the Proposed Second A&R Charter or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (iv) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (v) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (vi) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims. Under the Charter and Delaware law, stockholder approval is required in order to effect the Charter Proposals. See the sections entitled “Proposal No. 2—The Authorized Share Charter Proposal,” and “Proposal No. 3—The Additional Charter Proposal” for additional information.

 

Q:

Why is DCRC proposing the Nasdaq Proposal?

 

A:

DCRC is proposing the Nasdaq Proposal in order to comply with listing standards of the Nasdaq Capital Market, which require stockholder approval of certain transactions that result in the issuance of 20% or more of a company’s outstanding voting power or shares of common stock outstanding before the issuance of stock or securities. In connection with the business combination and PIPE Financing, we may issue to the Historical Rollover Stockholders and the New PIPE Investors, and reserve for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants, up to 158,661,127 shares of Class A Common Stock. Because we may issue 20% or more of our outstanding voting power and outstanding common stock in connection with the business combination, we are required to obtain stockholder approval of such issuances pursuant to listing standards of the Nasdaq Capital Market. See the section entitled “Proposal No. 4—The Nasdaq Proposal” for additional information.

 

Q:

Did the DCRC Board obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in determining whether or not to proceed with the business combination?

 

A:

No. The DCRC Board did not obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in connection with its determination to approve the business combination. DCRC’s officers and directors have substantial experience in evaluating the operating and financial merits of companies from a wide range of industries and concluded that their experience and backgrounds, together with the experience and sector expertise of DCRC’s advisors, enabled them to make the necessary analyses and determinations regarding the business combination. In addition, DCRC’s officers, directors and advisors have substantial experience with mergers and acquisitions. Accordingly, investors will be relying solely on the judgment of the DCRC Board in valuing Solid Power and assuming the risk that the DCRC Board may not have properly valued the business.

 

Q:

What are some of the positive and negative factors that the DCRC Board considered when determining to enter into the Business Combination Agreement and its rationale for approving the transaction?

 

A:

The factors considered by the DCRC Board include, but were not limited to, the following:

 

   

Competitive and Innovative Design. The DCRC Board considered Solid Power’s innovative and competitive all-solid-state battery design and the potential applications of the batteries across multiple industries.

 

 

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Value to Equity Investors. The DCRC Board considered Solid Power’s value to investors, determining that Solid Power is the industry leader for all-solid-state battery development and manufacturing.

 

   

Revenue Potential. The DCRC Board considered that Solid Power entered into non-exclusive JDAs with certain of its early investors, including Ford and BMW of North America LLC, to collaborate on the research and development of its all-solid-state battery cell. The terms of the JDAs generally require Solid Power to continue its research and development of all-solid-state battery cells and component materials such that Solid Power’s products are capable of being deployed in electric vehicles within the next few years as well as other research and development milestones.

 

   

Manufacturing Capabilities. The DCRC Board considered Solid Power’s demonstrated ability to manufacture electric vehicle-relevant battery cells in dimensions suitable for automotive applications using scalable manufacturing processes and Solid Power’s intention to license such manufacturing know-how to third party commercialization partners.

 

   

Due Diligence. The DCRC Board considered the results of DCRC’s due diligence investigation of Solid Power conducted by DCRC’s management team and its financial and legal advisors.

 

   

Terms of the Business Combination Agreement. The DCRC Board reviewed the financial and other terms of the Business Combination Agreement and determined that they were the product of arm’s-length negotiations among the parties.

 

   

Independent Director Role. DCRC’s independent directors took an active role in guiding DCRC management as DCRC evaluated and negotiated the proposed terms of the business combination. Following an active and detailed evaluation, the DCRC Board’s independent directors unanimously approved, as members of the DCRC Board, the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination.

 

   

Stockholder Approval. The DCRC Board considered the fact that, in connection with the business combination, DCRC stockholders have the option to (i) remain stockholders of the combined company, (ii) sell their shares on the open market or (iii) redeem their shares for the per share amount held in the Trust Account pursuant to the terms of our Charter.

 

   

Other Alternatives. The DCRC Board believed, after a thorough review of other business combination opportunities reasonably available to DCRC, that the business combination represented the best potential business combination for DCRC and the most attractive opportunity for DCRC based upon the process utilized to evaluate and assess other potential business combination targets. The DCRC Board believes that such process has not presented a better alternative.

In addition, the DCRC Board determined that the business combination satisfies the investment criteria that the DCRC Board identified in connection with the IPO. For more information, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Background of the Business Combination.”

In the course of its deliberations, the DCRC Board also considered a variety of uncertainties, risks and other potentially negative factors relevant to the business combination, including the following:

 

   

Developmental Stage Company Risk. The risk that Solid Power is an early-stage company, with a history of financial losses and that expects to incur significant expenses and continuing losses for the foreseeable future. As Solid Power scales from limited production of batteries to, ultimately, significant licensing of all-solid-state battery cells or sales of the sulfide-based solid electrolytes, it is difficult, if not impossible, to forecast Solid Power’s future results, and Solid Power has limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect Solid Power’s business.

 

   

Business Plan Risk. The risk that Solid Power may be unable to execute on its business model, which would have a material adverse effect on Solid Power’s operating results and business, would harm Solid Power’s reputation and could result in substantial liabilities that exceed its resources.

 

 

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Customer Risk. The risk that Solid Power may not be able to obtain binding licensing agreements or sales orders for its products.

 

   

Financing Risk. The risk that Solid Power may be unable to achieve sufficient sales or otherwise raise the necessary capital to implement its business plan and strategy. If Solid Power needs to raise additional funds, the risk that these funds may not be available on terms favorable to Solid Power or Solid Power’s stockholders, or at all when needed.

 

   

Competitive Risk. The risk that Solid Power faces significant competition and that its competitors may develop competing technologies more efficient or effective than Solid Power’s.

 

   

Supplier Risk. The risk that Solid Power may not be able to attain the supplies, such as lithium sulfide, NMC and manufacturing tools for its all-solid-state battery cells. If Solid Power is unable to enter into commercial agreements with its current suppliers or its replacement suppliers on favorable terms, or if these suppliers experience difficulties meeting Solid Power’s requirements, the development and commercial progression of its all-solid-state battery cells and related technologies may be delayed.

 

   

Intellectual Property Risk. The risk that Solid Power may not have adequate intellectual property rights to carry out its business, may need to defend itself against patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret or other intellectual property infringement or misappropriation claims, and may need to enforce its intellectual property rights from unauthorized use by third parties.

 

   

Regulatory Risk. The risks that are associated with Solid Power operating in the highly-regulated battery cell industry. Failure to comply with regulations or laws could subject Solid Power to significant regulatory risk, including the risk of litigation, regulatory actions and compliance issues that could subject Solid Power to significant fines, penalties, judgments, remediation costs, negative publicity and requirements resulting in increased expenses.

 

   

Public Company Risk. The risks that are associated with being a publicly traded company that is in its early, developmental stage.

 

   

Benefits May Not Be Achieved Risk. The risk that the potential benefits of the business combination may not be fully achieved or may not be achieved within the expected timeframe.

 

   

Redemption Risk. The risk that a significant number of DCRC stockholders elect to redeem their shares prior to the consummation of the business combination and pursuant to DCRC’s existing Charter, which would potentially make the business combination more difficult to complete or reduce the amount of cash available to the combined company to execute its business plan following the Closing.

 

   

Stockholder Vote Risk. The risk that DCRC’s stockholders may fail to provide the votes necessary to effect the business combination.

 

   

Litigation Risk. The risk of the possibility of litigation challenging the business combination or that an adverse judgment granting permanent injunctive relief could indefinitely enjoin consummation of the business combination.

 

   

Closing Risk. The risk that the Closing might not occur in a timely manner or that the Closing might not occur at all, despite DCRC’s efforts.

 

   

Closing Conditions Risk. The risk that completion of the business combination is conditioned on the satisfaction of certain closing conditions that are not within DCRC’s control.

 

   

Minority Position. The risk that DCRC’s stockholders will hold a minority position in the combined company.

 

   

No Third-Party Valuation Risk. The risk that DCRC did not obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in connection with the business combination.

 

 

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Fees, Expenses and Time Risk. The risk of incurring significant fees and expenses associated with completing the business combination and the substantial time and effort of management required to complete the business combination.

 

   

Other Risks. Various other risk factors associated with Solid Power’s business, as described in the section entitled “Risk Factors.”

In addition to considering the factors described above, the DCRC Board also considered that the officers and directors of DCRC may have interests in the business combination as individuals that are in addition to, and that may be different from, the interests of DCRC’s stockholders. DCRC’s independent directors reviewed and considered these interests during the negotiation of the business combination and in evaluating and unanimously approving, as members of the DCRC Board, the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination. For more information, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Interests of Certain Persons in the Business Combination.”

The DCRC Board concluded that the potential benefits that it expects DCRC and its stockholders to achieve as a result of the business combination outweigh the potentially negative factors associated with the business combination. Accordingly, the DCRC Board, based on its consideration of the specific factors listed above, unanimously (a) determined that the business combination and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement are fair to, and in the best interests of, DCRC’s stockholders, (b) approved, adopted and declared advisable the Business Combination Agreement and the transactions contemplated thereby and (c) recommended that the stockholders of DCRC approve each of the Proposals.

The above discussion of the material factors considered by the DCRC Board is not intended to be exhaustive but does set forth the principal factors considered by the DCRC Board.

 

Q:

What happens if I sell my shares of Class A Common Stock before the special meeting?

 

A:

The record date for the special meeting is earlier than the date that the business combination is expected to be completed. If you transfer your shares of Class A Common Stock after the record date, but before the special meeting, unless the transferee obtains from you a proxy to vote those shares, you will retain your right to vote at the special meeting. However, you will not be able to seek redemption of your shares of Class A Common Stock because you will no longer be able to deliver them for cancellation upon consummation of the business combination in accordance with the provisions described in this proxy statement/prospectus. If you transfer your shares of Class A Common Stock prior to the record date, you will have no right to vote those shares at the special meeting or seek redemption of those shares.

 

Q:

How has the announcement of the business combination affected the trading price of DCRC’s units, Class A Common Stock and warrants?

 

A:

On June 14, 2021, the last trading date before the public announcement of the business combination, DCRC’s public units, Class A Common Stock and public warrants closed at $13.47, $12.09 and $3.65, respectively. On                 , 2021 the trading date immediately prior to the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, DCRC’s public units, Class A Common Stock and warrants closed at $        , $         and $        , respectively.

 

Q:

Following the business combination, will DCRC’s securities continue to trade on a stock exchange?

 

A:

Yes. We have applied to begin the listing of our Class A Common Stock and public warrants on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the new symbols “SLDP” and “SLDPW,” respectively, following the Closing. We anticipate that the Class A Common Stock and warrants of the post-combination company will cease trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market at the end of the trading day on which Closing occurs and will commence trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market at the beginning of the trading day immediately following the day on which the Closing occurs.

Our units will automatically separate into the component securities upon consummation of the business combination and, as a result, will no longer trade as separate securities following the business combination.

 

 

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Q:

What vote is required to approve the Proposals presented at the special meeting?

 

A:

Approval of each of the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Adjournment Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote and actually cast thereon, voting as a single class. Approval of the Authorized Share Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of (i) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class, and (ii) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Additional Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class.

Approval of the Director Election Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of a plurality of the votes cast by holders of our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock at the special meeting and entitled to vote thereon, voting as a single class. This means that the seven director nominees will be elected if they receive more affirmative votes than any other nominee for the same position.

Stockholders may not cumulate their votes with respect to the election of directors. Assuming a valid quorum is established, abstentions will have no effect on the Director Election Proposal.

 

Q:

May DCRC’s Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates purchase public shares in connection with the business combination?

 

A:

In connection with the stockholder vote to approve the proposed business combination, our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors and any of their respective affiliates may privately negotiate to purchase public shares from stockholders who would have otherwise elected to have their shares redeemed in conjunction with a proxy solicitation pursuant to the proxy rules for a per share pro rata portion of the Trust Account. Our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors and any of their respective affiliates will not make any such purchases when they are in possession of any material non-public information not disclosed to the seller of such public shares or during a restricted period under Regulation M under the Exchange Act. Such a purchase could include a contractual acknowledgement that such stockholder, although still the record holder of such public shares, is no longer the beneficial owner thereof and therefore agrees not to exercise its redemption rights, and could include a contractual provision that directs such stockholder to vote such shares in a manner directed by the purchaser. In the event that our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates purchase public shares in privately negotiated transactions from public stockholders who have already elected to exercise their redemption rights, such selling stockholders would be required to revoke their prior elections to redeem their shares. Any such privately negotiated purchases may be effected at purchase prices that are in excess of the per share pro rata portion of the Trust Account.

 

Q:

How many votes do I have at the special meeting?

 

A:

Our stockholders are entitled to one vote at the special meeting for each share of Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock held of record as of October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting. As of the close of business on the record date, there were 43,710,000 outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock, which are held by our public stockholders and certain of our initial stockholders, and 40,000 outstanding shares of Class B Common Stock, which are held by one of our initial stockholders.

 

Q:

What constitutes a quorum at the special meeting?

 

A:

Holders of a majority in voting power of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock issued and outstanding and entitled to vote at the special meeting, virtually present or represented by proxy, constitute a

 

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  quorum. In the absence of a quorum, the chairman of the meeting has the power to adjourn the special meeting. As of the record date for the special meeting, 21,875,001 shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, in the aggregate, would be required to achieve a quorum. Abstentions will count as present for the purposes of establishing a quorum with respect to each Proposal.

 

Q:

How will DCRC’s Sponsor, directors and officers vote?

 

A:

Our Sponsor, directors and officers have agreed to vote any shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock owned by them in favor of the business combination. Currently, our initial stockholders own approximately 20% of our issued and outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, in the aggregate.

 

Q:

What interests do the current officers and directors have in the business combination?

 

A:

In considering the recommendation of the DCRC Board to vote in favor of the business combination, stockholders should be aware that, aside from their interests as stockholders, our Sponsor and certain of our directors and officers have interests in the business combination that are different from, or in addition to, those of other stockholders generally. Our directors were aware of and considered these interests, among other matters, in evaluating the business combination, and in recommending to stockholders that they approve the business combination. Stockholders should take these interests into account in deciding whether to approve the business combination. These interests include, among other things:

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor and independent directors hold an aggregate of 6,666,667 private placement warrants that would expire worthless if a business combination is not consummated, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $28,333,335, based on the closing price of our public warrants of $4.25 per warrant on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $18,333,335;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor may convert any working capital loans that it may make to us into up to an additional 1,000,000 private placement warrants, at the price of $1.50 per warrant;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed not to redeem any of the shares of our common stock held by them in connection with a stockholder vote to approve the business combination;

 

   

the fact that our initial stockholders paid an aggregate of $25,000 for the Founder Shares and that such securities will have a significantly higher value at the time of the business combination, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $106,837,500, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $106,812,500;

 

   

the fact that certain of DCRC’s officers and directors collectively own, directly or indirectly, a material interest in our Sponsor;

 

   

the fact that affiliates of our Sponsor own an aggregate of 1,660,417 shares of Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock, which at the Exchange Ratio, would be exchanged for 5,292,247 shares of our Class A Common Stock at the Closing;

 

   

the anticipated appointment of each of Erik Anderson, a member of the DCRC Board and DCRC’s Chief Executive Officer, and Robert Tichio, a member of the DCRC Board, as a director on the New Solid Power Board in connection with the closing of the business combination;

 

   

if the Trust Account is liquidated, including in the event we are unable to complete an Initial Business Combination within the required time period, our Sponsor has agreed to indemnify us to ensure that the proceeds in the Trust Account are not reduced below $10.00 per public share, or such lesser amount per public share as is in the Trust Account on the liquidation date, by the claims of (a) any third party

 

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(other than our independent public accountants) for services rendered or products sold to us or (b) a prospective target business with which we have entered into an acquisition agreement, but only if such a third party or target business has not executed a waiver of all rights to seek access to the Trust Account;

 

   

the fact that our independent directors own an aggregate of 360,000 Founder Shares, which if unrestricted and freely tradeable would be valued at approximately $4,395,600, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor will benefit from the completion of a business combination and may be incentivized to complete an acquisition of a less favorable target company or on terms less favorable to stockholders rather than liquidate;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor and its affiliates can earn a positive rate of return on their investment, even if other DCRC stockholders experience a negative rate of return in the post-business combination company;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, such as identifying potential target businesses and performing due diligence on suitable business combinations; and

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will lose their entire investment in us if an Initial Business Combination is not completed.

At the Closing, we anticipate that our Sponsor will own 6,367,353 private placement warrants and 8,390,000 shares of New Solid Power common stock. In addition, on October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. The note does not bear interest and is repayable in full upon consummation of an Initial Business Combination. If we do not complete an Initial Business Combination, the note will not be repaid and all amounts owed under it will be forgiven. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert all or a portion of the unpaid principal balance of the note into that number of warrants to purchase one share of Class A Common Stock equal to the principal amount of the note so converted divided by $1.50. The terms of these warrants will be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. The note is subject to customary events of default, the occurrence of which automatically trigger the unpaid principal balance of the note and all other sums payable with regard to the note becoming immediately due and payable.

Further, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, there has been no reimbursement to our Sponsor, officers or directors for any out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, and no such amounts have been incurred as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus. However, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, an affiliate of our Sponsor has incurred approximately $4.1 million of expenses on DCRC’s behalf, of which approximately $3.0 million has been repaid by DCRC to the affiliate of our Sponsor. The balance will be repaid by DCRC at the Closing.

Investors in our Sponsor, each of which contributed capital to our Sponsor in exchange for Founder Shares and private placement warrants, include entities affiliated with certain of our non-independent directors and officers. Specifically, Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen, Robert Tichio and Peter Haskopoulos are each affiliated with Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor Manager III, LLC (“Sponsor Manager”), and Erik Anderson is affiliated with WRG DCRC Investors, LLC (“WRG”), through which such DCRC directors and officers have an indirect economic interest in the private placement warrants and shares of New Solid Power common stock anticipated to be held by our Sponsor as of the completion of the business combination.

Our independent directors paid $1,028 in aggregate consideration for the 360,000 Founder Shares transferred to our independent directors by our Sponsor at the closing of our IPO. In addition, our independent directors purchased 299,314 private placement warrants at a price of $1.50 per warrant at the closing of our IPO.

 

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The table set forth below summarizes the interests of Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares along with (i) the total investment made in our Sponsor (or purchase price paid for the private placement warrants, in the case of our independent directors) by Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in exchange for their interests in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares and (ii) the value of such interests based on the closing price of the public warrants and Class A Common Stock as of October 29, 2021, all of which would be lost if an Initial Business Combination is not completed by us within the required time period:

 

Name of Holder

  DCRC
Position
  Total Purchase
Price / Capital
Contributions
    Number of
Private
Placement
Warrants
    Value of
Private
Placement
Warrants as
of October 29, 2021
    Number of
Founder
Shares
    Value of
Founder
Shares as
of October 29, 2021
 

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor Manager III, LLC1

  N/A   $ 7,923,040       5,268,801 3    $ 22,392,404 3      6,943,741     $ 84,783,078  

WRG DCRC Investors, LLC2

  N/A   $ 1,150,710       765,219     $ 3,252,181       1,008,759     $ 12,316,947  

James AC McDermott

  Director   $ 300,000       199,543     $ 848,058       240,000     $ 2,930,400  

Jennifer Aaker

  Director   $ 50,000       33,257     $ 141,342       40,000     $ 488,400  

Jane Kearns

  Director   $ 50,000       33,257     $ 141,342       40,000     $ 488,400  

Jeffrey Tepper

  Director   $ 50,000       33,257     $ 141,342       40,000     $ 488,400  

 

1 

DCRC directors Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen and Robert Tichio and Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Secretary Peter Haskopoulos each have an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through Sponsor Manager.

2 

DCRC Chief Executive Officer Erik Anderson has an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through WRG.

3 

On October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert the unpaid principal balance of the note into up to 1,000,000 warrants. The terms of these warrants would be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. If these 1,000,000 warrants were issued and outstanding and unrestricted and freely tradable as of October 29, 2021, they would have been valued at $4,250,000 based on the closing price of the public warrants as of October 29, 2021.

In addition, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that we renounce our interest in any corporate opportunity offered to any director or officer unless such opportunity is expressly offered to such person solely in his or her capacity as a director or officer of our company and such opportunity is one we are legally and contractually permitted to undertake and would otherwise be reasonable for us to pursue. We do not believe, however, that this waiver of the corporate opportunities doctrine has materially affected our search for an acquisition target or will materially affect our ability to complete our business combination.

 

Q:

What happens if I vote against the Business Combination Proposal?

 

A:

Under our Charter, if the Business Combination Proposal is not approved and we do not otherwise consummate an alternative business combination by March 26, 2023, we will be required to dissolve and liquidate the Trust Account by returning the then-remaining funds in such account to our public stockholders.

 

Q:

Do I have redemption rights?

 

A:

If you are a holder of public shares, you may elect to have your public shares redeemed for cash at the applicable redemption price per share equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (a) the aggregate amount on deposit in the Trust Account as of two business days prior to the consummation of the business combination, including interest

 

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  not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes, by (b) the total number of then outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock included as part of the units sold in the IPO; provided that we will not redeem any public shares to the extent that such redemption would result in DCRC having net tangible assets (as determined in accordance with Rule 3a51-1(g)(1) under the Exchange Act) of less than $5,000,001 unless our Class A Common Stock otherwise does not constitute “penny stock” as such term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 under the Exchange Act. Because we anticipate that the Class A Common Stock will be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market at the Closing, and such listing would mean that the Class A Common Stock would not constitute “penny stock” as such term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 under the Exchange Act, we do not anticipate the $5,000,001 net tangible asset threshold being applicable. A public stockholder, together with any of his, her or its affiliates or any other person with whom it is acting in concert or as a “group” (as defined under Section 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act), will be restricted from redeeming in the aggregate his, her or its shares or, if part of such a group, the group’s shares, in excess of 20% of the public shares (the “20% threshold”). Unlike some other blank check companies, other than the net tangible asset requirement and the 20% threshold described above, we have no specified maximum redemption threshold and there is no other limit on the number of public shares that you can redeem. Holders of our outstanding public warrants do not have redemption rights in connection with the business combination. Our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to waive their redemption rights with respect to any shares of our common stock they may hold in connection with the consummation of the business combination. For illustrative purposes, based on the fair value of cash and marketable securities held in the Trust Account as of June 30, 2021 of approximately $350.0 million, the estimated per share redemption price would have been approximately $10.00. Additionally, shares properly tendered for redemption will only be redeemed if the business combination is consummated; otherwise holders of such shares will only be entitled to a pro rata portion of the Trust Account (including interest but net of franchise and income taxes payable) (a) in connection with a stockholder vote to approve an amendment to our Charter that would affect the substance or timing of our obligation to redeem 100% of our public shares if we have not consummated an Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023, or with respect to any other provision relating to the rights of holders of Class A Common Stock or pre-Initial Business Combination activity, (b) in connection with the liquidation of the Trust Account or (c) if we subsequently complete a different business combination on or before March 26, 2023.

 

Q:

Will how I vote affect my ability to exercise redemption rights?

 

A:

No. You may exercise your redemption rights whether you vote your shares of Class A Common Stock for or against or abstain from voting on the Business Combination Proposal or any other proposal described in this proxy statement/prospectus. As a result, the business combination can be approved by stockholders who will redeem their shares and no longer remain stockholders.

 

Q:

How do I exercise my redemption rights?

 

A:

In order to exercise your redemption rights, you must (a) if you hold your shares of Class A Common Stock through units, elect to separate your units into the underlying public shares and public warrants prior to exercising your redemption rights with respect to the public shares, and (b) prior to 5:00 p.m., Eastern time, on December 3, 2021 (two business days before the special meeting), tender your shares physically or electronically and submit a request in writing that we redeem your public shares for cash to Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, our transfer agent, at the following address:

Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company

1 State Street, 30th Floor

New York, New York 10004-1561

Attention: Mark Zimkind

Email: mzimkind@continentalstock.com

 

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A public stockholder, together with any of his, her or its affiliates or any other person with whom it is acting in concert or as a “group” (as defined in Section 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act), will be restricted from seeking redemption rights with respect to his, her or its shares or, if part of such a group, the group’s shares, in excess of the 20% threshold. Accordingly, all public shares in excess of the 20% threshold beneficially owned by a public stockholder or group will not be redeemed for cash. Stockholders seeking to exercise their redemption rights and opting to deliver physical certificates should allot sufficient time to obtain physical certificates from the transfer agent and time to effect delivery. It is our understanding that stockholders should generally allot at least two weeks to obtain physical certificates from the transfer agent.

However, we do not have any control over this process and it may take longer than two weeks. Stockholders who hold their shares in street name will have to coordinate with their bank, broker or other nominee to have the shares certificated or delivered electronically.

Holders of our outstanding units must separate the underlying public shares and public warrants prior to exercising redemption rights with respect to the public shares. If you hold units registered in your own name, you must deliver the certificate for such units or deliver such units electronically to Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company with written instructions to separate such units into public shares and public warrants. This must be completed far enough in advance to permit the mailing of the public share certificates or electronic delivery of the public shares back to you so that you may then exercise your redemption rights with respect to the public shares following the separation of such public shares from the units.

If a broker, dealer, commercial bank, trust company or other nominee holds your units, you must instruct such nominee to separate your units. Your nominee must send written instructions by facsimile to Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company. Such written instructions must include the number of units to be split and the nominee holding such units. Your nominee must also initiate electronically, using The Depository Trust Company’s (“DTC”) DWAC (deposit withdrawal at custodian) system, a withdrawal of the relevant units and a deposit of the corresponding number of public shares and public warrants. This must be completed far enough in advance to permit your nominee to exercise your redemption rights with respect to the public shares following the separation of such public shares from the units. While this is typically done electronically on the same business day, you should allow at least one full business day to accomplish the separation. If you fail to cause your public shares to be separated in a timely manner, you will likely not be able to exercise your redemption rights.

Any demand for redemption, once made, may be withdrawn at any time until the deadline for exercising redemption requests and thereafter, with our consent, until the vote is taken with respect to the business combination. If you delivered your shares for redemption to the transfer agent and decide within the required timeframe not to exercise your redemption rights, you may request that the transfer agent return the shares (physically or electronically). You may make such request by contacting our transfer agent at the email address or address listed under the question “Who can help answer my questions?” below.

 

Q:

What are the material U.S. federal income tax consequences to the DCRC shareholders as a result of the Merger?

 

A:

DCRC stockholders will retain their shares of Class A Common Stock, which will be re-designated as “common stock, par value $0.0001,” will not receive any merger consideration and will not receive any additional shares of Class A Common Stock in the Merger. As a result, there will be no material U.S. federal income tax consequences to the current DCRC stockholders as a result of the Merger, regardless of whether the Merger qualifies as a “reorganization” within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Code. Furthermore, although the Merger is intended to qualify as a “reorganization” within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Code, and DCRC and Solid Power intend to report the Merger consistent with such qualification, such treatment is not a condition to DCRC or Solid Power’s obligation to complete the Merger.

 

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Q:

What are the material U.S. federal income tax consequences of the Merger to Solid Power stockholders?

 

A:

The parties intend for the Merger to qualify as a “reorganization” within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Code for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Provided that the Merger qualifies as a reorganization, no gain or loss will generally be recognized by a U.S. Holder of Solid Power Stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes on the exchange of its shares of Solid Power Stock for Class A Common Stock in the Merger. For a more complete discussion of the material U.S. federal income tax consequences of the Merger, please carefully review the information set forth in the section titled “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations of the Business Combination—Tax Treatment of U.S. Holders of Solid Power Stock” of this proxy statement/prospectus. The tax consequences of the Merger to any particular stockholder will depend on that stockholder’s particular facts and circumstances. Accordingly, Solid Power stockholders are urged to consult with, and rely solely upon, their own tax advisors as to the specific tax consequences of the Merger, including the effects of U.S. federal, state or local, or non-U.S. tax laws.

 

Q:

What are the U.S. federal income tax consequences of exercising my redemption rights?

 

A:

The receipt of cash by a holder of Class A Common Stock in redemption of such stock will be a taxable event for U.S. federal income tax purposes in the case of a U.S. Holder (as defined below) and could be a taxable event for U.S. federal income tax purposes in the case of a Non-U.S. Holder (as defined below). Please see the discussion below under the caption “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of U.S. Holders” or “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of Non-U.S. Holders,” as applicable, for additional information. All holders considering the exercise of their redemption rights should consult with, and rely solely upon, their own tax advisors with respect to the U.S. federal income tax consequences of exercising such redemption rights.

 

Q:

If I am a warrantholder, can I exercise redemption rights with respect to my warrants?

 

A:

No. The holders of our warrants have no redemption rights with respect to our warrants.

 

Q:

How do the public warrants differ from the private placement warrants, and what are the related risks for any public warrant holders post business combination?

 

A:

The private placement warrants (including the shares of Class A Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the private placement warrants) are not transferable, assignable or salable until 30 days after the completion of our Initial Business Combination (except, among other limited exceptions, to our officers and directors and other persons or entities affiliated with our Sponsor), and they will not be redeemable by us (except as described under “Description of Securities—Warrants—Redemption of Warrants for Cash When the Price Per share of Class A Common Stock Equals or Exceeds $10.00”) so long as they are held by the initial purchasers of the private placement warrants or their permitted transferees. The initial purchasers, or their permitted transferees, have the option to exercise the private placement warrants on a cashless basis. Otherwise, the private placement warrants have terms and provisions that are identical to those of the public warrants, including as to exercise price, exercisability and exercise period. If the private placement warrants are held by holders other than the initial purchasers or their permitted transferees, the private placement warrants will be redeemable by us in all redemption scenarios and exercisable by the holders on the same basis as the public warrants.

Following the business combination, we may redeem public warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to the public warrant holders, thereby making such warrants worthless. More specifically:

 

   

We have the ability to redeem outstanding public warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.01 per warrant, provided that the last sales price of the

 

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Class A Common Stock has been at least $18.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within the 30 trading-day period ending on the third business day prior to the date on which we give notice of such redemption and provided certain other conditions are met.

 

   

We also have the ability to redeem outstanding public warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.10 per warrant if, among other things, the last sale price of the Class A Common Stock equals or exceeds $10.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) on the trading day prior to the date on which notice of the redemption is given. Historical trading prices for the Class A Common Stock have exceeded the $10.00 per share threshold at which the public warrants would become redeemable. In such a case, the holders will be able to exercise their warrants prior to redemption for a number of shares of Class A Common Stock determined by reference to a make-whole table. Please see “Description of Securities—Warrants—Redemption of Warrants for Cash When the Price Per share of Class A Common Stock Equals or Exceeds $10.00.” The value received upon exercise of the public warrants (1) may be less than the value the holders would have received if they had exercised their public warrants at a later time where the underlying share price is higher and (2) may not compensate the holders for the value of the public warrants, including because the number of shares received is capped at 0.361 shares of Class A Common Stock per whole warrant (subject to adjustment) irrespective of the remaining life of the public warrants.

In each case, we may only call the public warrants for redemption upon a minimum of 30 days’ prior written notice of redemption to each public warrant holder.

Redemption of the outstanding public warrants could force holders of the public warrants (i) to exercise public warrants and pay the exercise price therefor at a time when it may be disadvantageous for such holders to do so, (ii) to sell public warrants at the then-current market price when they might otherwise wish to hold their public warrants or (iii) to accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding public warrants are called for redemption, is likely to be substantially less than the market value of the public warrants.

 

Q:

Do I have appraisal rights if I object to the proposed business combination?

 

A:

No. There are no appraisal rights available to holders of Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock in connection with the business combination.

 

Q:

What happens to the funds deposited in the Trust Account after consummation of the business combination?

 

A:

If the Business Combination Proposal is approved, we intend to use a portion of the funds held in the Trust Account to pay (a) a portion of our aggregate costs, fees and expenses in connection with the consummation of the business combination, (b) tax obligations and deferred underwriting discounts and commissions from the IPO and (c) for any redemptions of public shares. The remaining balance in the Trust Account, together with PIPE Proceeds, will be used for general corporate purposes of New Solid Power. See the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal” for additional information.

 

Q:

What happens if the business combination is not consummated or is terminated?

 

A:

There are certain circumstances under which the Business Combination Agreement may be terminated. See the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—The Business Combination Agreement—Termination” for additional information regarding the parties’ specific termination rights. In accordance with our Charter, if an Initial Business Combination is not consummated by March 26, 2023, we will (a) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up, (b) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than ten business days thereafter subject to lawfully available funds therefor, redeem the public

 

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  shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes (less up to $100,000 of such net interest to pay dissolution expenses and net of taxes payable), divided by the number of then-outstanding public shares, which redemption will completely extinguish public stockholders’ rights as stockholders (including the right to receive further liquidating distributions, if any), subject to applicable law, and (c) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of our remaining stockholders and the DCRC Board, dissolve and liquidate, subject in each case to our obligations under Delaware law to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law.

We expect that the amount of any distribution our public stockholders will be entitled to receive upon our dissolution will be approximately the same as the amount they would have received if they had redeemed their shares in connection with the business combination, subject in each case to our obligations under the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (“DGCL”) to provide for claims of creditors and other requirements of applicable law. Holders of our Founder Shares are not entitled to liquidating distributions with respect to those shares.

In the event of liquidation, there will be no distribution with respect to our outstanding warrants. Accordingly, in such an event, the warrants will expire worthless.

 

Q:

When is the business combination expected to be consummated?

 

A:

It is currently anticipated that the business combination will be consummated promptly following the special meeting of our stockholders to be held on December 7, 2021, provided that all the requisite stockholder approvals are obtained and other conditions to the consummation of the business combination have been satisfied or waived. For a description of the conditions for the completion of the business combination, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—The Business Combination Agreement—Conditions to Closing of the Business Combination.”

 

Q:

What do I need to do now?

 

A:

You are urged to read carefully and consider the information contained in this proxy statement/prospectus, including the section entitled “Risk Factors” and the annexes attached to this proxy statement/prospectus, and to consider how the business combination will affect you as a stockholder. You should then vote as soon as possible in accordance with the instructions provided in this proxy statement/prospectus and on the enclosed proxy card or, if you hold your shares through a brokerage firm, bank or other nominee, on the voting instruction form provided by the broker, bank or nominee.

 

Q:

How do I vote?

 

A:

If you were a holder of record of Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting of our stockholders, you may vote with respect to the proposals online at the special meeting or by completing, signing, dating and returning the enclosed proxy card in the postage-paid envelope provided. If you hold your shares in “street name,” which means your shares are held of record by a broker, bank or other nominee, you should follow the instructions provided by your broker, bank or nominee to ensure that votes related to the shares you beneficially own are properly counted. In this regard, you must provide the record holder of your shares with instructions on how to vote your shares or, if you wish to virtually attend the special meeting and vote online, obtain a proxy from your broker, bank or nominee.

 

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Q:

What will happen if I abstain from voting or fail to vote at the special meeting?

 

A:

At the special meeting, we will count a properly executed proxy marked “ABSTAIN” with respect to a particular proposal as present for purposes of determining whether a quorum is present. For purposes of approval, failure to vote or an abstention will have no effect on the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal, the Director Election Proposal or the Adjournment Proposal, but will have the same effect as a vote AGAINST the Charter Proposals.

 

Q:

What will happen if I sign and submit my proxy card without indicating how I wish to vote?

 

A:

Signed and dated proxies received by us without an indication of how the stockholder intends to vote on a proposal will be voted “FOR” each Proposal (or in the case of the Director Election Proposal, “FOR ALL NOMINEES”) being submitted to a vote of the stockholders at the special meeting.

 

Q:

If I am not going to attend the special meeting online, should I submit my proxy card instead?

 

A:

Yes. Whether you plan to attend the special meeting or not, please read the enclosed proxy statement/prospectus carefully, and vote your shares by completing, signing, dating and returning the enclosed proxy card in the postage-paid envelope provided.

 

Q:

If my shares are held in “street name,” will my broker, bank or nominee automatically vote my shares for me?

 

A:

No. Under the rules of various national and regional securities exchanges, your broker, bank or nominee cannot vote your shares with respect to non-discretionary matters unless you provide instructions on how to vote in accordance with the information and procedures provided to you by your broker, bank or nominee. We believe the Proposals presented to our stockholders will be considered non-discretionary and therefore your broker, bank or nominee cannot vote your shares without your instruction. Your bank, broker or other nominee can vote your shares only if you provide instructions on how to vote. You should instruct your broker to vote your shares in accordance with directions you provide.

 

Q:

May I change my vote after I have submitted my executed proxy card?

 

A:

Yes. You may change your vote by sending a later-dated, signed proxy card to us at the address listed below so that it is received by us prior to the special meeting or by attending the special meeting online and voting there. You also may revoke your proxy by sending a notice of revocation to us, which must be received prior to the special meeting.

 

Q:

What should I do if I receive more than one set of voting materials?

 

A:

You may receive more than one set of voting materials, including multiple copies of this proxy statement/prospectus and multiple proxy cards or voting instruction cards. For example, if you hold your shares in more than one brokerage account, you will receive a separate voting instruction card for each brokerage account in which you hold shares. If you are a holder of record and your shares are registered in more than one name, you will receive more than one proxy card. Please complete, sign, date and return each proxy card and voting instruction card that you receive in order to cast your vote with respect to all of your shares.

 

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Q:

Who can help answer my questions?

 

A:

If you have questions about the proposals or if you need additional copies of the proxy statement/prospectus or the enclosed proxy card you should contact:

Peter Haskopoulos, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Secretary

c/o Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III

2744 Sand Hill Road, Suite 100

Menlo Park, California 94025

Email: info@dcrbplus.com

Tel: (212) 993-0076

You may also contact our proxy solicitor at:

Morrow Sodali LLC

470 West Avenue

Stamford, Connecticut 06902

Telephone: (800) 662-5200

(banks and brokers call collect at (203) 658-9400)

Email: DCRC.info@investor.morrowsodali.com

To obtain timely delivery, our stockholders must request the materials no later than five business days prior to the special meeting.

You may also obtain additional information about us from documents filed with the SEC by following the instructions in the section entitled “Where You Can Find Additional Information.”

If you intend to seek redemption of your public shares, you will need to send a letter demanding redemption and deliver your shares (either physically or electronically) to our transfer agent at least two business days prior to the special meeting in accordance with the procedures detailed under the question “How do I exercise my redemption rights?” If you have questions regarding the certification of your position or delivery of your shares, please contact:

Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company

1 State Street, 30th Floor

New York, New York 10004-1561

Attention: Mark Zimkind

Email: mzimkind@continentalstock.com

 

Q:

Who will solicit and pay the cost of soliciting proxies?

 

A:

The DCRC Board is soliciting your proxy to vote your shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock on all matters scheduled to come before the special meeting. We will pay the cost of soliciting proxies for the special meeting. We have engaged Morrow Sodali LLC to assist in the solicitation of proxies for the special meeting. We have agreed to pay Morrow Sodali LLC a fee of $32,500, plus disbursements. We will reimburse Morrow Sodali LLC for reasonable out-of-pocket expenses and will indemnify Morrow Sodali LLC and its affiliates against certain claims, liabilities, losses, damages and expenses. We will also reimburse banks, brokers and other custodians, nominees and fiduciaries representing beneficial owners of shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock for their expenses in forwarding soliciting materials to beneficial owners of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock and in obtaining voting instructions from those owners. Our directors and officers may also solicit proxies by telephone, by facsimile, by mail, on the Internet or in person. They will not be paid any additional amounts for soliciting proxies.

 

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SUMMARY OF THE PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS

This summary highlights selected information from this proxy statement/prospectus and does not contain all of the information that is important to you. To better understand the business combination and the proposals to be considered at the special meeting, you should read this entire proxy statement/prospectus carefully, including the annexes. See also the section entitled “Where You Can Find Additional Information.”

Parties to the Business Combination

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III

DCRC is a Delaware corporation formed for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar business combination involving DCRC and one or more businesses. Upon the Closing, we intend to change our name from “Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Corporation III” to “Solid Power, Inc.”

Our Class A Common Stock, public warrants, and units, consisting of one share of Class A Common Stock and one-third of one warrant, are traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the ticker symbols “DCRC,” “DCRCW” and “DCRCU,” respectively. We have applied to begin the listing of our Class A Common Stock and public warrants on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the new symbols “SLDP” and “SLDPW,” respectively, following the Closing. We anticipate that the Class A Common Stock and warrants of the post-combination company will cease trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market at the end of the trading day on which Closing occurs and will commence trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market at the beginning of the trading day immediately following the day on which the Closing occurs. Upon the Closing, each share of Class A Common Stock will be re-designated as “common stock, par value $0.0001.” The units will automatically separate into the component securities upon consummation of the business combination and, as a result, will no longer trade as a separate security.

The mailing address of our principal executive office is 2744 Sand Hill Road, Suite 100, Menlo Park, California 94025, and our telephone number is (212) 993-0076.

Solid Power, Inc.

Solid Power is developing all-solid-state battery cell technology that replaces the liquid or gel polymer electrolyte used in conventional lithium-ion battery cells with a sulfide-based solid electrolyte, and is focused solely on the development and commercialization of all-solid-state battery cells and solid electrolyte materials, primarily for the fast-growing battery-powered electric vehicle market. The world has started its transition to battery-powered electric vehicles. Current liquid electrolyte-based lithium-ion battery technology allowed electric vehicles to secure roughly 2% of new vehicle sales in 2020. BloombergNEF predicts by the mid-2030s approximately 50% of all new auto sales will be fully electric. This corresponds to an estimated $305 billion total addressable market based on projected new auto sales in 2035, assuming a 70 kWh pack size and a cost of $85/kWh.

In recent years, liquid electrolyte-based lithium-ion technology made considerable strides to increase stored energy while lowering costs; however, current technology is approaching its practical limits. To reach mass adoption where a majority of new passenger vehicles are electrified, battery cell technology must take a big step forward. We are developing our All-Solid-State Platform to address these needs.

We believe our All-Solid-State Platform will be able to meet the performance and cost demands from both consumers and automotive OEMs and outperform the best performing liquid electrolyte-based lithium-ion technologies of today and tomorrow. We are developing our all-solid-state battery cell technology with the goal to improve, among other things:

 

   

safety of electric vehicle batteries through the removal of flammable and volatile liquids and gels from the battery cells;


 

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energy density, a measure of the energy stored by the battery cell relative to its volume, by enabling higher capacity electrodes that are otherwise not considered viable in a traditional lithium-ion battery cell;

 

   

calendar life – how long a battery cell can last before seeing significant degradation, especially at elevated temperature – as compared to current-generation lithium-ion; and

 

   

cost, through simplifying the manufacturing process and removal or reduction of battery pack cooling systems and pack-level safety features typically seen in traditional lithium-ion battery packs.

We have demonstrated that our all-solid-state battery cell technology can be manufactured in a high-throughput manner using existing lithium-ion battery cell manufacturing techniques and equipment. We believe that our technology could power longer range, lower cost, and safer electric vehicles, resulting in broader electric vehicle market adoption.

The mailing address of Solid Power’s principal executive office is 486 S. Pierce Avenue, Suite E, Louisville, Colorado 80027, and its telephone number is (303) 219-0720.

For more information about Solid Power, see the sections entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Solid Power” and “Information About Solid Power.”

The Business Combination

On June 15, 2021, we entered into the Business Combination Agreement with Merger Sub and Solid Power. Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger. After giving effect to the merger, Solid Power will become a wholly owned subsidiary of New Solid Power.

Solid Power will cause each share of Solid Power Preferred Stock that is issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time to be automatically converted, effective immediately prior to the Effective Time, into a number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock, at the then effective conversion rate as calculated pursuant to the Solid Power Charter (the “Conversion”). After the Conversion, such converted shares of Solid Power Preferred Stock will no longer be outstanding and will cease to exist.

At the Effective Time, by virtue of the Merger and without any action on the part of DCRC, Merger Sub, Solid Power or the holders of any of Solid Power’s securities:

 

   

each share of Solid Power Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time (including shares of Solid Power Common Stock resulting from the Conversion, but excluding Solid Power Restricted Stock and excluding any Dissenting Shares (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement)) will be canceled and converted into the right to receive the number of shares of Class A Common Stock equal to the Exchange Ratio;

 

   

all shares of Solid Power Common Stock held in treasury of Solid Power will be canceled without any conversion thereof and no payment or distribution will be made with respect to such Solid Power Common Stock;

 

   

each share of Merger Sub Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be converted into and exchanged for one validly issued, fully paid and nonassessable share of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Surviving Corporation;

 

   

each Solid Power Warrant (a) to the extent terminated, expired or exercised immediately prior to the Effective Time, either voluntarily prior to the Effective Time or in accordance with its terms in

 

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connection with the Transactions, will no longer be deemed outstanding and any shares of Company Common Stock issuable in connection therewith shall be treated as described above and (b) to the extent outstanding and unexercised immediately prior to the Effective Time will automatically be converted into a warrant (each such resulting warrant, an “Assumed Warrant”) to acquire a number of shares of Class A Common Stock equal to (i) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to the applicable Solid Power Warrant multiplied by (ii) the Exchange Ratio, rounding the resulting number down to the nearest whole number of shares of Class A Common Stock, at an adjusted price equal to (x) the per share exercise price for the shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to the applicable Solid Power Warrant, as in effect immediately prior to the Effective Time, divided by (y) the Exchange Ratio, rounding the resulting exercise price up to the nearest whole cent;

 

   

each Solid Power Option, whether or not exercisable and whether or not vested, outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be converted into an option to purchase a number of shares of Class A Common Stock (such option, an “Exchanged Option”) equal to the product (rounded down to the nearest whole number) of (x) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to such Solid Power Option immediately prior to the Effective Time and (y) the Exchange Ratio, at an exercise price per share (rounded up to the nearest whole cent) equal to (A) the exercise price per share of such Solid Power Option immediately prior to the Effective Time divided by (B) the Exchange Ratio; provided, however, that the exercise price and number of shares of Class A Common Stock shall be determined in a manner consistent with the requirements of Section 409A of the Code; provided, further, that in the case of any Exchanged Option to which Section 422 of the Code applies, the exercise price and the number of shares of Class A Common Stock purchasable pursuant to such option shall be determined in accordance with the foregoing, subject to such adjustments as are necessary in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 424(a) of the Code; and

 

   

each award of Solid Power Restricted Stock that is outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be released and extinguished in exchange for an award covering a number of restricted shares of Class A Common Stock (such award of restricted stock, “Exchanged Restricted Stock”) equal to the product (rounded down to the nearest whole number) of (x) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to such award of Solid Power Restricted Stock immediately prior to the Effective Time and (y) the Exchange Ratio.

Pursuant to the terms of the Charter, each share of Class B Common Stock outstanding prior to the Effective Time will convert into one share of Class A Common Stock at the Closing. All of the shares of Class B Common Stock converted into shares of Class A Common Stock will no longer be outstanding and will cease to exist, and each holder of such Class B Common Stock will thereafter cease to have any rights with respect to such securities.

For more information about the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination and other transactions contemplated thereby, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal.”

Conditions to the Closing

The obligations of Solid Power, DCRC and Merger Sub to consummate the business combination, including the Merger, are subject to the satisfaction or waiver of certain conditions, including, but not limited to (a) the written consent of the requisite stockholders of Solid Power in favor of the approval and adoption of the Business Combination Agreement and the Merger and all other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement (the “Written Consent”) having been delivered to DCRC, (b) approval and adoption of certain of the

 

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Proposals by DCRC’s stockholders, (c) the absence of any law or order that makes the business combination illegal or otherwise prohibits consummation of the business combination, (d) expiration or termination under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended (the “HSR Act”) (the waiting period under the HSR Act expired on August 9, 2021), (e) listing of the Class A Common Stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market or another exchange mutually agreed to by the parties, as of the Closing Date, (f) the Registration Statement having been declared effective under the Securities Act and no stop orders or suspension proceedings having been initiated or threatened by the SEC, (g) DCRC having at least $5,000,001 of net tangible assets following the exercise of redemption rights in accordance with the Charter and after giving effect to the PIPE Financing or the Class A Common Stock not constituting “penny stock” as such term is defined in the Exchange Act, and (h) DCRC shall have provided an opportunity to DCRC’s stockholders to have their Class A Common Stock redeemed according to the Charter, the Investment Management Trust Agreement, dated as of March 23, 2021, between DCRC and Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company (the “Trust Agreement”) and this proxy statement/prospectus.

The obligations of Solid Power to consummate the business combination, including the Merger, are also subject to the satisfaction or waiver of certain additional conditions, including, but not limited to, (a) the representations and warranties of DCRC and Merger Sub being true and correct to the standards applicable to such representations and warranties, (b) each of the covenants of DCRC and Merger Sub having been performed or complied in all material respects, (c) the absence of a DCRC Material Adverse Effect (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement), (d) DCRC having made all necessary and appropriate arrangements to have all of the funds held in the Trust Account disbursed to DCRC immediately prior to the Effective Time, and all such funds released from the Trust Account being available for immediate use to DCRC in respect of all or a portion of the payment obligations set forth in the Business Combination Agreement and the payment of DCRC’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination and (e) as of the Closing, after consummation of the PIPE Financing and after distribution of the funds in the Trust Account pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, DCRC having unrestricted cash on hand equal to or in excess of $300,000,000 (without, for the avoidance of doubt, taking into account any transaction fees, costs and expenses paid or required to be paid in connection with the business combination and the PIPE Financing).

Regulatory Matters

Neither DCRC nor Solid Power is aware of any material regulatory approvals or actions that are required for completion of the business combination other than as required under the HSR Act. The parties have filed a premerger notification under the HSR Act. It is presently contemplated that if any additional regulatory approvals or actions are required, those approvals or actions will be sought. There can be no assurance, however, that any such additional approvals or actions will be obtained.

Other Agreements

Stockholder Support Agreement

In connection with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, on June 15, 2021, DCRC, Solid Power, and certain stockholders of Solid Power entered into a Stockholder Support Agreement (the “Stockholder Support Agreement”) pursuant to which, among other things, such stockholders agreed to vote all of their shares of Solid Power Common Stock and Solid Power Preferred Stock in favor of the approval and adoption of the business combination, including agreeing to execute the Written Consent within five business days of the Registration Statement becoming effective. Additionally, such stockholders have agreed, among other things, not to, prior to the Effective Time, (a) transfer any of their shares of Solid Power Common Stock and Solid Power Preferred Stock (or enter into any arrangement with respect thereto), subject to certain customary exceptions, or (b) enter into any voting arrangement that is inconsistent with the Stockholder Support Agreement.


 

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Such stockholders also agreed not to transfer any of their shares of Class A Common Stock received in the Merger, or upon exercise of Assumed Warrants, Exchanged Options or Exchanged Restricted Stock received in the Merger, for a period of the shorter of (i) six months following the Closing and (ii) the termination, expiration or waiver of the lock-up period covering the Sponsor’s Class A Common Stock, subject to certain customary exceptions. Such restrictions on transfer will be set forth in the bylaws DCRC will adopt immediately prior to the Closing, which will apply to all investors of Solid Power that receive securities of DCRC in connection with the Merger; provided, however, that Solid Power agreed in the Stockholder Support Agreement that any waiver or termination of such lock-up period with respect to the Class A Common Stock held by BMW Holding B.V. (“BMW Holding”), Ford, Volta Energy Storage Fund I, LP, Volta SPV SPW, LLC, Volta SPW Co-Investment, LP or any of their respective affiliates (the “Covered Group”) shall be deemed to be a proportional waiver or termination of the lock-up period with respect to the Class A Common Stock owned by the other members of the Covered Group.

For more information about the Stockholder Support Agreement, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—Stockholder Support Agreement.”

Sponsor Letter

In connection with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, on June 15, 2021, the Sponsor and certain directors of DCRC entered into a letter agreement with Solid Power and DCRC (the “Sponsor Letter”), pursuant to which, among other things, the Sponsor and such directors agreed to (i) waive the anti-dilution rights set forth in the Charter with respect to the Founder Shares held by them, (ii) comply with the lock-up provisions in the Letter Agreement, dated March 23, 2021, by and among DCRC, the Sponsor and DCRC’s directors and officers, (iii) vote all the shares of Class A Common Stock and Founder Shares held by them in favor of the adoption and approval of the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination and (iv) not redeem any shares of DCRC Class A Common Stock owned by them in connection with such stockholder approval.

For more information about the Sponsor Letter, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—Sponsor Letter.”

A&R Registration Rights Agreement

In connection with the Closing, that certain Registration Rights Agreement dated March 23, 2021 (the “IPO Registration Rights Agreement”) will be amended and restated and DCRC, certain persons and entities holding securities of DCRC prior to the Closing (the “Initial Holders”) and certain persons and entities receiving Class A Common Stock pursuant to the Merger (the “New Holders” and together with the Initial Holders, the “Reg Rights Holders”) will enter into that amended and restated IPO Registration Rights Agreement attached as an exhibit to the Business Combination Agreement (the “A&R Registration Rights Agreement”). Pursuant to the A&R Registration Rights Agreement, DCRC will agree that, within 30 days after the Closing, DCRC will file with the SEC (at DCRC’s sole cost and expense) a registration statement registering the resale of certain securities held by or issuable to the Reg Rights Holders (the “Resale Registration Statement”), and DCRC will use its reasonable best efforts to have the Resale Registration Statement declared effective as promptly as reasonably practicable after the filing thereof. In certain circumstances, the Reg Rights Holders can demand DCRC’s assistance with underwritten offerings and block trades, and the Reg Rights Holders will be entitled to certain piggyback registration rights. The A&R Registration Rights Agreement does not provide for the payment of any cash penalties by DCRC if it fails to satisfy any of its obligations under the A&R Registration Rights Agreement.

For more information about the A&R Registration Rights Agreement, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—A&R Registration Rights Agreement.”

 

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Proposed Second Amended and Restated Charter

Pursuant to the terms of the Business Combination Agreement, at the Closing, we will amend and restate, effective as of the Effective Time, our Charter to, among other things, (a) increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and 20,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock, and (ii) 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (A) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (B) 200,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock; (b) eliminate certain provisions in the Charter relating to an Initial Business Combination that will no longer be applicable to us following the Closing; (c) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (d) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of the Proposed Second A&R Charter or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (e) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (f) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (g) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims.

For more information about the amendments to our Charter, see the sections entitled “Proposal No. 2—The Authorized Share Charter Proposal” and “Proposal No. 3—The Additional Charter Proposal.”

PIPE Financing

In connection with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, on June 15, 2021, DCRC and Solid Power entered into separate subscription agreements (collectively, the “Signing Subscription Agreements”) with the Signing PIPE Investors, pursuant to which the Signing PIPE Investors agreed to purchase, and DCRC agreed to sell to the Signing PIPE Investors, an aggregate of 16,500,000 PIPE Shares for a purchase price of $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $165,000,000, in the PIPE Financing. Additionally, on October 27, 2021, DCRC and Solid Power entered into a subscription agreement (the “Additional Subscription Agreement” and, together with the Signing Subscription Agreements, the “Subscription Agreements”) with the Additional PIPE Investor, pursuant to which the Additional PIPE Investor agreed to purchase, and DCRC agreed to sell to the Additional PIPE Investor, 3,000,000 PIPE Shares for a purchase price of $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $30,000,000, in the PIPE Financing, which resulted in aggregate Subscription Agreements of $195,000,000.

The closing of the sale of the PIPE Shares pursuant to the Subscription Agreements is contingent upon, among other customary closing conditions, the concurrent consummation of the business combination. The purpose of the PIPE Financing is to raise additional capital for use by the combined company following the Closing.

Pursuant to the Subscription Agreements, DCRC agreed that, within 30 calendar days after the Closing Date, DCRC will file with the SEC (at DCRC’s sole cost and expense) a registration statement registering the resale of the PIPE Shares (the “PIPE Resale Registration Statement”), and DCRC will use its commercially reasonable efforts to have the PIPE Resale Registration Statement declared effective as soon as practicable after the filing thereof.

For more information about the Subscription Agreements, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—PIPE Financing.”


 

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Interests of Certain Persons in the Business Combination

In considering the recommendation of the DCRC Board to vote in favor of the business combination, stockholders should be aware that, aside from their interests as stockholders, our Sponsor and certain of our directors and officers have interests in the business combination that are different from, or in addition to, those of other stockholders generally. Our directors were aware of and considered these interests, among other matters, in evaluating the business combination, and in recommending to stockholders that they approve the business combination. Stockholders should take these interests into account in deciding whether to approve the business combination. These interests include, among other things:

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor and independent directors hold an aggregate of 6,666,667 private placement warrants that would expire worthless if a business combination is not consummated, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $28,333,335, based on the closing price of our public warrants of $4.25 per warrant on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $18,333,335;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor may convert any working capital loans that it may make to us into up to an additional 1,000,000 private placement warrants, at the price of $1.50 per warrant;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed not to redeem any of the shares of our common stock held by them in connection with a stockholder vote to approve the business combination;

 

   

the fact that our initial stockholders paid an aggregate of $25,000 for the Founder Shares and that such securities will have a significantly higher value at the time of the business combination, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $106,837,500, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $106,812,500;

 

   

the fact that certain of DCRC’s officers and directors collectively own, directly or indirectly, a material interest in our Sponsor;

 

   

the fact that affiliates of our Sponsor own an aggregate of 1,660,417 shares of Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock, which at the Exchange Ratio, would be exchanged for 5,292,247 shares of our Class A Common Stock at the Closing;

 

   

the anticipated appointment of each of Erik Anderson, a member of the DCRC Board and DCRC’s Chief Executive Officer, and Robert Tichio, a member of the DCRC Board, as a director on the New Solid Power Board in connection with the closing of the business combination;

 

   

if the Trust Account is liquidated, including in the event we are unable to complete an Initial Business Combination within the required time period, our Sponsor has agreed to indemnify us to ensure that the proceeds in the Trust Account are not reduced below $10.00 per public share, or such lesser amount per public share as is in the Trust Account on the liquidation date, by the claims of (a) any third party (other than our independent public accountants) for services rendered or products sold to us or (b) a prospective target business with which we have entered into an acquisition agreement, but only if such a third party or target business has not executed a waiver of all rights to seek access to the Trust Account;

 

   

the fact that our independent directors own an aggregate of 360,000 Founder Shares, which if unrestricted and freely tradeable would be valued at approximately $4,395,600, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting;


 

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the fact that our Sponsor will benefit from the completion of a business combination and may be incentivized to complete an acquisition of a less favorable target company or on terms less favorable to stockholders rather than liquidate;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor and its affiliates can earn a positive rate of return on their investment, even if other DCRC stockholders experience a negative rate of return in the post-business combination company;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, such as identifying potential target businesses and performing due diligence on suitable business combinations; and

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will lose their entire investment in us if an Initial Business Combination is not completed.

At the Closing, we anticipate that our Sponsor will own 6,367,353 private placement warrants and 8,390,000 shares of New Solid Power common stock. In addition, on October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. The note does not bear interest and is repayable in full upon consummation of an Initial Business Combination. If we do not complete an Initial Business Combination, the note will not be repaid and all amounts owed under it will be forgiven. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert all or a portion of the unpaid principal balance of the note into that number of warrants to purchase one share of Class A Common Stock equal to the principal amount of the note so converted divided by $1.50. The terms of these warrants will be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. The note is subject to customary events of default, the occurrence of which automatically trigger the unpaid principal balance of the note and all other sums payable with regard to the note becoming immediately due and payable.

Further, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, there has been no reimbursement to our Sponsor, officers or directors for any out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, and no such amounts have been incurred as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus. However, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, an affiliate of our Sponsor has incurred approximately $4.1 million of expenses on DCRC’s behalf, of which approximately $3.0 million has been repaid by DCRC to the affiliate of our Sponsor. The balance will be repaid by DCRC at the Closing.

Investors in our Sponsor, each of which contributed capital to our Sponsor in exchange for Founder Shares and private placement warrants, include entities affiliated with certain of our non-independent directors and officers. Specifically, Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen, Robert Tichio and Peter Haskopoulos are each affiliated with Sponsor Manager, and Erik Anderson is affiliated with WRG, through which such DCRC directors and officers have an indirect economic interest in the private placement warrants and shares of New Solid Power common stock anticipated to be held by our Sponsor as of the completion of the business combination.

Our independent directors paid $1,028 in aggregate consideration for the 360,000 Founder Shares transferred to our independent directors by our Sponsor at the closing of our IPO. In addition, our independent directors purchased 299,314 private placement warrants at a price of $1.50 per warrant at the closing of our IPO.


 

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The table set forth below summarizes the interests of Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares along with (i) the total investment made in our Sponsor (or purchase price paid for the private placement warrants, in the case of our independent directors) by Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in exchange for their interests in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares and (ii) the value of such interests based on the closing price of the public warrants and Class A Common Stock as of October 29, 2021, all of which would be lost if an Initial Business Combination is not completed by us within the required time period:

 

Name of Holder

   DCRC
Position
   Total
Purchase
Price / Capital
Contributions
     Number
of Private
Placement
Warrants
    Value of
Private
Placement
Warrants as
of October 29,
2021
    Number
of
Founder
Shares
     Value of
Founder
Shares as of
October 29,
2021
 

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor Manager III, LLC1

   N/A    $ 7,923,040        5,268,801 3    $ 22,392,404 3      6,943,741      $ 84,783,078  

WRG DCRC Investors, LLC2

   N/A    $ 1,150,710        765,219     $ 3,252,181       1,008,759      $ 12,316,947  

James AC McDermott

   Director    $ 300,000        199,543     $ 848,058       240,000      $ 2,930,400  

Jennifer Aaker

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342       40,000      $ 488,400  

Jane Kearns

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342       40,000      $ 488,400  

Jeffrey Tepper

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342       40,000      $ 488,400  

 

1 

DCRC directors Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen and Robert Tichio and Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Secretary Peter Haskopoulos each have an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through Sponsor Manager.

2 

DCRC Chief Executive Officer Erik Anderson has an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through WRG.

3 

On October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert the unpaid principal balance of the note into up to 1,000,000 warrants. The terms of these warrants would be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. If these 1,000,000 warrants were issued and outstanding and unrestricted and freely tradable as of October 29, 2021, they would have been valued at $4,250,000 based on the closing price of the public warrants as of October 29, 2021.

In addition, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that we renounce our interest in any corporate opportunity offered to any director or officer unless such opportunity is expressly offered to such person solely in his or her capacity as a director or officer of our company and such opportunity is one we are legally and contractually permitted to undertake and would otherwise be reasonable for us to pursue. We do not believe, however, that this waiver of the corporate opportunities doctrine has materially affected our search for an acquisition target or will materially affect our ability to complete our business combination.

Reasons for the Approval of the Business Combination

After careful consideration, the DCRC Board recommends that our stockholders vote “FOR” the approval of the Business Combination Proposal.

For a more complete description of our reasons for the approval of the business combination and the recommendation of the DCRC Board, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—DCRC Board’s Reasons for the Approval of the Business Combination.”

Redemption Rights

Under our Charter, holders of our Class A Common Stock may elect to have their shares redeemed for cash at the applicable redemption price per share equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (a) the aggregate amount on deposit in the Trust Account as of two business days prior to the consummation of the business combination, including interest not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes, by (b) the total number of shares of Class A Common Stock issued in the IPO. As of June 30, 2021, this would have amounted to approximately $10.00 per share. Under our Charter, in connection with an Initial Business Combination, a public stockholder, together with any affiliate or any other person with whom such stockholder is acting in concert or as


 

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a “group” (as defined under Section 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act), is restricted from seeking redemption rights with respect to more than 20% of the public shares. Our Charter provides we will not redeem our Class A Common Stock in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our Initial Business Combination. However, our Charter will be amended and restated immediately prior to the business combination, such that such limitation will no longer apply, and we anticipate our Class A Common Stock will be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, which provides a separate exception from being subject to the “penny stock” rules.

If a holder exercises its redemption rights, then such holder will be exchanging its shares of Class A Common Stock for cash and will no longer own shares of Class A Common Stock and will not participate in our future growth, if any. Such a holder will be entitled to receive cash for its public shares only if it properly demands redemption and delivers its shares (either physically or electronically) to our transfer agent in accordance with the procedures described herein. See the section entitled “Special Meeting of DCRC Stockholders—Redemption Rights” for the procedures to be followed if you wish to redeem your shares for cash.

Ownership of New Solid Power After the Closing

Organizational Structure

The following diagram illustrates the pre-business combination organizational structure of DCRC:

 

LOGO


 

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The following diagram illustrates the pre-business combination organizational structure of Solid Power:

 

LOGO

 

1 

Represents percentage ownership on a fully diluted basis.

 

The following diagram illustrates the structure of New Solid Power immediately following the consummation of the business combination. The interests set forth below (a) assume (i) that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, (ii) that there are no other issuances of equity interests of DCRC or Solid Power and (iii) that there are no exercises of Solid Power Options or Solid Power Warrants and (b) do not take into account DCRC warrants that will remain outstanding following the business combination and may be exercised at a later date. As a result of the business combination, the economic and voting interests of our public stockholders will decrease. If these assumptions are not correct, then the percent of ownership set forth in the diagram below would change.

 

LOGO

 

We anticipate that, upon the Closing, the ownership of New Solid Power will be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 61.9% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the public stockholders will own 35,000,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 21.1% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 11.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 8,750,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 5.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.


 

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The number of shares and the interests set forth above (a) assume (i) that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, (ii) that there are no other issuances of equity interests of DCRC or Solid Power and (iii) that there are no exercises of Solid Power Options or Solid Power Warrants and (b) do not take into account DCRC warrants that will remain outstanding following the business combination and may be exercised at a later date. As a result of the business combination, the economic and voting interests of our public stockholders will decrease.

The ownership percentages with respect to New Solid Power set forth above do not take into account warrants to purchase Class A Common Stock that will remain outstanding immediately following the business combination, but do include the Founder Shares. If the facts are different than these assumptions, the percentage ownership retained by DCRC’s existing stockholders in New Solid Power following the business combination will be different. For example, if we assume that all outstanding 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants were exercisable and exercised following completion of the business combination and further assume that no public stockholders elect to have their public shares redeemed, then the ownership of New Solid Power would be as follows:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes holders of Solid Power Preferred Stock, each share of which will be converted to Solid Power Common Stock immediately before consummation of the business combination) will own 102,658,230 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 55.7% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the public stockholders will own 46,666,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 25.3% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock;

 

   

the New PIPE Investors will own 19,500,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 10.6% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock; and

 

   

the initial stockholders will own 15,416,667 shares of our Class A Common Stock, which will constitute 8.4% of our outstanding Class A Common Stock.

The public warrants and private placement warrants will become exercisable on the later of 30 days after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or 12 months from the closing of our Initial Public Offering and will expire five years after the completion of an Initial Business Combination or earlier upon their redemption or liquidation.

Please see the section entitled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” for further information.

Board of Directors of New Solid Power Following the Business Combination

Assuming the Director Election Proposal is approved at the special meeting, we expect the New Solid Power board of directors (the “New Solid Power Board”) to be comprised of Erik Anderson, Steven Goldberg, Robert Tichio, Rainer Feurer, Douglas Campbell, David Jansen and John Stephens.

Accounting Treatment

The business combination is intended to be accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in accordance with GAAP. Under this method of accounting, DCRC will be treated as the “acquired” company for financial


 

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reporting purposes. Accordingly, the business combination will be treated as the equivalent of Solid Power issuing stock for the net assets of DCRC, accompanied by a reverse recapitalization. The net assets of DCRC will be stated at historical cost, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded. Operations prior to the business combination will be those of Solid Power.

Appraisal Rights

Appraisal rights are not available to holders of shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock in connection with the business combination.

Other Proposals

In addition to the proposal to approve and adopt the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination, our stockholders will be asked to vote on proposals to amend and restate our Charter to, among other things, (a) increase the number of authorized shares of DCRC’s capital stock, par value $0.0001 per share, from 271,000,000 shares, consisting of (i) 270,000,000 shares of common stock, including 250,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and 20,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock, and (ii) 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, to 2,200,000,000 shares, consisting of (A) 2,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and (B) 200,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock; (b) eliminate certain provisions in the Charter relating to an Initial Business Combination that will no longer be applicable to us following the Closing; (c) change the post-combination company’s name to “Solid Power, Inc.”; (d) change the minimum stockholder vote required to amend, repeal or modify certain specified provisions of the Proposed Second A&R Charter or any provision inconsistent with any provision of New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws; (e) provide for the removal of a director only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority of the voting power of the stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon; (f) remove the right of holders of Class B Common Stock to act by written consent; and (g) remove the designation of certain courts as the exclusive forum for certain types of stockholder claims. A copy of our Proposed Second A&R Charter reflecting the proposed amendments pursuant to the Authorized Share Charter Proposal and the Additional Charter Proposal is attached to this proxy statement/prospectus as Annex B. For more information about the Authorized Share Charter Proposal and the Additional Charter Proposal, see the sections entitled “Proposal No. 2—The Authorized Share Charter Proposal” and “Proposal No. 3—The Additional Charter Proposal.”

In addition, our stockholders will be asked to vote on (a) a proposal to approve, for purposes of complying with applicable listing rules of the Nasdaq Capital Market, (i) the issuance to the Historical Rollover Stockholders (or reservation for issuance in respect of New Solid Power options, New Solid Power restricted stock and New Solid Power warrants issued in exchange for outstanding pre-merger Solid Power Options, Solid Power Restricted Stock and Solid Power Warrants) of 139,161,127 shares of Class A Common Stock and (ii) the issuance and sale of 19,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock in the PIPE Financing, (b) a proposal to approve and adopt the 2021 Plan, (c) a proposal to approve and adopt the ESPP, (d) a proposal to elect two directors to serve until the 2022 annual meeting of stockholders, two directors to serve until the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders and three directors to serve until the 2024 annual meeting of stockholders, and until their respective successors are duly elected and qualified, subject to such directors’ earlier death, resignation, retirement, disqualification or removal and (e) a proposal to approve the adjournment of the special meeting to a later date or dates, if necessary or appropriate, to permit further solicitation and vote of proxies in the event that there are insufficient votes for, or otherwise in connection with, the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Director Election Proposal.


 

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See the sections entitled “Proposal No. 4—The Nasdaq Proposal,” “Proposal No. 5—The 2021 Plan Proposal,” “Proposal No. 6—The ESPP Proposal,” “Proposal No. 7—The Director Election Proposal” and “Proposal No. 8—The Adjournment Proposal” for more information.

Date, Time and Place of Special Meeting

The special meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m., Eastern time, on December 7, 2021, via live webcast at the following address: https://www.cstproxy.com/decarbonizationplusacquisitioniii/2021, or such other date, time and place to which such meeting may be adjourned or postponed, to consider and vote upon the proposals.

Voting Power; Record Date

You will be entitled to vote or direct votes to be cast at the special meeting if you owned shares of Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock at the close of business on October 29, 2021, which is the record date for the special meeting. You are entitled to one vote for each share of Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock that you owned as of the close of business on the record date. If your shares are held in “street name” or are in a margin or similar account, you should contact your broker, bank or other nominee to ensure that votes related to the shares you beneficially own are properly counted. On the record date, there were 43,750,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock outstanding in the aggregate, of which 35,000,000 were public shares and 8,750,000 were Founder Shares held by the initial stockholders. On October 25, 2021, certain of the initial stockholders elected to convert an aggregate of 8,710,000 of the Founder Shares into shares of our Class A Common Stock. Accordingly, as of the record date for the special meeting, 8,710,000 of the Founder Shares were shares of our Class A Common Stock, and the remaining 40,000 Founder Shares were shares of our Class B Common Stock.

Proxy Solicitation

Proxies may be solicited by mail. We have engaged Morrow Sodali LLC to assist in the solicitation of proxies. If a stockholder grants a proxy, it may still vote its shares online if it revokes its proxy before the special meeting. A stockholder may also change its vote by submitting a later-dated proxy as described in the section entitled “Special Meeting of DCRC Stockholders—Revoking Your Proxy.”

Quorum and Required Vote for Proposals for the Special Meeting

A quorum of our stockholders is necessary to hold a valid meeting. A quorum will be present at the special meeting if holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereat attend virtually or are represented by proxy at the special meeting. Abstentions will count as present for the purposes of establishing a quorum.

The approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal and the Adjournment Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote and actually cast thereon online at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Authorized Share Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of (i) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class, and (ii) the holders of a majority of the shares of Class A Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Approval of the Additional Charter Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote thereon at the special meeting, voting as a single class. Accordingly, a stockholder’s failure to vote by proxy or to vote online at the special meeting will not be counted towards the


 

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number of shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock required to validly establish a quorum, and if a valid quorum is otherwise established, it will have no effect on the outcome of any vote on the Business Combination Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal or the Adjournment Proposal, but will have the same effect as a vote AGAINST the Charter Proposals.

Approval of the election of each director nominee pursuant to the Director Election Proposal requires the affirmative vote (online or by proxy) of a plurality of the votes cast by holders of our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock entitled to vote and actually cast thereon at the special meeting. This means that the seven director nominees will be elected if they receive more affirmative votes than any other nominee for the same position. Stockholders may not cumulate their votes with respect to the election of directors. Assuming a valid quorum is established, abstentions will have no effect on the Director Election Proposal.

The Closing is conditioned on the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, the Charter Proposals, the Nasdaq Proposal, the Director Election Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal and the ESPP Proposal at the special meeting. The Charter Proposals, the Director Election Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal and the ESPP Proposal are conditioned on the approval of the Business Combination Proposal and the Nasdaq Proposal. The Adjournment Proposal is not conditioned on the approval of any other proposal set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus.

Recommendation to DCRC Stockholders

The DCRC Board believes that each of the Business Combination Proposal, the Authorized Share Charter Proposal, the Additional Charter Proposal, the Nasdaq Proposal, the 2021 Plan Proposal, the ESPP Proposal, the Director Election Proposal and the Adjournment Proposal is in the best interests of DCRC and our stockholders and recommends that our stockholders vote “FOR” each Proposal (or in the case of the Director Election Proposal, “FOR ALL NOMINEES”) being submitted to a vote of the stockholders at the special meeting.

When you consider the recommendation of the DCRC Board in favor of approval of these Proposals, you should keep in mind that, aside from their interests as stockholders, our Sponsor and certain of our directors and officers have interests in the business combination that are different from, or in addition to, your interests as a stockholder. Please see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Interests of Certain Persons in the Business Combination.”

 

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Risk Factors

In evaluating the proposals set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus, you should carefully read this proxy statement/prospectus, including the annexes, and especially consider the factors discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors.” Some of the risks related to Solid Power’s business and industry and the business combination are summarized below.

Risks Related to Solid Power

Risks Related to Development and Commercialization

 

   

It will be challenging to develop all-solid-state battery cells capable of production at volume and with acceptable performance, yields and costs. The pace of development in materials science is often not predictable. Delays or failures in accomplishing particular development objectives may postpone or prevent Solid Power from generating revenues from the licensing of our battery cell technology or sales of its sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

 

   

If Solid Power’s all-solid-state battery cells fail to perform as expected, its ability to develop, market, and license its technology could be harmed.

 

   

Solid Power may not succeed in developing all-solid-state battery cells for commercialization under its JDAs within the time parameters specified therein. If Solid Power does not meet the milestones in certain JDAs, its partners may terminate them without liability to Solid Power. Termination of a JDA by a partner, particularly a key partner like Ford or BMW of North America LLC, could impair Solid Power’s reputation and prospects materially.

 

   

Solid Power depends on its ability to manage its relationships with existing partners, and to develop new relationships over time. Solid Power may not succeed in managing these business relationships, which could slow its development progress and impair its business prospects.

 

   

Solid Power has not reached any agreement with its partners on economic terms for the supply of its all-solid-state battery cell technology or sale of sulfide-based solid electrolytes. As a result, Solid Power’s projections of revenue and other financial results are uncertain.

 

   

The non-exclusive nature of Solid Power’s JDAs exposes it to the risk that its partners may elect to pursue other electric vehicle technologies, which likely would impair its revenue generating ability.

 

   

The terms of certain JDAs permit Solid Power’s partners to share in the intellectual property developed through the research and development efforts required under its particular agreements with them. Solid Power’s ability to share developments gained through the course of performance of a particular JDA with its other partners may be limited in certain circumstances. In certain circumstances, Solid Power’s partners may be able to exploit certain of the intellectual property developed under their respective JDAs in ways that are detrimental to it.

 

   

Solid Power has only conducted preliminary safety testing on its prototype all-solid-state battery cells. Solid Power’s all-solid-state battery cells will require additional and extensive safety testing prior to being installed in electric vehicles.

 

   

Substantial increases in the prices for Solid Power’s raw materials and components, some of which are obtained from a limited number of sources where demand may exceed supply, could materially and adversely affect its business.


 

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Risks Related to Industry and Market Trends

 

   

If solid-state battery cell technology does not become widely accepted, Solid Power may not be successful in generating revenues from the manufacturing and sale of its sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

 

   

The battery cell market continues to evolve and is highly competitive, and Solid Power may not be successful in competing in this market or establishing and maintaining confidence in its long-term business prospects among current and future partners and customers.

 

   

Solid Power’s future growth and success are dependent upon consumers’ willingness to adopt electric vehicles.

 

   

Solid Power may not be able to accurately estimate the future supply and demand for its all-solid-state battery cells and/or its sulfide-based solid electrolytes, which could result in a variety of inefficiencies in Solid Power’s business and hinder its ability to generate revenue. If Solid Power fails to accurately predict our manufacturing requirements, it could incur additional costs or experience delays.

Risks Related to Limited Operating History

 

   

Solid Power’s business model has yet to be tested and any failure to commercialize its strategic plans would have an adverse effect on its operating results and business, harm its reputation and could result in substantial liabilities that exceed its resources.

 

   

Solid Power is an early stage company with a history of financial losses and expects to incur significant expenses and continuing losses for the foreseeable future.

 

   

Solid Power may require additional capital to support business growth, and this capital might not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

 

   

Solid Power’s management does not have experience in operating a public company.

 

   

Solid Power may not succeed in establishing, maintaining and strengthening its brand, which would materially and adversely affect customer acceptance of its technologies and its business, revenues and prospects.

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

 

   

Solid Power relies heavily on owned and exclusively-licensed intellectual property, which includes patent rights, trade secrets, copyright, trademarks, and know-how. If Solid Power is unable to protect and maintain access to these intellectual property rights, its business and competitive position would be harmed.

 

   

Solid Power’s patent applications may not result in issued patents, which would result in the disclosures in those applications being available to the public. Also, Solid Power’s patent rights may be contested, circumvented, invalidated or limited in scope, any of which could have a material adverse effect on its ability to prevent others from interfering with commercialization of its products.

Risks Related to Finance and Accounting

 

   

Solid Power’s expectations and targets regarding the times when it will achieve various technical, pre-production and production-level performance objectives depend in large part upon assumptions, estimates, measurements, testing, analyses and data developed and performed by Solid Power, which if incorrect or flawed, could have a material adverse effect on its actual operating results and performance.

 

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Incorrect estimates or assumptions by management in connection with the preparation of Solid Power’s financial statements could adversely affect its reported assets, liabilities, income, revenue or expenses.

 

   

The unavailability, reduction or elimination of government and economic incentives could have a material adverse effect on Solid Power’s business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

 

   

Our auditors identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2020. If we are unable to develop and maintain an effective system of internal controls and procedures required by Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and materially and adversely affect our stock price, business and operating results.

Risks Related to Legal and Regulatory Compliance

 

   

Solid Power is subject to regulations regarding the storage and handling of various products. It may become subject to product liability claims, which could harm its financial condition and liquidity if it is not able to successfully defend or insure against such claims.

 

   

Solid Power is subject to substantial regulation, and unfavorable changes to, or failure by it to comply with, these regulations could substantially harm its business and operating results.

 

   

Solid Power is subject to various existing and future environmental health and safety laws, which may result in increased compliance costs or additional operating costs and restrictions. Failure to comply with such laws and regulations may result in substantial fines or other limitations that could adversely impact Solid Power’s financial results or operations.

Risks Related to DCRC and the Business Combination

 

   

DCRC’s Sponsor, certain members of the DCRC Board and DCRC’s officers have interests in the business combination that are different from or are in addition to other stockholders in recommending that stockholders vote in favor of approval of the Business Combination Proposal.

 

   

The DCRC Board did not obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in determining whether or not to proceed with the business combination.

 

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This proxy statement/prospectus contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. All statements, other than statements of present or historical fact included in this proxy statement/prospectus, regarding the proposed business combination, DCRC’s ability to consummate the business combination, the benefits of the transaction, the post-combination company’s future financial performance following the business combination and the post-combination company’s strategy, expansion plans, future operations, future operating results, estimated revenues, losses, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “continue,” “project” or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions about us that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Except as otherwise required by applicable law, DCRC disclaims any duty to update any forward-looking statements, all of which are expressly qualified by the statements in this section, to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this proxy statement/prospectus. DCRC cautions you that these forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, most of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond the control of DCRC.

In addition, DCRC cautions you that the forward-looking statements regarding DCRC and the post-combination company, which are contained in this proxy statement/prospectus, are subject to the following factors:

 

   

the occurrence of any event, change or other circumstances that could delay the business combination or give rise to the termination of the Business Combination Agreement and the other agreements related to the business combination (including catastrophic events, acts of terrorism, the outbreak of war, the novel coronavirus pandemic (“COVID-19”) and/or any other pandemic and other public health events), as well as management’s response to any of the foregoing;

 

   

the outcome of any legal proceedings that may be instituted against DCRC, Solid Power, their affiliates or their respective directors and officers following announcement of the business combination;

 

   

the inability to complete the business combination due to the failure to obtain approval of the stockholders of DCRC, regulatory approvals, or satisfy the other conditions to closing in the Business Combination Agreement;

 

   

the risk that DCRC may not be able to obtain the financing necessary to consummate the business combination;

 

   

the risk that the proposed business combination disrupts current plans and operations of Solid Power or DCRC as a result of the announcement and consummation of the business combination;

 

   

DCRC’s ability to realize the anticipated benefits of the business combination, which may be affected by, among other things, consumers’ willingness to adopt electric vehicles, competition and the ability of Solid Power to grow and manage growth profitably following the business combination;

 

   

risks relating to the uncertainty of the projected financial information with respect to Solid Power;

 

   

risks relating to Solid Power’s status as an early stage company with a history of financial losses, and an expectation to incur significant expenses and continuing losses for the foreseeable future;

 

   

risks relating to the uncertainty of the success of Solid Power’s research and development efforts;

 

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risks relating to the non-exclusive nature of Solid Power’s OEM and JDA relationships;

 

   

costs related to the business combination;

 

   

New Solid Power’s success in retaining or recruiting, or changes required in, its officers, key employees or directors following the business combination;

 

   

the possibility of third-party claims against DCRC’s Trust Account;

 

   

the amount of redemption requests by DCRC’s stockholders;

 

   

changes in applicable laws or regulations;

 

   

the ability of Solid Power to execute its business model, including market acceptance of all-solid-state battery cell technology;

 

   

the possibility that COVID-19 may hinder DCRC’s ability to consummate the business combination;

 

   

the possibility that COVID-19 may adversely affect the results of operations, financial position and cash flows of DCRC or the post-combination company; and

 

   

the possibility that DCRC or the post-combination company may be adversely affected by other economic, business or competitive factors.

Should one or more of the risks or uncertainties described in this proxy statement/prospectus, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results and plans could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Additional information concerning these and other factors that may impact the operations and projections discussed herein can be found in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in DCRC’s final prospectus for its Initial Public Offering, which was filed with the SEC on March 25, 2021, and in DCRC’s periodic filings with the SEC, including its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2021. DCRC’s SEC filings are available publicly on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

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RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Solid Power

The following risk factors will apply to our business and operations following the completion of the business combination. These risk factors are not exhaustive, and investors are encouraged to perform their own investigation with respect to the business, financial condition and prospects of Solid Power and our business, financial condition and prospects following the completion of the business combination. You should carefully consider the following risk factors in addition to the other information included in this proxy statement/prospectus, including matters addressed in the section entitled “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” We may face additional risks and uncertainties that are not presently known to us, or that we currently deem immaterial, which may also impair our business or financial condition. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the financial statements of Solid Power and notes to the financial statements included herein. Unless the context otherwise requires, all references in this section to “we,” “us” or “our” refer to Solid Power.

Risks Related to Development and Commercialization

It will be challenging to develop all-solid-state battery cells capable of production at volume and with acceptable performance, yields and costs. The pace of development in materials science is often not predictable. Delays or failures in accomplishing particular development objectives may postpone or prevent us from generating revenues from the licensing of our battery cell technology or sales of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

Our business depends on our ability to develop all-solid-state battery cells that outperform the lithium-ion batteries currently prevalent in electric vehicles. We expect to need at least four years of research and development and automotive qualification efforts before our cells will be advanced enough for us to realize material revenue generation from licensing agreements for our all-solid-state battery cells or reach commercial levels of manufacturing of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes. Developing the technology and know-how to produce all-solid-state battery cells at scale and cost, and which meet the performance requirements for wide adoption by automotive original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), is extremely challenging. We must overcome significant hurdles to complete development, validation and automotive qualification of our battery cells prior to being able to license or sell our technology to any customers. Some of the development hurdles that we need to overcome before licensing or selling our all-solid-state battery cell technology to customers include:

 

   

increasing the volume, yield, reliability and uniformity of our electrode layers, separators and cells;

 

   

increasing the size and layer count of our multi-layer cells;

 

   

developing manufacturing techniques to produce the volume of cells needed for customer applications;

 

   

understanding optimization requirements for high volume manufacturing equipment;

 

   

designing and engineering packaging to ensure adequate cycle life (i.e., the number of charge and discharge cycles that a battery cell can sustain until its capacity falls below 80% of the original capacity);

 

   

reducing cost of production; and

 

   

meeting the rigorous and challenging specifications required by our customers, and ultimately OEMs and cell manufacturers, including but not limited to, calendar life, energy density, abuse testing, charge rate, cycle life, and operating temperature.

 

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We expect to encounter engineering challenges as we increase the dimensions and throughput of components and cells. To achieve target energy density, we need to increase the layer-count and dimensions of our current electrodes, which are enclosed within a single battery package. We have built and tested both ten-layer cells and 22-layer cells. In order to be commercially viable, we expect our cells will need to have at least 40 layers, our cells will need to be capable of being produced at a high yield without compromising performance, and we will have to solve related packaging challenges in a way that is scalable and at an acceptable cost. If we are not able to overcome these engineering and mechanical hurdles, we may not succeed in licensing our all-solid-state battery cell technology or selling our sulfide-based solid electrolytes to customers as needed to continue our business.

Even if we complete development and succeed in entering into license agreements, we may not start to generate revenues from such agreements until our customers have retrofitted or constructed and deployed facilities to build our all-solid-state battery cells at scale. Any delay in the development, automotive qualification or third-party manufacturing scale-up of our all-solid-state battery cells would negatively impact our business as it will delay time to revenue. It may also negatively impact end-user relationships, including OEMs. Significant delays in providing licenses to our technology would materially damage our business, prospects, financial condition, operating results and brand.

If our all-solid-state battery cells fail to perform as expected, our ability to develop, market, and license our technology could be harmed.

Our battery cell architecture is inherently complex and incorporates technology and components that have not been used in commercial battery cell production. We anticipate that our research and development efforts will extend in an iterative process even beyond the time at which we initially deliver our all-solid-state battery cells to OEMs for validation. The continuous need to refine and optimize our products will require us to continue to perform extensive and costly research and development efforts even after the initial delivery of our cells to OEMs. For instance, we may learn from these validation efforts that our cells contain defects or errors that cause the cells not to perform as expected. Fixing any such problems may require design changes or other research and development efforts, take significant time, and be costly. There can be no assurance that we will be able to detect and fix any defects in our all-solid-state battery cell architecture. If our cell design fails to perform as expected, we could lose licensing contracts and customers of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

In addition, because we have a limited frame of reference from which to evaluate the long-term performance of our all-solid-state battery cell design, it is possible that issues or problems will arise once our technology has been deployed for a longer period. If our customers determine our technology does not perform as expected, they may delay deliveries, terminate further orders, or initiate product recalls, each of which could adversely affect our business, prospects, and results of operations.

We may not succeed in developing all-solid-state battery cells for commercialization under our JDAs within the time parameters specified therein. If we do not meet the milestones in certain JDAs, our partners may terminate them without liability to us. Termination of a JDA by a partner, particularly a key partner like Ford, BMW of North America LLC or SK Innovation, could impair our reputation and prospects materially.

We have entered into non-exclusive JDAs, including with certain of our early investors, Ford and BMW of North America LLC as well as SK Innovation, to collaborate on the research and development of our all-solid-state battery cell. The terms of some of these JDAs generally require us to continue our research and development of all-solid-state battery cells and component materials such that our products are capable of being deployed in electric vehicles within the next few years. There is no assurance that we will be able to complete research and development in the time frame required by the JDAs and if we are unable to, our partners may terminate their participation in the JDAs. Given the importance to us of these relationships, the termination of a JDA by a partner could impair our reputation and prospects materially.

 

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Our business depends on our ability to manage our relationships with existing partners, and to develop new relationships over time. We may not succeed in managing these business relationships, which could slow our development progress and impair our business prospects.

Our OEM partners may have economic, business, or legal interests or goals that are inconsistent with ours. As a result, it may be challenging for us to resolve issues that arise in respect of the performance of our JDAs, and in particular as any issue might impact development work underway under the JDAs. Any significant disagreements with them, and especially if we become dependent on that OEM partner for our research and development efforts, may impede our ability to maximize the benefits of our partnerships and slow the commercial roll-out of our all-solid-state battery cell designs. In addition, if our partners are unable or unwilling to meet their economic or other obligations under the JDAs, we may be required to fulfill those obligations alone, which could delay research and development progress and otherwise negatively impact our business and financial results. Furthermore, the relationships we have with our existing partners and the rights our partners’ rights have under their respective JDAs, may deter other automotive OEMs and cell manufacturers from working with us. If we are not able to expand our other customer relationships, our business and prospects could be materially harmed.

We have not reached any commercial agreement with our partners on economic terms for the supply of our all-solid-state battery cell technology or sale of sulfide-based solid electrolytes. As a result, our projections of revenue and other financial results are uncertain.

Our JDAs provide a framework for our cooperation, and certain of the JDAs contemplate that we will enter into additional arrangements with our partners for the purchase and pricing of sulfide-based solid electrolyte materials for integration into our all-solid-state battery cell design, as well as licensing our all-solid-state battery cell technology to cell producers. We have not reached agreement on key commercial terms with any of these partners and the structure for realizing the monetary value of our products is unknown. There can be no assurance that we will be able to agree with our partners on these key elements or that any terms will be financially beneficial for us.

The non-exclusive nature of our JDAs exposes us to the risk that our partners may elect to pursue other battery cell technologies, which likely would impair our revenue generating ability.

Our OEM partners are motivated to develop and commercialize improved battery cell technologies. To that end, our partners have invested, and are likely to continue to invest in the future, in their own development efforts and, in certain cases, in JDAs with our current and future competitors. If other technology is developed more rapidly than our all-solid-state battery cells, or if such competing technologies are determined to be more efficient or effective than our all-solid-state battery cells, our partners may elect to adopt and install a competitor’s battery cell technology or products over ours, which could materially impact our business, financial results, and prospects.

The terms of certain JDAs permit our partners to share in the intellectual property developed through the research and development efforts required under our particular agreements with them. Our ability to share developments gained through the course of performance of a particular JDA with our other partners may be limited in certain circumstances. In certain circumstances, our partners may be able to exploit certain of the intellectual property developed under their respective JDAs in ways that are detrimental to us.

Certain of our JDAs provide that, among other things, (i) any intellectual property jointly developed will be owned by both parties, with each party having the right to license that intellectual property to third parties in connection with the development of such party’s products, (ii) each party retains sole ownership of previously or independently developed intellectual property, and (iii) the partner receives a license to our solely developed intellectual property under the JDA for use in the partner’s products. Furthermore, to the extent a development we make jointly with one of our partners involves such partner’s previously developed intellectual property, we may not be able to use any information gleaned in the course of performance under the JDA with such partner in performance of our other partners’ JDAs, which could prevent us from scaling the development

 

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or deploying it in work with all of our partners. There are no assurances we will maintain the access we need to any intellectual property of our partners or that any jointly developed intellectual property will be adequately protected, or that our partners will not seek to capitalize on jointly developed intellectual property for their sole benefit, such as through licensing agreements or other contractual arrangements they may enter with third parties that do not benefit us. In certain of our JDAs to date, we have agreed that our partners would receive certain rights to our intellectual property in certain circumstances, including if we were to fail to perform under commercial agreements that we may enter into in the future or otherwise abandon our business following the execution of such commercial agreements. If those provisions are triggered, certain of our partners may receive perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free licenses to portions of our intellectual property, which may limit the profitability and competitive advantage offered by our intellectual property and adversely affect our revenue.

We have only conducted preliminary safety testing on our prototype all-solid-state battery cells. Our all-solid-state battery cells will require additional and extensive safety testing prior to being installed in electric vehicles.

To achieve acceptance by automotive OEMs, our anticipated commercial-sized all-solid-state battery cells will have to undergo extensive safety testing. We cannot assure you such tests will be successful, and we may identify different or new safety issues in our development or the commercial cells that have not been present in our prototype cells. If we have to make design changes to address any safety issues, we may have to delay or suspend commercialization, which could materially damage our business, prospects, financial condition, operating results and brand.

We are subject to risks relating to the construction and development of facilities for our short-term research and development and long-term production requirements.

Our business model contemplates that we will construct additional facilities for research and development and eventually sulfide-based solid electrolyte manufacturing. In the near-term, we need to construct a facility for higher-end research and development and scaling of our sulfide-based solid electrolyte material production. In the longer-term, and in connection with potential supply agreements, we will need to construct facilities to produce commercial volumes of our sulfide-based solid electrolyte. We have not secured a location or obtained the necessary licenses or permits for commercial-level sulfide-based solid electrolyte manufacturing facilities. In connection with constructing these facilities, we will need to identify and acquire the land or obtain leases for suitable locations appropriately zoned for activities involving hazardous materials, which will limit where we are able to locate our facilities and may require us to pay a premium for any such real estate. If we fail to do so, or otherwise encounter delays or lose necessary consents, permits, licenses, or commercial agreements, we could face delays or terminations of construction or development activities. If our planned facilities do not become operable on schedule, or at all, or become inoperable, production of our battery cells and our business will be harmed.

We are subject to risks relating to production scale manufacturing of our all-solid-state battery cells through partners in the longer term.

Our business plan contemplates top tier battery cell suppliers and automotive OEMs will manufacture our all-solid-state battery cells pursuant to licensing agreements with us. A component of our plan is to develop our products in such a way as to enable our manufacturing partners to utilize existing lithium-ion battery cell manufacturing processes and equipment. While we believe our development of a manufacturing process compatible with existing lithium-ion battery cell manufacturing lines provides significant competitive advantages, modifying or constructing these lines for production of our products could be more complicated or present significant challenges to our manufacturing partners that we do not currently anticipate. As with any large-scale capital project, any modification or construction of this nature could be subject to delays, cost overruns or other complications. Any failure to commence commercial production on schedule likely would lead to additional costs and could delay our ability to generate meaningful revenues. In addition, any such delay could

 

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diminish any “first mover” advantage we aim to attain, prevent us from gaining the confidence of OEMs and open the door to increased competition. All of the foregoing could hinder our ability to successfully launch and grow our business and achieve a competitive position in the market.

Collaboration with third parties to manufacture our all-solid-state battery cells reduces our level of control over the process. We could experience delays if our partners do not meet agreed upon timelines or experience capacity constraints. There is risk of potential disputes with partners, which could stop or slow battery cell production, and we could be affected by adverse publicity related to our partners, whether or not such publicity is related to such third parties’ collaboration with us. In addition, we cannot guarantee that our suppliers will not deviate from agreed-upon quality standards. Further, any partnerships with international third-party cell manufacturers or automotive OEMs could expose us to the political, legal and economic risks impacting the regions in which our partners’ manufacturing facilities are located, further reducing our control over the production process as we scale manufacturing.

We may be unable to enter into agreements with cell manufacturers on terms and conditions acceptable to us and therefore we may need to contract with other third parties or create our own commercial production capacity. We may not be able to engage other third parties or establish or expand our own production capacity to meet our needs on acceptable terms, or at all. The expense and time required to adequately complete any transition may be greater than anticipated. Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.

We rely on complex equipment for our operations, and production involves a significant degree of risk and uncertainty in terms of operational performance and costs.

We rely heavily on complex equipment for our operations and the production of our all-solid-state battery cells. The work required to integrate this equipment into the production of our all-solid-state battery cells is time intensive and requires us to work closely with the equipment providers to ensure that it works properly with our proprietary technology. This integration involves a degree of uncertainty and risk and may result in the delay in the scaling up of production or result in additional cost to our all-solid-state battery cells.

Our current manufacturing facilities require, and we expect our future manufacturing facilities will require, large-scale machinery. Such machinery may unexpectedly malfunction and require repairs and spare parts to resume operations, which may not be available when needed. We do not expect to maintain any redundancies in our research and development facilities, so unexpected malfunctions of our production equipment may significantly affect our operational efficiency. In addition, because this equipment has historically not been used to build all-solid-state battery cells, the operational performance and costs associated with this equipment is difficult to predict and may be influenced by factors outside of our control, such as, but not limited to, failures by suppliers to deliver necessary components of our products in a timely manner and at prices and volumes acceptable to us, environmental hazards and associated costs of remediation, difficulty or delays in obtaining governmental permits, damages or defects in systems, industrial accidents, fires, seismic activity and other natural disasters.

Problems with our manufacturing equipment could result in the personal injury to or death of workers, the loss of production equipment, damage to manufacturing facilities, monetary losses, delays and unanticipated fluctuations in production. In addition, in some cases operational problems may result in environmental damage, administrative fines, increased insurance costs and potential legal liabilities. Any of these operational problems, or a combination of them could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows, financial condition or prospects.

 

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We may obtain licenses on technology that has not been commercialized or has been commercialized only to a limited extent, and the success of our business may be adversely affected if such technology does not perform as expected.

From time to time, we may license from third parties, including our partners under the JDAs, technologies that have not been commercialized or which have been commercialized only to a limited extent. These technologies may not perform as expected within our all-solid-state battery cells and related products. If the cost, performance characteristics, manufacturing process or other specifications of these licensed technologies fall short of our targets, our projected sales, costs, time to market, competitive advantage, future product pricing and potential operating margins may be adversely affected.

Substantial increases in the prices for our raw materials and components, some of which are obtained from a limited number of sources where demand may exceed supply, could materially and adversely affect our business.

We rely on third-party suppliers for components and equipment necessary to develop our all-solid-state battery cells, including key supplies, such as Li2S, lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (“NMC”), silicon, lithium metal foil and manufacturing tools for our all-solid-state battery cells. We face risks relating to the availability of these materials and components, including that we will be subject to demand shortages and supply chain challenges and generally may not have sufficient purchasing power to eliminate the risk of price increases for the raw materials and tools we need. Further, certain components, including Li2S, are not currently produced at a scale we believe necessary to support our proposed commercial operations. To the extent that we are unable to enter into commercial agreements with our current suppliers or our replacement suppliers on favorable terms, or these suppliers experience difficulties meeting our requirements, the development and commercial progression of our all-solid-state battery cells and related technologies may be delayed.

Separately, we may be subject to various supply chain requirements regarding, among other things, conflict minerals and labor practices. We may be required to incur substantial costs to comply with these requirements, which may include locating new suppliers if certain issues are discovered. We may not be able to find any new suppliers for certain raw materials or components required for our operations, or such suppliers may be unwilling or unable to provide us with products.

Any disruption in the supply of components, equipment or materials could temporarily disrupt research and development activities or production of our all-solid-state battery cells or sulfide-based solid electrolytes until an alternative supplier is able to supply the required material. Changes in business conditions, unforeseen circumstances, governmental changes, and other factors beyond our control or which we do not presently anticipate, could also affect our suppliers’ ability to deliver components or equipment to us on a timely basis. Any of the foregoing could materially and adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and prospects.

Currency fluctuations, trade barriers, tariffs or shortages and other general economic or political conditions may limit our ability to obtain key components or equipment for our all-solid-state battery cells or significantly increase freight charges, raw material costs and other expenses associated with our business, which could further materially and adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and prospects.

We may be unable to adequately control the costs associated with our operations and the components necessary to build our all-solid-state battery cells, and, if we are unable to control these costs and achieve cost advantages in our production of our all-solid-state battery cells at scale, our business will be adversely affected.

We require significant capital to develop our all-solid-state battery cell technologies and expect to incur significant expenses, including those relating to research and development, raw material procurement, leases,

 

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sales and distribution as we build our brand and market our technologies, and general and administrative costs as we scale our operations. Our ability to become profitable in the future will not only depend on our ability to successfully develop and market our sulfide-based solid electrolytes and all-solid-state cells, but also to control our costs. If we are unable to efficiently design, appropriately price, sell and distribute our sulfide-based solid electrolytes and all-solid-state battery cell technologies, our anticipated margins, profitability and prospects would be materially and adversely affected.

If we are unable to attract and retain key employees and qualified personnel, our ability to compete could be harmed.

Our success depends on our ability to attract and retain our executive officers, key employees and other qualified personnel, and our operations may be severely disrupted if we lost their services. As we build our brand and become more well known, there is increased risk that competitors or other companies will seek to hire our personnel. Our success also depends on our continuing ability to identify, hire, attract, train and develop other highly qualified personnel. Competition for these employees can be intense, and our ability to hire, attract and retain them depends on our ability to provide competitive compensation. We may not be able to attract, assimilate, develop or retain qualified personnel in the future, and our failure to do so could seriously harm our business and prospects.

In addition, we are highly dependent on the services of Douglas Campbell, our Chief Executive Officer, and other senior technical and management personnel, including our executive officers, who would be difficult to replace. If Mr. Campbell or other key personnel were to depart, we may not be able to successfully attract and retain the personnel necessary to grow our business.

Our insurance coverage may not be adequate to protect us from all business risks.

We may be subject, in the ordinary course of business, to losses resulting from products liability, accidents, acts of God, and other claims against us, for which we may have no insurance coverage. As a general matter, the policies that we do have may include significant deductibles, and we cannot be certain that our insurance coverage will be sufficient to cover all future losses or claims against us. A loss that is uninsured or which exceeds policy limits may require us to pay substantial amounts, which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results. Furthermore, although we plan to obtain and maintain insurance for damage to our property and the disruption of our business, this insurance may be challenging to obtain and maintain on terms acceptable to us and may not be sufficient to cover all of our potential losses.

Our facilities or operations could be damaged or adversely affected as a result of natural disasters and other catastrophic events, including fire and explosions.

We currently conduct our operations in a single leased facility. Our current and future development and manufacturing facilities or operations could be adversely affected by events outside of our control, such as natural disasters, wars, health pandemics and epidemics such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and other calamities. We cannot assure you that any backup systems will be adequate to protect us from the effects of fire, explosions, floods, cyber-attacks (including ransomware attacks), typhoons, earthquakes, power loss, telecommunications failures, break-ins, war, riots, terrorist attacks or similar events. Any of the foregoing events may give rise to interruptions, breakdowns, system failures, technology platform failures or internet failures, which could cause the loss or corruption of data or malfunctions of software or hardware as well as adversely affect our ability to conduct our research and development activities as and on the timeline currently contemplated. These risks will remain particularly acute until we have completed the permitting and build-out of our second facility, which we expect will not occur until 2022 and may be further delayed.

 

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We have been, and may in the future be, adversely affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic and/or any other pandemic.

We face various risks related to epidemics, pandemics, and other outbreaks, including the recent COVID-19 pandemic and/or any other pandemic. The impact of COVID-19, including changes in consumer and business behavior, pandemic fears and market downturns, and restrictions on business and individual activities, has created significant volatility in the global economy and led to reduced economic activity. The spread of COVID-19 has also impacted our potential customers and our suppliers by disrupting the manufacturing, delivery and overall supply chain of battery cell, electric vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers and has led to a global decrease in battery cell and electric vehicle sales in markets around the world.

The pandemic has resulted in government authorities implementing numerous measures to try to contain the virus, such as travel bans and restrictions, quarantines, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders, and business shutdowns. These measures may adversely impact our employees, research and development activities and operations and the operations of our customers, suppliers, vendors and business partners. In addition, various aspects of our business cannot be conducted remotely, including many aspects of the research and development and manufacturing of our all-solid-state material and our all-solid-state battery cells. These measures, to the extent imposed by government authorities, may remain in place for a significant period of time and they may adversely affect our future research and development, manufacturing and building plans, business and results of operations. We may take further actions as may be required by government authorities or that we determine are in the best interests of our customers, employees, suppliers, vendors and business partners.

The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts our business, prospects and results of operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including, but not limited to, the duration and spread of the pandemic, its severity, the actions to contain the virus or treat its impact, and how quickly and to what extent normal economic and operating activities can resume. Even as the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, we may continue to experience an adverse impact to our business as a result of the global economic impact, including any recession that has occurred or may occur in the future.

There are no comparable recent events that may provide guidance as to the effect of the spread of COVID-19 and a pandemic, and, as a result, the ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic or a similar health epidemic is highly uncertain.

Risks Related to Industry and Market Trends

If solid-state battery cell technology does not become widely accepted, we may not be successful in generating revenues from the manufacturing and sale of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

Our business plan contemplates that we will develop the necessary production capabilities to manufacture our sulfide-based solid electrolytes for sale to top tier battery suppliers and automotive OEMs that have determined to manufacture solid-state battery cells, whether or not the ones we are working to develop. If a market for solid-state battery cells does not develop in the time or to the level we anticipate, we might not be able to generate revenues from this product line, which may prevent us from achieving our financial projections or recouping the costs we expect to incur in scaling our production of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes.

The battery cell market continues to evolve and is highly competitive, and we may not be successful in competing in this market or establishing and maintaining confidence in our long-term business prospects among current and future partners and customers.

The battery cell market in which we compete continues to evolve and is highly competitive. To date, we have focused our efforts on our all-solid-state battery cell technology, a promising alternative to conventional lithium-ion battery cell technology. However, lithium-ion battery cell technology has been widely adopted and

 

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our current competitors have, and future competitors may have, greater resources than we do and may also be able to devote greater resources to the development of their current and future technologies. These competitors also may have greater access to customers and may be able to establish cooperative or strategic relationships amongst themselves or with third parties that may further enhance their resources and competitive positioning. In addition, traditional lithium-ion battery cell manufacturers may continue to reduce cost and expand supply of conventional batteries and, therefore, reduce the prospects for our business or negatively impact the ability for us to sell our products at a market-competitive price and yet at sufficient margins.

Many automotive OEMs are researching and investing in solid-state battery cell efforts and, in some cases, in battery cell development and production. We do not have exclusive relationships with any OEM to provide their future battery cell technologies, and it is possible that the investments made by these OEMs might result in technological advances earlier than, or superior in certain respect to, the all-solid-state battery cells we are developing. There are a number of companies seeking to develop alternative approaches to solid-state battery cell technology. We expect competition in battery cell technology and electric vehicles to intensify due to increased demand for these vehicles and a regulatory push for electric vehicles, continuing globalization, and consolidation in the worldwide automotive industry. As new companies and larger, existing vehicle and battery cell manufacturers enter the solid-state battery cell space, we may lose any perceived or actual technological advantage we may have in the marketplace and suffer a decline in our position in the market.

Furthermore, the battery cell industry also competes with other emerging or evolving technologies, such as natural gas, advanced diesel and hydrogen-based fuel cell powered vehicles. Developments in alternative technologies or improvements in batteries technology made by competitors may materially adversely affect the sales, pricing and gross margins of our products. As technologies change, we will attempt to upgrade or adapt our products to continue to provide products with the latest technology. However, our products may become obsolete or our research and development efforts may not be sufficient to adapt to changes in or to create the necessary technology to effectively compete. If we are unable to keep up with competitive developments, including if such technologies achieve lower prices or enjoy greater policy support than the lithium-ion battery cell industry, our competitive position and growth prospects may be harmed. Similarly, if we fail to accurately predict and ensure that our all-solid-state battery cell technology can address customers’ changing needs or emerging technological trends, or if our customers fail to achieve the benefits expected from our all-solid-state battery cells, our business will be harmed.

We must continue to commit significant resources to develop our all-solid-state battery cell technology in order to establish a competitive position, and these commitments must be made without knowing whether our investments will result in products potential customers will accept. There is no assurance we will successfully identify new customer requirements, develop and bring our all-solid-state battery cells to market on a timely basis, or that products and technologies developed by others will not render our all-solid-state battery cells obsolete or noncompetitive, any of which would adversely affect our business and operating results.

We expect that automotive OEMs and top tier battery cell suppliers will be less likely to license our all-solid-state battery cells and/or incorporate our sulfide-based solid electrolytes if they are not convinced that our business will succeed in the long term. Similarly, suppliers and other third parties will be less likely to invest time and resources in developing business relationships with us if they are not convinced that our business will succeed in the long term. Accordingly, in order to build and maintain our business, we must instill and maintain confidence among current and future partners, customers, suppliers, analysts, ratings agencies and other parties in our long-term financial viability and business prospects. Maintaining such confidence may be particularly complicated by certain factors including those that are largely outside of our control, such as:

 

   

our limited operating history;

 

   

market unfamiliarity with our products;

 

   

delays in or impediments to completing or achieving our research and development goals;

 

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unexpected costs that automotive OEM and top tier cell partners may be required to incur to scale manufacturing, delivery and service operations to meet demand for electric vehicles containing our technologies or products;

 

   

competition and uncertainty regarding the future of electric vehicles;

 

   

the development and adoption of competing technologies that are less expensive and/or more effective than our products; and

 

   

our eventual production and sales performance compared with market expectations.

Our future growth and success are dependent upon consumers’ willingness to adopt electric vehicles.

Our growth and future demand for our products is highly dependent upon the adoption by consumers of alternative fuel vehicles in general and electric vehicles in particular. The market for new energy vehicles is still rapidly evolving, characterized by rapidly changing technologies, competitive pricing and factors, evolving government regulation and industry standards, and changing consumer demands and behaviors. If the market for electric vehicles in general does not develop as expected, or develops more slowly than expected, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be harmed.

We may not succeed in attracting customers during the development stage or for high volume commercial production, and our future growth and success depend on our ability to attract customers.

We may not succeed in attracting customers during our development stage or for high volume commercial production. Customers may be wary of unproven products or not be inclined to work with less established businesses. In addition, if we are unable to attract new customers in need of high-volume commercial production of our products, our business will be harmed.

Automotive OEMs are often large enterprises. Therefore, our future success will depend on our or our partners’ ability to effectively sell our products to such large customers. Sales to these end-customers involve risks that may not be present (or that are present to a lesser extent) with sales to smaller customers. These risks include, but are not limited to, (i) increased purchasing power and leverage held by large customers in negotiating contractual arrangements with us and (ii) longer sales cycles and the associated risk that substantial time and resources may be spent on a potential end-customer that elects not to purchase our products.

Automotive OEMs that are large organizations often undertake a significant evaluation process that results in a lengthy sales cycle. In addition, product purchases by large organizations are frequently subject to budget constraints, multiple approvals and unanticipated administrative, processing and other delays. Finally, large organizations typically have longer implementation cycles, require greater product functionality and scalability, require a broader range of services, demand that vendors take on a larger share of risks, require acceptance provisions that can lead to a delay in revenue recognition and expect greater payment flexibility. All of these factors can add further risk to business conducted with these potential customers.

We may not be able to accurately estimate the future supply and demand for our all-solid-state battery cells and/or our sulfide-based solid electrolytes, which could result in a variety of inefficiencies in our business and hinder our ability to generate revenue. If we fail to accurately predict our manufacturing requirements, we could incur additional costs or experience delays.

It is difficult to predict our future revenues and appropriately budget for our expenses, and we may have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. We anticipate being required to provide forecasts of our demand to our current and future suppliers prior to the scheduled delivery of products to potential customers. Currently, there is no historical basis for making judgments on the demand for our all-solid-state battery cells and/or our sulfide-based solid electrolytes or our ability to develop, manufacture, and deliver

 

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such products, or our profitability in the future. If we overestimate our requirements, our suppliers may have excess inventory, which indirectly would increase our costs. If we underestimate our requirements, our suppliers may have inadequate inventory, which could interrupt manufacturing of our products and result in delays in shipments and revenues. In addition, lead times for materials and components that our suppliers order may vary significantly and depend on factors such as the specific supplier, contract terms and demand for each component at a given time. If we fail to order sufficient quantities of product components in a timely manner, the delivery of our all-solid-state battery cells and/or our sulfide-based solid electrolytes to our potential customers could be delayed, which would harm our business, financial condition and operating results.

Risks Related to Limited Operating History

Our business model has yet to be tested and any failure to commercialize our strategic plans would have an adverse effect on our operating results and business, harm our reputation and could result in substantial liabilities that exceed our resources.

Investors should be aware of the difficulties normally encountered by a new enterprise, many of which are beyond our control, including substantial risks and expenses in the course of establishing or entering new markets, organizing operations and undertaking marketing activities. The likelihood of our success must be considered in light of these risks, expenses, complications, delays and the competitive environment in which we operate. There is, therefore, nothing at this time upon which to base an assumption that our business plan will prove successful, and we may not be able to generate significant revenue, raise additional capital or operate profitably. We will continue to encounter risks and difficulties frequently experienced by early commercial stage companies, including scaling up our infrastructure and headcount, and may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties or delays in connection with our growth. In addition, as a result of the capital requirements of our business, we can be expected to continue to sustain substantial operating expenses without generating sufficient revenue to cover expenditures. Any investment in our company is therefore highly speculative and could result in the loss of your entire investment.

It is difficult to predict our future revenues and appropriately budget for our expenses, and we have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. In the event that actual results differ from our estimates or we adjust our estimates in future periods, our operating results, prospects and financial position could be materially affected. The projected financial information appearing elsewhere in these materials was prepared by management and reflects current estimates of future performance. The projected results depend on the successful implementation of management’s growth strategies and are based on assumptions and events over which we have only partial or no control. In particular, our projected results are heavily reliant on our ability to license our all-solid-state battery cells and sell our sulfide-based solid electrolytes. The assumptions underlying such projected information require the exercise of judgment and may not occur, and the projections are subject to uncertainty due to the effects of economic, business, competitive, regulatory, legislative, and political or other changes.

We are an early stage company with a history of financial losses and expect to incur significant expenses and continuing losses for the foreseeable future.

We incurred a net loss of approximately $14.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 and an accumulated deficit of approximately $105.3 million from our inception in 2012 through December 31, 2020. We believe that we will continue to incur operating and net losses each quarter until the time significant production of our all-solid-state battery cells or sales of our sulfide-based solid electrolytes begins, which is not expected to occur until at least 2026, and may occur later.

We expect the rate at which we will incur losses to be significantly higher in future periods as we, among other things, continue to incur significant expenses in connection with the design, development and manufacturing of our materials and all-solid-state battery cells; expand our research and development activities; invest in additional research and development and manufacturing facilities and capabilities; build up inventories

 

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of raw materials and other components; commence sales and marketing activities; develop our distribution infrastructure; and increase our general and administrative functions to support our growing operations. We may find that these efforts are more expensive than we currently anticipate or that these efforts may not result in revenues, which would further increase our losses.

We may require additional capital to support business growth, and this capital might not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

We may need additional capital before we commence generating revenues, and it may not be available on acceptable terms, if at all. For example, our capital budget assumes, among other things, that (i) DCRC will satisfy its condition precedent under the Business Combination Agreement to have unrestricted cash on hand at the closing of the business combination of at least $300 million (without giving effect to transaction expenses) after consummation of the PIPE Financing and after distribution of the funds in the Trust Account (the “Minimum Cash Condition”), which is a condition that we may choose to waive if not satisfied, and (ii) our development timeline progresses as planned and our corresponding expenditures are consistent with current expectations, both of which are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including those described herein.

More specifically, we expect our capital expenditures and working capital requirements to increase materially in the near future, as we accelerate our research and development efforts and scale up production operations with our partners. As we approach commercialization, we expect our operating expenses will increase substantially on account of increased headcount and other general and administrative expenses necessary to support a rapidly growing company.

As a result, we may need to access the debt and equity capital markets to obtain additional financing in the future. However, these sources of financing may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all. Our ability to obtain additional financing will be subject to a number of factors, including:

 

   

market conditions;

 

   

the level of success we have experienced with our research and development programs;

 

   

our operating performance;

 

   

investor sentiment; and

 

   

our ability to incur additional debt in compliance with any agreements governing our then-outstanding debt.

These factors may make the timing, amount, terms or conditions of additional financings unattractive to us. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity, equity-linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, references or privileges senior to the rights of our currently issued and outstanding equity or debt, and our existing stockholders may experience dilution. If we are unable to generate sufficient funds from operations or raise additional capital, we may be forced to take actions to reduce our capital or operating expenditures, including by not seeking potential acquisition opportunities, eliminating redundancies, or reducing or delaying our production facility expansions, which may adversely affect our business, operating results, financial condition and prospects.

If we fail to effectively manage our future growth, we may not be able to market and license the technology and know-how to manufacture our all-solid-state battery cells or sell our sulfide-based solid electrolyte successfully.

We intend to use the net proceeds from our recent Series B Financing, amounts in DCRC’s escrow account after giving effect to redemptions and the net proceeds from the PIPE Financing to expand our operations significantly, with a view toward accelerating our research and development activities and positioning our company for potential commercialization of our technologies. In connection with these efforts, we anticipate hiring, retaining and training personnel, establishing manufacturing plants and other facilities, and implementing

 

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administrative infrastructure, systems and processes. That said, our management team will have considerable discretion in the application of the funds available to us following completion of the business combination. We may use these funds for purposes that do not yield a significant return or any return at all for our stockholders. In addition, pending their use, we may invest the cash held at closing of the business combination in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value. If we cannot manage our growth effectively, including by controlling our expenditures for these initiatives to the greatest extent possible, our business could be harmed.

Most of our management does not have experience in operating a public company.

Most of our executive officers do not have experience in the management of a publicly traded company. Our management team may not successfully or effectively manage our transition to a public company that will be subject to significant regulatory oversight and reporting obligations under federal securities laws. We may not have adequate personnel with the appropriate level of knowledge, experience, and training in the policies, practices or internal controls over financial reporting required of public companies in the United States. As a result, we may be required to pay higher outside legal, accounting or consulting costs than our competitors, and our management team members may have to devote a higher proportion of their time to issues relating to compliance with the laws applicable to public companies, both of which might put us at a disadvantage relative to competitors.

We may not succeed in establishing, maintaining and strengthening our brand, which would materially and adversely affect customer acceptance of our technologies and our business, revenues and prospects.

Our business and prospects depend on our ability to develop, maintain and strengthen our brand. If we are not able to establish, maintain and strengthen our brand, we may lose the opportunity to build a critical mass of customers. The automobile industry is intensely competitive, and we may not be successful in building, maintaining and strengthening our brand. Our current and potential competitors, including many battery cell manufacturers and automotive OEMs around the world, have greater name recognition, broader customer relationships and substantially greater marketing resources than we do. If we do not develop and maintain a strong brand, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results will be materially and adversely impacted.

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

We rely heavily on owned and exclusively-licensed intellectual property, which includes patent rights, trade secrets, copyright, trademarks, and know-how. If we are unable to protect and maintain access to these intellectual property rights, our business and competitive position would be harmed.

We may not be able to prevent unauthorized use of our owned and exclusively-licensed intellectual property, which could harm our business and competitive position. We rely on a combination of the intellectual property protections afforded by patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws in the United States and other jurisdictions, as well as license agreements and other contractual protections, to establish, maintain and enforce rights and competitive advantage in our proprietary technologies. In addition, we seek to protect our intellectual property rights through nondisclosure and invention assignment agreements with our employees and consultants, and through non-disclosure agreements with business partners and other third parties. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, third parties, including our business partners, may attempt to copy or otherwise obtain and use our intellectual property without our consent or may decline to license or defend necessary intellectual property rights to us on terms favorable to our business. Monitoring unauthorized use of our intellectual property is difficult and costly, and the steps we have taken or will take to prevent misappropriation may not be sufficient. Any enforcement efforts we undertake, including litigation, could require involvement of the licensor, be time-consuming and expensive, and could divert management’s attention, all of which could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, existing intellectual property laws and contractual remedies may afford less protection than needed to safeguard our proprietary technologies. A significant portion of our patent rights have been obtained through exclusive licenses. Because we do not own those patent rights, we have less control over their maintenance and enforcement, which could harm our ability to maintain any competitive advantage those patent rights provide.

 

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Patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws vary significantly throughout the world. A number of foreign countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the United States. Therefore, our intellectual property rights may not be as strong or as easily enforced outside of the United States and efforts to protect against the unauthorized use of our intellectual property rights, technology and other proprietary rights may be impossible outside of the United States. Failure to adequately protect our owned and exclusively-licensed intellectual property rights could result in our competitors using our intellectual property to offer products, potentially resulting in the loss of some of our competitive advantage, a decrease in our revenue and reputational harm caused by inferior products offered by third parties, which would adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our patent applications may not result in issued patents, which would result in the disclosures in those applications being available to the public. Also, our patent rights may be contested, circumvented, invalidated or limited in scope, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to prevent others from interfering with commercialization of our products.

Our patent portfolio includes some patent applications. Our patent applications may not result in issued patents, which may have a material adverse effect on our ability to prevent others from commercially exploiting products similar to our products to our disadvantage. The status of patents involves complex legal and factual questions and the breadth of claims allowed is uncertain. As a result, we cannot be certain that the patent applications that we file will result in patents being issued, or that our patents and any patents that may be issued to us will afford protection against competitors with similar technology. Numerous patents and pending patent applications owned by others exist in the fields in which we have developed and are developing our technology, any number of which could be considered prior art and prevent us from obtaining a patent. In addition to those who may claim priority, any of our future or existing patents or pending patent applications (including those we have rights to under exclusive license) may also be challenged by others on the basis that they are otherwise invalid or unenforceable. Furthermore, patent applications filed in foreign countries may be subject to laws, rules and procedures that differ from those of the United States, and thus we cannot be certain that foreign patent applications related to issued U.S. patents will be issued.

We have not performed exhaustive searches or analyses of the intellectual property landscape of the battery industry; therefore, we are unable to guarantee that our technology, or its ultimate integration into electric vehicle battery packs, does not infringe intellectual property rights of third parties. We may need to defend ourselves against intellectual property infringement claims, which may be time-consuming and could cause us to incur substantial costs.

Companies, organizations or individuals, including our current and future competitors, may hold or obtain patents, trademarks or other proprietary rights that would prevent, limit or interfere with our ability to make, use, develop, sell, license, lease or market our products or technologies, which could make it more difficult for us to operate our business. From time to time, we may receive inquiries from third parties relating to whether we are infringing their intellectual property rights and/or seek court declarations that they do not infringe upon our intellectual property rights. Companies holding patents or other intellectual property rights relating to batteries may bring suits alleging infringement of such rights or otherwise asserting their rights and seeking licenses. In addition, if we are determined to have infringed upon a third party’s intellectual property rights, we may be required to do one or more of the following:

 

   

cease selling, leasing, incorporating or using products that incorporate the challenged intellectual property;

 

   

pay substantial damages;

 

   

materially alter our research and development activities and proposed production processes;

 

   

obtain a license from the holder of the infringed intellectual property right, which may not be available on reasonable terms or at all; or

 

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redesign our battery cells at significant expense.

In the event of a successful claim of infringement against us and our failure or inability to obtain a license to continue to use the technology on reasonable terms, our business, prospects, operating results and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. In addition, any litigation or claims, whether or not well-founded, could result in substantial costs, negative publicity, reputational harm and diversion of resources and management’s attention.

We also license patents and other intellectual property from third parties, and we may face claims that our use of this intellectual property infringes the rights of others. In such cases, we may seek indemnification from our licensors under our license contracts with them as permitted by our license agreements. However, our rights to indemnification may be unavailable or insufficient to cover our costs and losses, depending on our use of the technology, whether we choose to retain control over conduct of the litigation, and other factors.

Risks Related to Finance and Accounting

Our expectations and targets regarding the times when we will achieve various technical, pre-production and production-level performance objectives depend in large part upon assumptions, estimates, measurements, testing, analyses and data developed and performed by us, which if incorrect or flawed, could have a material adverse effect on our actual operating results and performance.

Our expectations and targets regarding the times when we will achieve various technical, pre-production and production objectives reflect our current expectations and estimates. Whether we will achieve these objectives when we expect depends on a number of factors, many of which are outside our control, including, but not limited to:

 

   

success and timing of our development activity and ability to develop an all-solid-state battery cell that achieves our desired performance metrics and achieves the requisite automotive industry validations before our competitors;

 

   

unanticipated technical or manufacturing challenges or delays;

 

   

difficulties identifying or constructing the necessary research and development and manufacturing facilities;

 

   

technological developments relating to lithium-ion, lithium-metal all-solid-state or other batteries that could adversely affect the commercial potential of our technologies;

 

   

the extent of consumer acceptance of electric vehicles generally, and those deploying our products, in particular;

 

   

competition, including from established and future competitors in the battery cell industry or from competing technologies such as hydrogen fuel cells that may be used to power electric vehicles;

 

   

whether we can obtain sufficient capital when required to build our manufacturing facilities and sustain and grow our business;

 

   

adverse developments in our partnership relationships, including termination of our partnerships or changes in our partners’ timetables and business plans, which could hinder our development efforts;

 

   

our ability to manage our growth;

 

   

whether we can manage relationships with key suppliers and the availability of the raw materials we need to procure from them;

 

   

our ability to retain existing key management, integrate recent hires and attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel; and

 

   

the overall strength and stability of domestic and international economies.

 

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Unfavorable changes in any of these or other factors, most of which are beyond our control, could materially and adversely affect our ability to achieve our objectives when planned and our business, results of operations and financial results.

Incorrect estimates or assumptions by management in connection with the preparation of our financial statements could adversely affect our reported assets, liabilities, income, revenue or expenses.

The preparation of our consolidated financial statements requires management to make critical accounting estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income, revenue or expenses during the reporting periods. Incorrect estimates and assumptions by management could adversely affect our reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income, revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. If we make incorrect assumptions or estimates, our reported financial results may be over or understated, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our auditors identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2020. If we are unable to develop and maintain an effective system of internal controls and procedures required by Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and materially and adversely affect our stock price, business and operating results.

As part of the independent audit of our 2019 and 2020 financial statements, we undertook a technical evaluation of our accounting of several financial instruments, including the convertible notes and equity grants we issued in 2019 and 2020. Our evaluation did not consider the applicable accounting guidance. As a result, our auditor issued a finding of a material weakness in internal controls over financial reporting related to the review of complex transactions for proper accounting treatment as our control environment would have failed to detect the misstatement prior to the financial statement issuance. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal controls over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. Management continues to evaluate steps to remediate the material weakness. These remediation measures may be time consuming and costly and there is no assurance that these initiatives will ultimately have the intended effects. In the future, management may not be able to effectively and timely implement controls and procedures that adequately respond to the increased regulatory compliance and reporting requirements.

In addition, we will be required to provide management’s attestation on internal controls. The standards required for a public company under Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) are significantly more stringent than those that were required of us as a privately held company. If we are not able to implement the additional requirements of Section 404(a) in a timely manner or with adequate compliance, we may not be able to assess whether our internal controls over financial reporting are effective, which may subject us to adverse regulatory consequences and could harm investor confidence and the market price of our securities.

If we identify any new material weaknesses in the future, any such newly identified material weakness could limit our ability to prevent or detect a misstatement of our accounts or disclosures that could result in a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements. In such case, if we are unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports or applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting and our stock price may decline as a result and we could become subject to litigation or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources. We cannot assure you that the measures we have taken to date, or any measures we may take in the future, will be sufficient to avoid potential future material weaknesses.

 

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We will incur significant increased expenses and administrative burdens as a public company, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We will face increased legal, accounting, administrative and other costs and expenses as a public company that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, including the requirements of Section 404, as well as rules and regulations subsequently implemented by the SEC, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 and the rules and regulations promulgated and to be promulgated thereunder, the PCAOB and the securities exchanges, impose additional reporting and other obligations on public companies. The development and implementation of the standards and controls necessary for us to achieve the level of accounting standards required of a public company in the United States may require costs greater than expected. It is possible that we will be required to expand our employee base and hire additional employees to support our operations as a public company, which will increase our operating costs in future periods.

Compliance with public company requirements will increase costs and make certain activities more time-consuming. A number of those requirements will require us to carry out activities we have not done previously. For example, we have created, or will create, new Board committees and adopted, or will adopt, new internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures. In addition, we will incur expenses associated with SEC reporting requirements. Furthermore, if any issues in complying with those requirements are identified (for example, if the auditors identify a material weakness or significant deficiency in the internal control over financial reporting), we could incur additional costs rectifying those issues, and the existence of those issues could adversely affect our reputation or investor perceptions of it. It will also be more expensive to obtain director and officer liability insurance. The additional reporting and other obligations imposed by these rules and regulations will increase legal and financial compliance costs and the costs of related legal, accounting and administrative activities. These increased costs will require us to spend money that could otherwise be used on our research and development programs and to achieve strategic objectives. Advocacy efforts by stockholders and third parties may also prompt additional changes in governance and reporting requirements, which could further increase costs.

Our ability to utilize our net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be subject to certain limitations.

In general, under Section 382 of the Code, a corporation that undergoes an “ownership change” is subject to limitations on its ability to use its pre-change NOLs to offset future taxable income. The limitations apply if a corporation undergoes an “ownership change,” which is generally defined as a greater than 50 percentage point change (by value) in its equity ownership by certain stockholders over a three-year period. If we have experienced an ownership change at any time since our incorporation, we may be subject to limitations on our ability to utilize our existing NOLs and other tax attributes to offset taxable income or tax liability. In addition, the business combination and future changes in our stock ownership, which may be outside of our control, may trigger an ownership change. Similar provisions of state tax law may also apply to limit our use of accumulated state tax attributes. As a result, even if we earn net taxable income in the future, our ability to use our pre-change NOLs and other tax attributes to offset such taxable income or tax liability may be subject to limitations, which could potentially result in increased future income tax liability to us.

There is also a risk that changes in law or regulatory changes may result in suspensions on the use of NOLs or tax credits, possibly with retroactive effect, and our existing NOLs or tax credits expiring or otherwise being unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities.

The unavailability, reduction or elimination of government and economic incentives could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

We currently, and expect to continue to, benefit from certain government subsidies and economic incentives including tax credits, rebates and other incentives that support the development and adoption of clean energy technology. We cannot assure you that these subsidies and incentive programs will be available to us at

 

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the same or comparable levels in the future. Any reduction, elimination or discriminatory application of government subsidies and economic incentives because of policy changes, or the reduced need for such subsidies and incentives due to the perceived success of clean and renewable energy products or other reasons, may require us to seek additional financing, which may not be obtainable on commercially attractive terms or at all, and may result in the diminished competitiveness of the battery cell industry generally or our all-solid-state battery cells in particular. Any change in the level of subsidies and incentives from which we benefit could materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Risks Related to Legal and Regulatory Compliance

We are subject to regulations regarding the storage and handling of various products. We may become subject to product liability claims, which could harm our financial condition and liquidity if we are not able to successfully defend or insure against such claims.

We may become subject to product liability claims which could harm our business, prospects, operating results, and financial condition. We face inherent risk of exposure to claims in the event our all-solid-state battery cells do not perform as expected or malfunction resulting in personal injury or death. Our risks in this area are particularly pronounced given our all-solid-state battery cells and sulfide-based solid electrolytes are still in the development stage and have not yet been commercially tested or mass produced. A successful product liability claim against us could require us to pay a substantial monetary award. Moreover, a product liability claim could generate substantial negative publicity about our technology and business and inhibit or prevent commercialization of our all-solid-state battery cells and sulfide-based solid electrolytes and future product candidates, which would have a material adverse effect on our brand, business, prospects and operating results. Any insurance coverage might not be sufficient to cover all potential product liability claims. Any lawsuit seeking significant monetary damages either in excess of our coverage, or outside of our coverage, may have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business and financial condition. We may not be able to secure additional product liability insurance coverage on commercially acceptable terms or at reasonable costs when needed, particularly if we do face liability for our products and are forced to make a claim under then-existing policies.

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation, regulatory actions or government investigations and inquiries, which could have an adverse impact on our profitability and consolidated financial position.

We may be involved in a variety of litigation, other claims, suits, regulatory actions or government investigations and inquiries and commercial or contractual disputes that, from time to time, are significant. In addition, from time to time, we may also be involved in legal proceedings and investigations arising in the normal course of business including, without limitation, commercial or contractual disputes, including warranty claims and other disputes with potential customers, former employees and suppliers, intellectual property matters, personal injury claims, environmental issues, tax matters, and employment matters. It is difficult to predict the outcome or ultimate financial exposure, if any, represented by these matters, and there can be no assurance that any such exposure will not be material. Such claims may also negatively affect our reputation.

We are subject to substantial regulation, and unfavorable changes to, or failure by us to comply with, these regulations could substantially harm our business and operating results.

The sale of electric vehicles, and motor vehicles in general, is subject to substantial regulation under international, federal, state and local laws, including export control laws and other international trade regulations, which are continuously evolving as technology develops and becomes more widely adopted. We anticipate that our all-solid-state battery cells and sulfide-based solid electrolytes also would be subject to these regulations, and we expect to incur significant costs in complying with these regulations.

The U.S. government has made and continues to make significant changes in U.S. trade policy and has taken certain actions that could negatively impact U.S. trade, including imposing tariffs on certain goods

 

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imported into the United States, increasing scrutiny on foreign direct investment, and modifying export control laws applicable to certain technologies. In retaliation, other countries have implemented, and continue to evaluate, imposing additional trade controls on a wide range of American products and companies. The U.S. or foreign governments may take additional administrative, legislative, or regulatory action that could materially interfere with our ability to source and procure the raw materials we need for our research and development activities and, in the future, to sell products in certain countries. Sustained uncertainty about, or worsening of, current global economic conditions and further escalation of trade tensions between the United States and its trading partners could result in a global economic slowdown and long-term changes to global trade. Any alterations to our business strategy or operations made in order to adapt to or comply with any such changes could be time-consuming and expensive, and certain of our competitors may be better suited to withstand or react to these changes.

To the extent the laws change, our products may not comply with applicable international, federal, state or local laws, which would have an adverse effect on our business. Compliance with changing regulations could be burdensome, time consuming, and expensive. To the extent compliance with new regulations is cost prohibitive, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results would be adversely affected.

Internationally, there may be laws in jurisdictions we have not yet entered or laws we are unaware of in jurisdictions we have entered that may restrict our sales or other business practices. The laws in this area can be complex, difficult to interpret and may change over time. Continued regulatory limitations and other obstacles that may interfere with our ability to commercialize our products could have a negative and material impact on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Our technology and our website, systems, and data we maintain may be subject to intentional disruption, other security incidents, or alleged violations of laws, regulations, or other obligations relating to data handling that could result in liability and adversely impact our reputation and future sales. We may be required to expend significant resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures to detect, investigate and remediate vulnerabilities to security incidents, including measures impacting our ability to develop and maintain a supply chain. In addition, we will be required to comply with rapidly evolving laws and regulations legislation in this area. Any future failure by us to comply with applicable cybersecurity or data privacy legislation or regulation could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operations or financial condition.

We expect to face significant challenges with respect to information security and maintaining the security and integrity of our systems and other systems used in our business, as well as with respect to the data stored on or processed by these systems. We also anticipate receiving and storing confidential business information of our partners and customers. Advances in technology, an increased level of sophistication and expertise of hackers, and new discoveries in the field of cryptography can result in a compromise or breach of the systems used in our business or of security measures used in our business to protect confidential information, personal information, and other data. We may be a target for attacks designed to disrupt our operations or to attempt to gain access to our systems or to data that we possess, including proprietary information that we obtain from our partners pursuant to our JDAs with them. We also are at risk for interruptions, outages and breaches of our and our outsourced service providers’ operational systems and security systems, our integrated software and technology, and data that we or our third-party service providers process or possess. These may be caused by, among other causes, physical theft, viruses or other malicious code, denial or degradation of service attacks, ransomware, social engineering schemes, and insider theft or misuse.

The availability and effectiveness of our all-solid-state battery cell technology and our ability to conduct our business and operations depend on the continued operation of information technology and communications systems, some of which we have yet to develop or otherwise obtain the ability to use. Systems we currently use or may use in the future in conducting our business, including data centers and other information technology systems, will be vulnerable to damage or interruption. Such systems could also be

 

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subject to break-ins, sabotage and intentional acts of vandalism, as well as disruptions and security incidents as a result of non-technical issues, including intentional or inadvertent acts or omissions by employees, service providers, or others. We currently use, and may use in the future, outsourced service providers to help provide certain services, and any such outsourced service providers face similar security and system disruption risks as us. Our ability to monitor our outsourced service providers’ security measures is limited, and, in any event, third parties may be able to circumvent those security measures, resulting in the unauthorized access to, misuse, acquisition, disclosure, loss, alteration, or destruction of personal, confidential, or other data, including data relating to individuals. Some of the systems used in our business will not be fully redundant, and our disaster recovery planning cannot account for all eventualities. Any data security incidents or other disruptions to any data centers or other systems used in our business could result in lengthy interruptions in our service and may adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition, reputation and operating results.

Significant capital and other resources may be required in efforts to protect against information security breaches, security incidents, and system disruptions, or to alleviate problems caused by actual or suspected information security breaches and other data security incidents and system disruptions. The resources required may increase over time as the methods used by hackers and others engaged in online criminal activities and otherwise seeking to obtain unauthorized access to systems or data, and to disrupt systems, are increasingly sophisticated and constantly evolving. In particular, ransomware attacks have become more prevalent in the industrial sector, which could materially and adversely affect our ability to operate and may result in significant expense.

In addition, we may face increased compliance burdens regarding such requirements with regulators and customers regarding our products and services and also incur additional costs for oversight and monitoring of our supply chain. These additional compliance and logistical burdens are attenuated through our international partnerships. We also cannot be certain that these systems, networks, and other infrastructure or technology upon which we rely, including those of our third-party suppliers or service providers, will be effectively implemented, maintained or expanded as planned, or will be free from bugs, defects, errors, vulnerabilities, viruses, or malicious code. We may be required to expend significant resources to make corrections or to remediate issues that are identified or to find alternative sources.

Any failure or perceived failure by us or our service providers to prevent information security breaches or other security incidents or system disruptions, or any compromise of security that results in or is perceived or reported to result in unauthorized access to, or loss, theft, alteration, release or transfer of, our information, or any personal information, confidential information, or other data could result in loss or theft of proprietary or sensitive data and intellectual property, could harm our reputation and competitive position and could expose us to legal claims, regulatory investigations and proceedings, and fines, penalties, and other liability. Any such actual or perceived security breach, security incident or disruption could also divert the efforts of our technical and management personnel and could require us to incur significant costs and operational consequences in connection with investigating, remediating, eliminating and putting in place additional tools, devices, policies, and other measures designed to prevent actual or perceived security breaches and other incidents and system disruptions. Moreover, we could be required or otherwise find it appropriate to expend significant capital and other resources to respond to, notify third parties of, and otherwise address the incident or breach and its root cause, and most jurisdictions have enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals, regulatory authorities and others of security breaches involving certain types of data.

Further, we cannot assure that any limitations of liability provisions in our current or future contracts that may be applicable would be enforceable or adequate or would otherwise protect us from any liabilities or damages with respect to any particular claim relating to a security breach or other security-related matter. We also cannot be sure that our existing insurance coverage will continue to be available on acceptable terms or will be available in sufficient amounts to cover claims related to a security breach or incident, or that the insurer will not deny coverage as to any future claim. The successful assertion of claims against us that exceed available insurance coverage, or the occurrence of changes in our insurance policies, including premium increases or the imposition of large deductible or co-insurance requirements, could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our financial condition, operating results, and reputation.

 

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Additionally, laws, regulations, and other actual and potential obligations relating to privacy, data hosting and transparency of data, data protection, and data security are evolving rapidly, and we expect to potentially be subject to new laws and regulations, or new interpretations of laws and regulations, in the future in various jurisdictions. These laws, regulations, and other obligations, and changes in their interpretation, could require us to modify our operations and practices, restrict our activities, and increase our costs. Further, these laws, regulations, and other obligations are complex and evolving rapidly, and we cannot provide assurance that we will not claims, allegations, or other proceedings related to actual or alleged obligations relating to privacy, data protection, or data security. It is possible that these laws, regulations, and other obligations may be inconsistent with one another or be interpreted or asserted to be inconsistent with our business or practices. We anticipate needing to dedicate substantial resources to comply with laws, regulations, and other obligations relating to privacy and cybersecurity in order to comply. Any failure or alleged or perceived failure to comply with any applicable laws, regulations, or other obligations relating to privacy, data protection, or data security could also result in regulatory investigations and proceedings, and misuse of or failure to secure data relating to individuals could also result in claims and proceedings against us by governmental entities or others, penalties and other liability, and damage to our reputation and credibility, and could have a negative impact on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

We are subject to various existing and future environmental health and safety laws, which may result in increased compliance costs or additional operating costs and restrictions. Failure to comply with such laws and regulations may result in substantial fines or other limitations that could adversely impact our financial results or operations.

Our company and our operations, as well as our contractors, suppliers, and customers, are subject to numerous federal, state, local and foreign environmental laws and regulations governing, among other things, the generation, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes. We are also subject to a variety of product stewardship and manufacturer responsibility laws and regulations, primarily relating to the collection, reuse and recycling of electronic waste, as well as regulations regarding the hazardous material contents of electronic product components and product packaging, and non-hazardous wastes. We or others in our supply chain may be required to obtain permits and comply with procedures that impose various restrictions and operations that could have adverse effects on our operations. If key permits and approvals cannot be obtained on acceptable terms, or if other operations requirements cannot be met in a manner satisfactory for our operations or on a timeline that meets our commercial obligations, it may adversely impact our business. There are also significant capital, operating and other costs associated with compliance with these environmental laws and regulations.

Environmental and health and safety laws and regulations are subject to change and may become more stringent in the future, such as through new regulations enacted at the supranational, national, sub-national, and/or local level or new or modified regulations that may be implemented under existing law. The nature and extent of any changes in these laws, rules, regulations, and permits may be unpredictable and may have material effects on our business. Future legislation and regulations or changes in existing legislation and regulations, or interpretations thereof, could cause additional expenditures, restrictions, and delays in connection with our operations as well as our other future projects, or may require us to manufacture with alternative technologies and materials.

Our manufacturing process creates regulated air emissions which are typically managed within established permit limits by available emissions control technology. Should permitted limits or other requirements change in the future, the company may be required to install additional, more costly control technology. If we were to violate any such permit or related permit conditions, we may incur significant fines and penalties.

We rely on third parties to ensure compliance with certain environmental laws, including those relating to the disposal of wastes. Any failure to properly handle or dispose of wastes, regardless of whether such failure is ours or our contractors, may result in liability under environmental laws, as well as liability for any impacts to

 

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human health or natural resources. The costs of liability with respect to contamination could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. Additionally, we may not be able to secure contracts with third parties and contractors to continue their key supply chain and disposal services for our business, which may result in increased costs for compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

Our research and development activities expose our employees to potential occupational hazards such as, but not limited to, the presence of hazardous materials, machines with moving parts, and high voltage and/or high current electrical systems typical of large manufacturing equipment and related safety incidents. There may be safety incidents that damage machinery or product, slow or stop production, or harm employees. Employees may be exposed to toxic hydrogen sulfide as a result of the components we use being exposed to moisture. If released in an uncontrolled manner, this hydrogen sulfide can create hazardous working conditions. Consequences may include litigation, fines, increased insurance premiums, mandates to temporarily halt production, workers’ compensation claims, or other actions that impact our brand, finances, or ability to operate.

Some of our operations involve the manufacture and/or handling of a variety of explosive and flammable materials. We might experience incidents such as leaks and ruptures, explosions, fires, transportation accidents involving our chemical products, chemical spills and other discharges or releases of toxic or hazardous substances or gases and environmental hazards in the future or that these incidents will not result in production delays or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations, for which we may not be adequately insured.

We rely on government contracts and grants for a significant portion of our revenue and to partially fund our research and development activities, which are subject to a number of uncertainties, challenges, and risks.

We currently rely on government contracts and grants for a significant portion of our revenue and to partially fund our research and development activities. Contracts and grants with government entities are subject to a number of risks. Obtaining grant funding and selling to government entities can be highly competitive, expensive, and time consuming, often requiring significant upfront time and expense without any assurance that we will be successful. In the event that we are successful in being awarded a government contract or grant, such award may be subject to appeals, disputes, or litigation, including, but not limited to, bid protests by unsuccessful bidders. Availability of government funding for our solutions may be impacted by public sector budgetary cycles and funding authorizations, with funding reductions or delays adversely affecting public sector demand for our solutions. Where government funds are used, the government may require all work to be performed in and/or certain products to be manufactured in the United States, and we may not manufacture all products in locations that meet government requirements, and as a result, our business and results of operations may suffer. Contracts with governmental entities may also include preferential pricing terms, including, but not limited to, “most favored customer” pricing and obligations to disclose aspects of how our pricing is developed. Additionally, we may be required to obtain special certifications to sell some or all of our solutions to government or quasi-government entities. Such certification requirements for our solutions may change, thereby restricting our ability to sell into the federal government sector until we have obtained such certification. If our products are late in achieving or fail to achieve compliance with these certifications and standards, or our competitors achieve compliance with these certifications and standards, we may be disqualified from selling our products to such governmental entities, or be at a competitive disadvantage, which would harm our business, results of operations, and financial condition. There are no assurances that we will find the terms for obtaining such certifications to be acceptable or that we will be successful in obtaining or maintaining the certifications.

As a government contractor or subcontractor, we must comply with laws, regulations, and contractual provisions relating to the formation, administration, and performance of government contracts and grants and inclusion on government contract vehicles, which affect how we and our partners do business with government agencies. Government contracts often contain provisions and are subject to laws and regulations that provide government customers with additional rights and remedies not typically found in commercial contracts. These rights and remedies allow government customers, among other things, to terminate existing contracts for

 

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convenience and/or with short notice and without cause, and whether a government contract or grant might be terminated by the government under such a provision is outside of our control and could adversely affect our revenue. As a result of actual or perceived noncompliance with government contracting laws, regulations, or contractual provisions, we may be subject to non-ordinary course audits and internal investigations which may prove costly to our business financially, divert management time, or limit our ability to continue selling our products and services to our government customers. These laws and regulations may impose other added costs on our business, and failure to comply with these or other applicable regulations and requirements, including non-compliance in the past, could lead to claims for damages from our partners, downward contract price adjustments or refund obligations, civil or criminal penalties, and termination of contracts and suspension or debarment from obtaining government contracts and grants for a period of time with government agencies. Any such damages, penalties, disruption, or limitation in our ability to do business with a government could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, public perception and growth prospects.

We are subject to multiple environmental permitting processes at the national, sub-national, and/or local level. Failure to obtain key permits and approvals may adversely impact our business.

Our facilities are subject to local, state and federal siting and environmental permitting requirements. Permitting agencies with discretionary authority may refuse to issue required permits, forcing consideration of alternative sites, or may impose costly permit conditions. Such actions could increase the cost, or lengthen the timeline, of developing additional manufacturing facilities.

Even if we successfully navigate our way through the permitting phases, future conflicts may arise in the course of our development activities, including restrictions on our actions due to new or evolving environmental legislation, changes in permitted uses and conflicts with non-governmental organizations regarding the use of land for our manufacturing facilities. If such conflicts arise, we may be delayed or prevented from building our research and development and manufacturing facilities, which could have a negative impact on our financial condition, prospects, and results of operations.

We are subject to anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws and anti-money laundering laws, and non-compliance with such laws can subject us to administrative, civil and criminal fines and penalties, collateral consequences, remedial measures and legal expenses, all of which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation.

We are subject to the FCPA, the U.S. domestic bribery statute contained in 18 U.S.C. § 201, the U.S. Travel Act, and possibly other anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws and anti-money laundering laws in various jurisdictions in which we conduct, or in the future may conduct, activities. Anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws have been enforced aggressively in recent years and are interpreted broadly to generally prohibit us and our officers, directors, employees, business partners agents, representatives and third-party intermediaries from corruptly offering, promising, authorizing or providing, directly or indirectly anything of value to recipients in the public or private sector.

We may leverage third parties to sell our products and conduct our business abroad. We, our officers, directors, employees, business partners agents, representatives and third-party intermediaries may have direct or indirect interactions with officials and employees of government agencies or state-owned or affiliated entities and may be held liable for the corrupt or other illegal activities of these employees, agents, representatives, business partners or third-party intermediaries even if we do not explicitly authorize such activities. We cannot assure you that all of our officers, directors, employees, business partners agents, representatives and third-party intermediaries will not take actions in violation of applicable law, for which we may be ultimately held responsible. If we conduct international sales and business, our risks under these laws may increase.

These laws also require companies to make and keep books, records and accounts that accurately reflect transactions and dispositions of assets and to maintain a system of adequate internal accounting controls

 

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and compliance procedures designed to prevent any such actions. While we have certain policies and procedures to address compliance with such laws, we cannot assure you that none of our officers, directors, employees, business partners agents, representatives and third-party intermediaries will take actions in violation of our policies and applicable law, for which we may be ultimately held responsible.

A violation of these laws or regulations could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation. Our policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with these regulations may not be sufficient and our directors, officers, employees, representatives, consultants, agents, and business partners could engage in improper conduct for which we may be held responsible.

Any allegations or violation of the FCPA or other applicable anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws and anti-money laundering laws could subject us to whistleblower complaints, adverse media coverage, investigations, settlements, prosecutions, enforcement actions, fines, damages, loss of export privileges, and severe administrative, civil and criminal sanctions, suspension or debarment from government contracts, collateral consequences, remedial measures and legal expenses, all of which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects, financial condition and reputation. Responding to any investigation or action will likely result in a materially significant diversion of management’s attention and resources and significant defense costs and other professional fees.

Risks Related to DCRC

The risks discussed herein have been identified by DCRC’s management based on an evaluation of the historical risks faced by Solid Power and relate to DCRC management’s current expectations as to future risks that may result from DCRC’s anticipated ownership of Solid Power. Unless the context otherwise requires, all references in this section to “we,” “us” or “our” refer to DCRC.

Risks Related to Our Business, Operations and Industry

The loss of senior management or technical personnel could adversely affect our ability to successfully effect the business combination and successfully operate the business thereafter.

Our ability to successfully effect the business combination is dependent upon the efforts of our key personnel. Although some of our key personnel may remain with New Solid Power in senior management or advisory positions following our business combination, it is likely that some or all of the management of Solid Power will remain in place. While we intend to closely scrutinize any individuals we engage after the business combination, we cannot assure you that our assessment of these individuals will prove to be correct. These individuals may be unfamiliar with the requirements of operating a company regulated by the SEC, which could cause us to have to expend time and resources helping them become familiar with such requirements. The loss of the services of our senior management or technical personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. DCRC will also be dependent, in part, upon Solid Power’s technical personnel in connection with operating the business following the business combination. A loss by Solid Power of its technical personnel could seriously harm DCRC’s business and results of operations.

There are inherent limitations in all control systems, and misstatements due to error or fraud that could seriously harm DCRC’s business may occur and not be detected.

DCRC’s management does not expect that DCRC’s internal and disclosure controls will prevent all possible error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. In addition, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefit of controls must be relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, an evaluation of controls can only provide reasonable assurance that all material control issues and instances of fraud, if any, in DCRC have been detected.

 

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These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Further, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons or by collusion of two or more persons. The design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. DCRC will also be dependent, in part, upon Solid Power’s internal controls. A failure of DCRC’s or Solid Power’s controls and procedures to detect error or fraud could seriously harm DCRC’s business and results of operations.

Cyber incidents or attacks directed at us could result in information theft, data corruption, operational disruption and/or financial loss.

We depend on digital technologies, including information systems, infrastructure and cloud applications and services, including those of third parties with which we may deal. Sophisticated and deliberate attacks on, or security breaches in, our systems or infrastructure, or the systems or infrastructure of third parties or the cloud, could lead to corruption or misappropriation of our assets, proprietary information and sensitive or confidential data. As an early-stage company without significant investments in data security protection, we may not be sufficiently protected against such occurrences. We may not have sufficient resources to adequately protect against, or to investigate and remediate any vulnerability to, cyber incidents. It is possible that any of these occurrences, or a combination of them, could have adverse consequences on our business and lead to financial loss. DCRC will also be dependent, in part, upon Solid Power’s information. A failure in the security of Solid Power’s information systems could seriously harm DCRC’s business and results of operations.

We have not registered the shares of Class A Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants under the Securities Act or any state securities laws, and such registration may not be in place when an investor desires to exercise warrants, thus precluding such investor from being able to exercise its warrants except on a cashless basis and potentially causing such warrants to expire worthless.

We have not registered the shares of Class A Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants under the Securities Act or any state securities laws. However, under the terms of the warrant agreement governing the terms of our warrants, we have agreed that as soon as practicable, but in no event later than 15 business days, after the closing of an Initial Business Combination, we will use our best efforts to file a registration statement under the Securities Act covering such shares. We will use our best efforts to cause the same to become effective, but in no event later than 60 business days after the Closing, and to maintain the effectiveness of such registration statement, and a current prospectus relating thereto, until the expiration of the warrants in accordance with the provisions of the warrant agreement. We cannot assure you that we will be able to do so if, for example, any facts or events arise which represent a fundamental change in the information set forth in the registration statement or prospectus, the financial statements contained or incorporated by reference therein are not current or correct or the SEC issues a stop order. If the shares issuable upon exercise of the warrants are not registered under the Securities Act, we will be required to permit holders to exercise their warrants on a cashless basis. However, no warrant will be exercisable for cash or on a cashless basis, and we will not be obligated to issue any shares to holders seeking to exercise their warrants, unless the issuance of the shares upon such exercise is registered or qualified under the securities laws of the state of the exercising holder, or an exemption from registration is available. Notwithstanding the above, if our Class A Common Stock is at the time of any exercise of a warrant not listed on a national securities exchange such that it satisfies the definition of a “covered security” under Section 18(b)(1) of the Securities Act, we may, at our option, require holders of public warrants who exercise their warrants to do so on a cashless basis in accordance with Section 3(a)(9) of the Securities Act and, in the event we so elect, we will not be required to file or maintain in effect a registration statement, but we will be required to use our best efforts to register or qualify the shares under applicable blue sky laws to the extent an exemption is not available. In no event will we be required to net cash settle any warrant, or issue securities or other compensation in exchange for the warrants in the event that we are unable to register or qualify the shares

 

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underlying the warrants under the Securities Act or applicable state securities laws. If the issuance of the shares upon exercise of the warrants is not so registered or qualified or exempt from registration or qualification, the holder of such warrant shall not be entitled to exercise such warrant and such warrant may have no value and expire worthless. In such event, holders who acquired their warrants as part of a purchase of units will have paid the full unit purchase price solely for the shares of Class A Common Stock included in the units. If and when the warrants become redeemable by us, we may exercise our redemption right even if we are unable to register or qualify the underlying shares of Class A Common Stock for sale under all applicable state securities laws.

Risks Related to DCRC and the Business Combination

Following the consummation of the business combination, New Solid Power’s sole material asset will be its direct equity interest in the Surviving Corporation and, accordingly, New Solid Power will be dependent upon distributions from the Surviving Corporation to pay taxes and cover its corporate and other overhead expenses and pay dividends, if any, on New Solid Power common stock.

New Solid Power will be a holding company and, subsequent to the completion of the business combination, will have no material assets other than its direct equity interest in the Surviving Corporation. New Solid Power will have no independent means of generating revenue. To the extent the Surviving Corporation has available cash, New Solid Power will cause the Surviving Corporation to make distributions of cash to pay taxes, cover New Solid Power’s corporate and other overhead expenses and pay dividends, if any, on New Solid Power common stock. To the extent that New Solid Power needs funds and the Surviving Corporation fails to generate sufficient cash flow to distribute funds to New Solid Power or is restricted from making such distributions or payments under applicable law or regulation or under the terms of its financing arrangements, or is otherwise unable to provide such funds, New Solid Power’s liquidity and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

Subsequent to the consummation of the business combination, we may be required to take write-downs or write-offs, restructuring and impairment or other charges that could have a significant negative effect on our financial condition, results of operations and stock price, which could cause you to lose some or all of your investment.

Although we have conducted due diligence on Solid Power, we cannot assure you that this diligence revealed all material issues that may be present in Solid Power, that it would be possible to uncover all material issues through a customary amount of due diligence, or that factors outside of our control will not later arise. As a result, we may be forced to later write-down or write-off assets, restructure our operations or incur impairment or other charges that could result in losses. Even if our due diligence successfully identifies certain risks, unexpected risks may arise and previously known risks may materialize in a manner not consistent with our preliminary risk analysis. Even though these charges may be non-cash items and may not have an immediate impact on our liquidity, the fact that we report charges of this nature could contribute to negative market perceptions about us following the completion of the business combination or our securities. In addition, charges of this nature may cause us to be unable to obtain future financing on favorable terms or at all. Accordingly, any stockholders who choose to remain stockholders following the business combination could suffer a reduction in the value of their shares. Such stockholders are unlikely to have a remedy for such reduction in value.

Our initial stockholders have agreed to vote in favor of the business combination, regardless of how our public stockholders vote.

Unlike many other blank check companies in which the founders agree to vote their founder shares in accordance with the majority of the votes cast by our public stockholders in connection with an Initial Business Combination, our initial stockholders have agreed to vote any shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock owned by them in favor of the business combination. As of the date hereof, our initial stockholders own shares equal to approximately 20% of our issued and outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock in the aggregate. Accordingly, it is more likely that the necessary stockholder approval will be received for the business combination than would be the case if the initial stockholders agreed to vote any shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock owned by them in accordance with the majority of the votes cast by our public stockholders.

 

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Our Sponsor, certain members of the DCRC Board and our officers have interests in the business combination that are different from or are in addition to other stockholders in recommending that stockholders vote in favor of approval of the Business Combination Proposal.

When considering the DCRC Board’s recommendation that our stockholders vote in favor of the approval of the Business Combination Proposal, our stockholders should be aware that our directors and officers have interests in the business combination that may be different from, or in addition to, the interests of our stockholders. These interests include:

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor and independent directors hold an aggregate of 6,666,667 private placement warrants that would expire worthless if a business combination is not consummated, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $28,333,335, based on the closing price of our public warrants of $4.25 per warrant on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $18,333,335;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor may convert any working capital loans that it may make to us into up to an additional 1,000,000 private placement warrants, at the price of $1.50 per warrant;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors have agreed not to redeem any of the shares of our common stock held by them in connection with a stockholder vote to approve the business combination;

 

   

the fact that our initial stockholders paid an aggregate of $25,000 for the Founder Shares and that such securities will have a significantly higher value at the time of the business combination, which if unrestricted and freely tradable would be valued at approximately $106,837,500, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting, resulting in a theoretical gain of $106,812,500;

 

   

the fact that certain of DCRC’s officers and directors collectively own, directly or indirectly, a material interest in our Sponsor;

 

   

the fact that affiliates of our Sponsor own an aggregate of 1,660,417 shares of Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock, which at the Exchange Ratio, would be exchanged for 5,292,247 shares of our Class A Common Stock at the Closing;

 

   

the anticipated appointment of each of Erik Anderson, a member of the DCRC Board and DCRC’s Chief Executive Officer, and Robert Tichio, a member of the DCRC Board, as a director on the New Solid Power Board in connection with the closing of the business combination;

 

   

if the Trust Account is liquidated, including in the event we are unable to complete an Initial Business Combination within the required time period, our Sponsor has agreed to indemnify us to ensure that the proceeds in the Trust Account are not reduced below $10.00 per public share, or such lesser amount per public share as is in the Trust Account on the liquidation date, by the claims of (a) any third party (other than our independent public accountants) for services rendered or products sold to us or (b) a prospective target business with which we have entered into an acquisition agreement, but only if such a third party or target business has not executed a waiver of all rights to seek access to the Trust Account;

 

   

the fact that our independent directors own an aggregate of 360,000 Founder Shares, which if unrestricted and freely tradeable would be valued at approximately $4,395,600, based on the closing price of our Class A Common Stock of $12.21 per share on October 29, 2021, the record date for the special meeting;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor will benefit from the completion of a business combination and may be incentivized to complete an acquisition of a less favorable target company or on terms less favorable to stockholders rather than liquidate;

 

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the fact that our Sponsor and its affiliates can earn a positive rate of return on their investment, even if other DCRC stockholders experience a negative rate of return in the post-business combination company;

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, such as identifying potential target businesses and performing due diligence on suitable business combinations; and

 

   

the fact that our Sponsor, officers and directors will lose their entire investment in us if an Initial Business Combination is not completed.

At the Closing, we anticipate that our Sponsor will own 6,367,353 private placement warrants and 8,390,000 shares of New Solid Power common stock. In addition, on October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. The note does not bear interest and is repayable in full upon consummation of an Initial Business Combination. If we do not complete an Initial Business Combination, the note will not be repaid and all amounts owed under it will be forgiven. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert all or a portion of the unpaid principal balance of the note into that number of warrants to purchase one share of Class A Common Stock equal to the principal amount of the note so converted divided by $1.50. The terms of these warrants will be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. The note is subject to customary events of default, the occurrence of which automatically trigger the unpaid principal balance of the note and all other sums payable with regard to the note becoming immediately due and payable.

Further, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, there has been no reimbursement to our Sponsor, officers or directors for any out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with activities on our behalf, and no such amounts have been incurred as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus. However, as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, an affiliate of our Sponsor has incurred approximately $4.1 million of expenses on DCRC’s behalf, of which approximately $3.0 million has been repaid by DCRC to the affiliate of our Sponsor. The balance will be repaid by DCRC at the Closing.

Investors in our Sponsor, each of which contributed capital to our Sponsor in exchange for Founder Shares and private placement warrants, include entities affiliated with certain of our non-independent directors and officers. Specifically, Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen, Robert Tichio and Peter Haskopoulos are each affiliated with Sponsor Manager, and Erik Anderson is affiliated with WRG, through which such DCRC directors and officers have an indirect economic interest in the private placement warrants and shares of New Solid Power common stock anticipated to be held by our Sponsor as of the completion of the business combination.

Our independent directors paid $1,028 in aggregate consideration for the 360,000 Founder Shares transferred to our independent directors by our Sponsor at the closing of our IPO. In addition, our independent directors purchased 299,314 private placement warrants at a price of $1.50 per warrant at the closing of our IPO.

 

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The table set forth below summarizes the interests of Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares along with (i) the total investment made in our Sponsor (or purchase price paid for the private placement warrants, in the case of our independent directors) by Sponsor Manager, WRG and our independent directors in exchange for their interests in the private placement warrants and Founder Shares and (ii) the value of such interests based on the closing price of the public warrants and Class A Common Stock as of October 29, 2021, all of which would be lost if an Initial Business Combination is not completed by us within the required time period:

 

Name of Holder

   DCRC
Position
   Total Purchase
Price / Capital
Contributions
     Number of
Private
Placement
Warrants
    Value of
Private
Placement
Warrants as
of October 29,
2021
     Number of
Founder
Shares
     Value of
Founder
Shares as of
October 29,
2021
 

Decarbonization Plus Acquisition Sponsor Manager III, LLC1

   N/A    $ 7,923,040        5,268,801 3    $ 22,392,4043        6,943,741      $ 84,783,078  

WRG DCRC Investors, LLC2

   N/A    $ 1,150,710        765,219     $ 3,252,181        1,008,759      $ 12,316,947  

James AC McDermott

   Director    $ 300,000        199,543     $ 848,058        240,000      $ 2,930,400  

Jennifer Aaker

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342        40,000      $ 488,400  

Jane Kearns

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342        40,000      $ 488,400  

Jeffrey Tepper

   Director    $ 50,000        33,257     $ 141,342        40,000      $ 488,400  

 

1

DCRC directors Pierre Lapeyre, Jr., David Leuschen and Robert Tichio and Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Secretary Peter Haskopoulos each have an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through Sponsor Manager.

2

DCRC Chief Executive Officer Erik Anderson has an indirect economic interest in our Sponsor through WRG.

3

On October 14, 2021, we issued an unsecured promissory note in the principal amount of $1,500,000 to our Sponsor. Upon the consummation of an Initial Business Combination, our Sponsor will have the option, but not the obligation, to convert the unpaid principal balance of the note into up to 1,000,000 warrants. The terms of these warrants would be identical to the terms of the private placement warrants. If these 1,000,000 warrants were issued and outstanding and unrestricted and freely tradable as of October 29, 2021, they would have been valued at $4,250,000 based on the closing price of the public warrants as of October 29, 2021.

In addition, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that we renounce our interest in any corporate opportunity offered to any director or officer unless such opportunity is expressly offered to such person solely in his or her capacity as a director or officer of our company and such opportunity is one we are legally and contractually permitted to undertake and would otherwise be reasonable for us to pursue. We do not believe, however, that this waiver of the corporate opportunities doctrine has materially affected our search for an acquisition target or will materially affect our ability to complete our business combination.

Our initial stockholders hold a significant number of shares of our common stock and our Sponsor holds a significant number of our warrants. They will lose their entire investment in us if we do not complete an Initial Business Combination.

Our Sponsor and our independent directors hold all of our 8,750,000 Founder Shares, representing 20% of the total outstanding shares upon completion of our IPO. The Founder Shares will be worthless if we do not complete an Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023. In addition, our Sponsor and independent directors hold an aggregate of 6,666,667 private placement warrants that will also be worthless if we do not complete an Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023.

The Founder Shares are identical to the shares of Class A Common Stock included in the units, except that (a) the Founder Share are subject to certain transfer restrictions, (b) our Sponsor, officers and directors have

 

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entered into a letter agreement with us, pursuant to which they have agreed (i) to waive their redemption rights with respect to their Founder Shares and public shares owned in connection with the completion of an Initial Business Combination, (ii) to waive their rights to liquidating distributions from the Trust Account with respect to their Founder Shares if we fail to complete an Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023 (although they will be entitled to liquidating distributions from the Trust Account with respect to any public shares they hold if we fail to complete an Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023) and (c) the 40,000 Founder Shares that are shares of our Class B Common Stock as of the date of this proxy statement/prospectus are automatically convertible into shares of our Class A Common Stock at the time of an Initial Business Combination, as described herein.

The personal and financial interests of our Sponsor, officers and directors may have influenced their motivation in identifying and selecting the business combination, completing the business combination and influencing our operation following the business combination.

We will incur significant transaction costs in connection with the business combination.

We have and expect to incur significant, non-recurring costs in connection with consummating the business combination. All expenses incurred in connection with the Business Combination Agreement and the business combination, including all legal, accounting, consulting, investment banking and other fees, expenses and costs, will be for the account of the party incurring such fees, expenses and costs. Our transaction expenses as a result of the business combination are currently estimated at approximately $40 million, including approximately $12.25 million in deferred underwriting discounts and commissions to the underwriters of our IPO.

We may be subject to business uncertainties while the business combination is pending.

Uncertainty about the effect of the business combination on employees and third parties may have an adverse effect on DCRC and Solid Power. These uncertainties may impair the ability to retain and motivate key personnel and could cause third parties that deal with Solid Power to defer entering into contracts or making other decisions or seek to change existing business relationships.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information included in this document may not be indicative of what our actual financial position or results of operations would have been.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information for DCRC following the business combination in this proxy statement/prospectus is presented for illustrative purposes only and is not necessarily indicative of what our actual financial position or results of operations would have been had the business combination been completed on the dates indicated. See the section entitled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” for more information.

We may waive one or more of the conditions to the business combination.

We may agree to waive, in whole or in part, one or more of the conditions to our obligations to complete the business combination, to the extent permitted by our Charter, bylaws and applicable laws. For example, it is a condition to our obligation to close the business combination that certain of Solid Power’s representations and warranties be true and correct to the standards applicable to such representations and warranties. However, if the DCRC Board determines that it is in the best interests of DCRC to proceed with the business combination, then the DCRC Board may elect to waive that condition and close the business combination.

 

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If we are unable to complete an Initial Business Combination on or prior to March 26, 2023, our public stockholders may receive only approximately $10.00 per share on the liquidation of our Trust Account (or less than $10.00 per share in certain circumstances where a third party brings a claim against us that our Sponsor is unable to indemnify), and our warrants will expire worthless.

If we are unable to complete an Initial Business Combination on or prior to March 26, 2023, our public stockholders may receive only approximately $10.00 per share on the liquidation of our Trust Account (or less than $10.00 per share in certain circumstances where a third party brings a claim against us that our Sponsor is unable to indemnify (as described below)), and our warrants will expire worthless.

If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in our Trust Account could be reduced and the per share redemption amount received by stockholders may be less than $10.00 per share.

Our placing of funds in the Trust Account may not protect those funds from third-party claims against us. Although we will seek to have all vendors, service providers (other than our independent public accountants), prospective target businesses and other entities with which we do business execute agreements with us waiving any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to any monies held in the Trust Account for the benefit of our public stockholders, such parties may not execute such agreements, or even if they execute such agreements, they may not be prevented from bringing claims against the Trust Account, including, but not limited to, fraudulent inducement, breach of fiduciary responsibility or other similar claims, as well as claims challenging the enforceability of the waiver, in each case in order to gain advantage with respect to a claim against our assets, including the funds held in the Trust Account. Although no third parties have refused to execute an agreement waiving such claims to the monies held in the Trust Account to date, if any third party refuses to execute such an agreement in the future, our management will perform an analysis of the alternatives available to it and will only enter into an agreement with a third party that has not executed a waiver if management believes that such third party’s engagement would be significantly more beneficial to us than any alternative. Making such a request of potential target businesses may make our acquisition proposal less attractive to them and, to the extent prospective target businesses refuse to execute such a waiver, it may limit the field of potential target businesses that we might pursue.

Examples of possible instances where we may engage a third party that refuses to execute a waiver include the engagement of a third-party consultant whose particular expertise or skills are believed by management to be significantly superior to those of other consultants that would agree to execute a waiver or in cases where management is unable to find a service provider willing to execute a waiver. In addition, there is no guarantee that such entities will agree to waive any claims they may have in the future as a result of, or arising out of, any negotiations, contracts or agreements with us and will not seek recourse against the Trust Account for any reason. Upon redemption of our public shares, if we are unable to complete our business combination within the prescribed timeframe, or upon the exercise of a redemption right in connection with our business combination, we will be required to provide for payment of claims of creditors that were not waived that may be brought against us within the ten years following redemption. Accordingly, the per-share redemption amount received by public stockholders could be less than the $10.00 per public share initially held in the Trust Account, due to claims of such creditors. Our Sponsor has agreed that it will be liable to us if and to the extent any claims by a third party (other than our independent public accountants) for services rendered or products sold to us, or a prospective target business with which we have entered an acquisition agreement, reduce the amount of funds in the Trust Account to below the lesser of (a) $10.00 per public share and (b) the actual amount per public share held in the Trust Account, if less than $10.00 per share due to reductions in the value of the trust assets as of the date of the liquidation of the Trust Account, in each case including interest earned on the funds held in the Trust Account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes, less franchise and income taxes payable, provided that such liability will not apply to any claims by a third party or prospective target business who executed a waiver of any and all rights to the monies held in the Trust Account (whether or not such waiver is enforceable) nor will it apply to any claims under our indemnity of the underwriters of our Initial Public Offering against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. However, we have not asked our

 

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Sponsor to reserve for such indemnification obligations, nor have we independently verified whether our Sponsor has sufficient funds to satisfy its indemnity obligations and we believe that our Sponsor’s only assets are securities of our company. Therefore, we cannot assure you that our Sponsor would be able to satisfy those obligations. As a result, if any such claims were successfully made against the Trust Account, the funds available for an Initial Business Combination and redemptions could be reduced to less than $10.00 per public share. In such event, we may not be able to complete an Initial Business Combination, and you would receive such lesser amount per share in connection with any redemption of your public shares. None of our officers or directors will indemnify us for claims by third parties including, without limitation, claims by vendors and prospective target businesses.

Our directors may decide not to enforce the indemnification obligations of our Sponsor, resulting in a reduction in the amount of funds in the Trust Account available for distribution to our public stockholders.

In the event that the proceeds in the Trust Account are reduced below the lesser of (a) $10.00 per public share and (b) the actual amount per public share held in the Trust Account as of the date of the liquidation of the Trust Account, if less than $10.00 per share due to reductions in the value of the trust assets, in each case including interest earned on the funds held in the Trust Account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes, less franchise and income taxes payable, and our Sponsor asserts that it is unable to satisfy its obligations or that it has no indemnification obligations related to a particular claim, our independent directors would determine whether to take legal action against our Sponsor to enforce its indemnification obligations.

While we currently expect that our independent directors would take legal action on our behalf against our Sponsor to enforce its indemnification obligations to us, it is possible that our independent directors in exercising their business judgment and subject to their fiduciary duties may choose not to do so in any particular instance. If our independent directors choose not to enforce these indemnification obligations, the amount of funds in the Trust Account available for distribution to our public stockholders may be reduced below $10.00 per share.

We may not have sufficient funds to satisfy indemnification claims of our directors and officers.

We have agreed to indemnify our officers and directors to the fullest extent permitted by law. However, our officers and directors have agreed, and any persons who may become officers or directors prior to an Initial Business Combination will agree, to waive any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to any monies in the Trust Account and to not seek recourse against the Trust Account for any reason whatsoever. Accordingly, any indemnification provided will be able to be satisfied by us only if (a) we have sufficient funds outside of the Trust Account or (b) we consummate an Initial Business Combination. Our obligation to indemnify our officers and directors may discourage stockholders from bringing a lawsuit against our officers or directors for breach of their fiduciary duty. These provisions also may have the effect of reducing the likelihood of derivative litigation against our officers and directors, even though such an action, if successful, might otherwise benefit us and our stockholders. Furthermore, a stockholder’s investment may be adversely affected to the extent we pay the costs of settlement and damage awards against our officers and directors pursuant to these indemnification provisions.

If, after we distribute the proceeds in the Trust Account to our public stockholders, we file a bankruptcy petition or an involuntary bankruptcy petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, a bankruptcy court may seek to recover such proceeds, and the members of the DCRC Board may be viewed as having breached their fiduciary duties to our creditors, thereby exposing the members of the DCRC Board and us to claims of punitive damages.

If, after we distribute the proceeds in the Trust Account to our public stockholders, we file a bankruptcy petition or an involuntary bankruptcy petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, any distributions received by stockholders could be viewed under applicable debtor/creditor and/or bankruptcy laws as either a “preferential transfer” or a “fraudulent conveyance.” As a result, a bankruptcy court could seek to recover some or all amounts received by our stockholders. In addition, the DCRC Board may be viewed as having breached its fiduciary duty

 

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to our creditors and/or having acted in bad faith, thereby exposing itself and us to claims of punitive damages, by paying public stockholders from the Trust Account prior to addressing the claims of creditors.

If, before distributing the proceeds in the Trust Account to our public stockholders, we file a bankruptcy petition or an involuntary bankruptcy petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, the claims of creditors in such proceeding may have priority over the claims of our stockholders and the per-share amount that would otherwise be received by our stockholders in connection with our liquidation may be reduced.

If, before distributing the proceeds in the Trust Account to our public stockholders, we file a bankruptcy petition or an involuntary bankruptcy petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, the proceeds held in the Trust Account could be subject to applicable bankruptcy law, and may be included in our bankruptcy estate and subject to the claims of third parties with priority over the claims of our stockholders. To the extent any bankruptcy claims deplete the Trust Account, the per-share amount that would otherwise be received by our stockholders in connection with our liquidation may be reduced.

Even if we consummate the business combination, there is no guarantee that the public warrants will be in the money at the time they become exercisable, and they may expire worthless.

The exercise price for our warrants is $11.50 per share of Class A Common Stock. There is no guarantee that the public warrants will be in the money following the time they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, and as such, the warrants may expire worthless.

We may amend the terms of the warrants in a manner that may be adverse to holders of public warrants with the approval by the holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding public warrants (or, if applicable, 65% of the then-outstanding public warrants and 65% of the then-outstanding private placement warrants, voting as separate classes). As a result, the exercise price of the warrants could be increased, the exercise period could be shortened and the number of shares of our Class A Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a warrant could be decreased, all without a holder’s approval.

Our warrants were issued in registered form under a warrant agreement between Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as warrant agent, and us. The warrant agreement provides that the terms of the warrants may be amended without the consent of any holder to cure any ambiguity or correct any defective provision, but requires the approval by the holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding public warrants to make any change that adversely affects the interests of the registered holders of public warrants. Accordingly, we may amend the terms of the public warrants in a manner adverse to a holder if holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding public warrants (or, if applicable, 65% of the then-outstanding public warrants and 65% of the then-outstanding private placement warrants, voting as separate classes) approve of such amendment. Although our ability to amend the terms of the public warrants with the consent of at least 50% of the then-outstanding public warrants (or, if applicable, 65% of the then-outstanding public warrants and 65% of the then-outstanding private placement warrants, voting as separate classes) is unlimited, examples of such amendments could be amendments to, among other things, increase the exercise price of the warrants, convert the warrants into cash or stock (at a ratio different than initially provided), shorten the exercise period or decrease the number of shares of our Class A Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a warrant.

We may redeem unexpired warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to warrantholders, thereby making their warrants worthless.

We have the ability to redeem outstanding warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.01 per warrant, provided that the last sales price of the Class A Common Stock has been at least $18.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within the 30 trading-day period ending on the third business day prior to the date on which we give notice of such redemption and provided certain other conditions are met. Redemption

 

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of the outstanding warrants could force warrantholders (i) to exercise their warrants and pay the exercise price therefor at a time when it may be disadvantageous for them to do so, (ii) to sell their warrants at the then-current market price when they might otherwise wish to hold their warrants or (iii) to accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding warrants are called for redemption, is likely to be substantially less than the market value of their warrants. None of the private placement warrants will be redeemable by DCRC so long as they are held by our Sponsor or its permitted transferees.

In addition, we have the ability to redeem the outstanding warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.10 per warrant if, among other things, the last sale price of the Class A Common Stock equals or exceeds $10.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) on the trading day prior to the date on which notice of the redemption is given. In such a case, the holders will be able to exercise their warrants prior to redemption for a number of shares of Class A Common Stock determined by reference to a make-whole table. The value received upon such exercise of the warrants (1) may be less than the value the holders would have received if they had exercised their warrants at a later time where the underlying share price is higher and (2) may not compensate the holders for the value of the warrants, including because the number of shares of Class A Common Stock that may be received in connection with such an exercise is capped at 0.361 shares of Class A Common Stock per whole warrant (subject to adjustment) irrespective of the remaining life of the warrants.

Because certain of our shares of Class A Common Stock and warrants currently trade as units consisting of one share of Class A Common Stock and one-third of one warrant, the units may be worth less than units of other blank check companies.

Each unit contains one-third of one warrant. Pursuant to the warrant agreement, no fractional warrants will be issued upon separation of the units, and only whole warrants will trade. This is different from other blank check companies similar to ours whose units include one share of common stock and one warrant to purchase one whole share. We have established the components of the units in this way in order to reduce the dilutive effect of the warrants upon completion of an Initial Business Combination since the warrants will be exercisable in the aggregate for one-third of the number of shares compared to units that each contain a whole warrant to purchase one share, thus making us, we believe, a more attractive merger partner for target businesses. Nevertheless, this unit structure may cause our units to be worth less than if they included a warrant to purchase one whole share.

Our warrants are accounted for as liabilities and the changes in value of our warrants could have a material effect on our financial results.

On April 12, 2021, the Acting Director of the Division of Corporation Finance and Acting Chief Accountant of the SEC together issued a statement regarding the accounting and reporting considerations for warrants issued by special purpose acquisition companies entitled “Staff Statement on Accounting and Reporting Considerations for Warrants Issued by Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”) (the “SEC Statement”), which focused on certain settlement terms and provisions related to certain tender offers following a business combination, which terms are similar to those contained in the warrant agreement governing our warrants. As a result of the SEC Statement, we reevaluated the accounting treatment of our 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants, and determined to classify the warrants as derivative liabilities measured at fair value, with changes in fair value each period reported in earnings.

As a result, included on our balance sheet as of June 30, 2021 contained elsewhere in this proxy statement/prospectus are derivative liabilities related to embedded features contained within our warrants. ASC 815 provides for the remeasurement of the fair value of such derivatives at each balance sheet date, with a resulting non-cash gain or loss related to the change in the fair value being recognized in earnings in the statement of operations. As a result of the recurring fair value measurement, our financial statements and results of operations may fluctuate quarterly, based on factors which are outside of our control. Due to the recurring fair value

 

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measurement, we expect that we will recognize non-cash gains or losses on our warrants each reporting period and that the amount of such gains or losses could be material.

We have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2021. If we are unable to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and materially and adversely affect our business and operating results.

Following the issuance of the SEC Statement, we reevaluated the accounting treatment of our 11,666,667 public warrants and 6,666,667 private placement warrants, and determined to classify the warrants as derivative liabilities measured at fair value, with changes in fair value each period reported in earnings. See “Our warrants are accounted for as liabilities and the changes in value of our warrants could have a material effect on our financial results.” As part of such process, we identified a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting.

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. We continue to evaluate steps to remediate the material weakness. These remediation measures may be time consuming and costly and there is no assurance that these initiatives will ultimately have the intended effects.

If we identify any new material weaknesses in the future, any such newly identified material weakness could limit our ability to prevent or detect a misstatement of our accounts or disclosures that could result in a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements. In such case, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports in addition to applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting and our stock price may decline as a result. We cannot assure you that the measures we have taken to date, or any measures we may take in the future, will be sufficient to avoid potential future material weaknesses.

The Nasdaq Global Select Market may delist our securities from trading on its exchange, which could limit investors’ ability to make transactions in our securities and subject us to additional trading restrictions.

We cannot assure you that our securities will be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market after the business combination. In connection with the business combination, we will be required to demonstrate compliance with the Nasdaq Global Select Market’s initial listing requirements, which are more rigorous than the Nasdaq Global Select Market’s continued listing requirements. For instance, our stock price would generally be required to be at least $4.00 per share. We cannot assure you that we will be able to meet those initial listing requirements at that time. Our eligibility for listing may depend on, among other things, the number of our shares that are redeemed.

If the Nasdaq Global Select Market delists our securities from trading on its exchange and we are not able to list our securities on another national securities exchange, we expect our securities could be quoted on an over-the-counter market. If this were to occur, we could face significant material adverse consequences, including:

 

   

potential termination of the Business Combination Agreement if our securities are not listed on another national exchange mutually agreed to by Solid Power;

 

   

a limited availability of market quotations for our securities;

 

   

reduced liquidity for our securities;

 

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a determination that our Class A Common Stock is a “penny stock” which will require brokers trading in our Class A Common Stock to adhere to more stringent rules and possibly result in a reduced level of trading activity in the secondary trading market for our securities;

 

   

a limited amount of news and analyst coverage; and

 

   

a decreased ability to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future.

The National Securities Markets Improvement Act of 1996, which is a federal statute, prevents or preempts the states from regulating the sale of certain securities, which are referred to as “covered securities.” Because our units, Class A Common Stock and public warrants are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market, our units, Class A Common Stock and public warrants qualify as covered securities. Although the states are preempted from regulating the sale of our securities, the federal statute does allow the states to investigate companies if there is a suspicion of fraud, and, if there is a finding of fraudulent activity, then the states can regulate or bar the sale of covered securities in a particular case. While we are not aware of a state having used these powers to prohibit or restrict the sale of securities issued by blank check companies, other than the state of Idaho, certain state securities regulators view blank check companies unfavorably and might use these powers, or threaten to use these powers, to hinder the sale of securities of blank check companies in their states. Further, if we were no longer listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, our securities would not be covered securities and we would be subject to regulation in each state in which we offer our securities.

The DCRC Board did not obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in determining whether or not to proceed with the business combination.

The DCRC Board did not obtain a third-party valuation or fairness opinion in connection with its determination to approve the business combination. DCRC’s officers and directors have substantial experience in evaluating the operating and financial merits of companies from a wide range of industries and concluded that their experience and backgrounds, together with the experience and sector expertise of DCRC’s advisors, enabled them to make the necessary analyses and determinations regarding the business combination. Accordingly, investors will be relying solely on the judgment of the DCRC Board in valuing Solid Power and assuming the risk that the DCRC Board may not have properly valued the business. The lack of a third-party valuation or fairness opinion may also lead an increased number of stockholders to vote against the proposed business combination or demand redemption of their shares for cash, which could potentially impact DCRC’s ability to consummate the business combination.

We cannot assure you that our diligence review has identified all material risks associated with the business combination, and you may be less protected as an investor from any material issues with respect to Solid Power’s business, including any material omissions or misstatements contained in the Registration Statement or this proxy statement/prospectus relating to the business combination than an investor in an initial public offering.

Before entering into the Business Combination Agreement, we performed a due diligence review of Solid Power and its business and operations; however, we cannot assure you that our due diligence review identified all material issues, and certain unexpected risks may arise and previously known risks may materialize in a manner not consistent with our preliminary risk analysis. Additionally, the scope of due diligence we have conducted in conjunction with the business combination may be different than would typically be conducted in the event Solid Power pursued an underwritten initial public offering. In a typical initial public offering, the underwriters of the offering conduct due diligence on the company to be taken public, and following the offering, the underwriters are subject to liability to private investors for any material misstatements or omissions in the registration statement. While potential investors in an initial public offering typically have a private right of action against the underwriters of the offering for any of these material misstatements or omissions, there are no underwriters of the Class A Common Stock that will be issued pursuant to the Registration Statement and thus no corresponding right of action is available to investors in the business combination for any material misstatements or omissions

 

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in the Registration Statement or this proxy statement/prospectus. Therefore, as an investor, you may be exposed to future losses, impairment charges, write-downs, write-offs or other charges that could have a significant negative effect on Solid Power’s financial condition, results of operations and the price of its securities, which could cause you to lose some or all of your investment without recourse against an underwriter that may have been available had Solid Power been taken public through an underwritten public offering.

A significant portion of our total outstanding shares are restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. This could cause the market price of our Class A Common Stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of Class A Common Stock in the public market could occur at any time. These sales, or the perception in the market that the holders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could reduce the market price of our Class A Common Stock. After the business combination (and assuming no redemptions by our public stockholders of public shares), our Sponsor, officers and directors and their affiliates will hold approximately 5.4% of our common stock, including the 8,750,000 shares of Class A Common Stock into which the Founder Shares have been or will be converted. Assuming a maximum redemption by our public stockholders of 24,500,000 of the public shares, our Sponsor, officers and directors and their affiliates will hold approximately 6.2% of our common stock including the 8,750,000 shares of Class A Common Stock into which the Founder Shares have been or will be converted. Pursuant to the terms of a letter agreement entered into at the time of the IPO, the Founder Shares (which will be converted into shares of Class A Common Stock at the Closing) may not be transferred until the earlier to occur of (a) one year after the Closing or (b) the date on which we complete a liquidation, merger, stock exchange or other similar transaction that results in all of our stockholders having the right to exchange their shares of common stock for cash, securities or other property. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the last sale price of our Class A Common Stock equals or exceeds $12.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within any 30 trading day period commencing at least 150 days after the Closing, the shares of Class A Common Stock into which the Founder Shares have been or will be converted will be released from these transfer restrictions. In connection with the Closing, the IPO Registration Rights Agreement will be amended and restated and DCRC and the Reg Rights Holders will enter into the A&R Registration Rights Agreement. Pursuant to the A&R Registration Rights Agreement, DCRC will agree that, within 30 days after the Closing, DCRC will file the Resale Registration Statement with the SEC (at DCRC’s sole cost and expense), and DCRC will use its reasonable best efforts to have the Resale Registration Statement declared effective as promptly as reasonably practicable after the filing thereof. In certain circumstances, the Reg Rights Holders can demand DCRC’s assistance with underwritten offerings and block trades, and the Reg Rights Holders will be entitled to certain piggyback registration rights. Further, under the Subscription Agreements, DCRC agreed that, within 30 calendar days after the Closing Date, DCRC will file with the SEC (at DCRC’s sole cost and expense) the PIPE Resale Registration Statement, and DCRC will use its commercially reasonable efforts to have the PIPE Resale Registration Statement declared effective as soon as practicable after the filing thereof.

For more information about the A&R Registration Rights Agreement and Subscription Agreements, see the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—A&R Registration Rights Agreement” and the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Related Documents—PIPE Financing.”

If the business combination’s benefits do not meet the expectations of investors, stockholders or financial analysts, the market price of our securities may decline.

If the benefits of the business combination do not meet the expectations of investors or securities analysts, the market price of our securities prior to the Closing may decline. The market values of our securities at the time of the business combination may vary significantly from their prices on the date the Business Combination Agreement was executed, the date of this proxy statement/prospectus or the date on which our stockholders vote on the business combination.

 

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In addition, following the business combination, fluctuations in the price of our securities could contribute to the loss of all or part of your investment. Prior to the business combination, trading in the shares of our Class A Common Stock has not been active. Accordingly, the valuation ascribed to our Class A Common Stock in the business combination may not be indicative of the price that will prevail in the trading market following the business combination. If an active market for our securities develops and continues, the trading price of our securities following the business combination could be volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. Any of the factors listed below could have a material adverse effect on your investment in our securities and our securities may trade at prices significantly below the price you paid for them. In such circumstances, the trading price of our securities may not recover and may experience a further decline.

Factors affecting the trading price of our securities following the business combination may include:

 

   

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly financial results or the quarterly financial results of companies perceived to be similar to us;

 

   

changes in the market’s expectations about our operating results;

 

   

success of competitors;

 

   

our operating results failing to meet the expectation of securities analysts or investors in a particular period;

 

   

changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts concerning New Solid Power or the market in general;

 

   

operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors deem comparable to us;

 

   

our ability to market new and enhanced products and technologies on a timely basis;

 

   

changes in laws and regulations affecting our business;

 

   

our ability to meet compliance requirements;

 

   

commencement of, or involvement in, litigation involving New Solid Power;

 

   

changes in our capital structure, such as future issuances of securities or the incurrence of additional debt;

 

   

the volume of shares of our common stock available for public sale;

 

   

any major change in the DCRC Board or management;

 

   

sales of substantial amounts of common stock by our directors, executive officers or significant stockholders or the perception that such sales could occur;

 

   

sales of shares of our Class A Common Stock by the PIPE Investors;

 

   

the volume of shares of our Class A Common Stock available for public sale, including as a result of the termination of the post-closing lock-up pursuant to the terms thereof; and

 

   

general economic and political conditions such as recessions, interest rates, fuel prices, international currency fluctuations and acts of war or terrorism.

Broad market and industry factors may materially harm the market price of our securities irrespective of our operating performance. The stock market in general and the Nasdaq Stock Market have experienced price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the particular companies affected. The trading prices and valuations of these stocks, and of our securities, may not be predictable. A loss of investor confidence in the market for retail stocks or the stocks of other companies which investors perceive to be similar to New Solid Power following the business combination could depress our stock

 

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price regardless of our business, prospects, financial conditions or results of operations. A decline in the market price of our securities also could adversely affect our ability to issue additional securities and our ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

Following the business combination, if securities or industry analysts do not publish or cease publishing research or reports about us, our business or our market, or if they change their recommendations regarding our common stock adversely, the price and trading volume of our common stock could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. If any of the analysts who may cover New Solid Power following the business combination change their recommendation regarding our stock adversely, or provide more favorable relative recommendations about our competitors, the price of our common stock would likely decline. If any analyst who may cover New Solid Power following the business combination were to cease their coverage or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

Our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates may elect to purchase public shares from public stockholders, which may influence the vote on the Business Combination Proposal and reduce the public “float” of our Class A Common Stock.

Our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates may purchase public shares in privately negotiated transactions or in the open market either prior to or following the completion of the business combination, although they are under no obligation to do so. There is no limit on the number of public shares our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates may purchase in such transactions, subject to compliance with applicable law and Nasdaq rules. Any such privately negotiated purchases may be effected at purchase prices that are in excess of the per share pro rata portion of the Trust Account. However, our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors and their respective affiliates have not consummated any such purchases or acquisitions, have no current commitments, plans or intentions to engage in such transactions and have not formulated any terms or conditions for any such transactions. None of the funds in the Trust Account will be used to purchase public shares in such transactions. None of our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates will make any such purchases when they are in possession of any material non-public information not disclosed to the seller of such public shares or during a restricted period under Regulation M under the Exchange Act. Such a purchase could include a contractual acknowledgement that such stockholder, although still the record holder of such public shares, is no longer the beneficial owner thereof and therefore agrees not to exercise its redemption rights, and could include a contractual provision that directs such stockholder to vote such shares in a manner directed by the purchaser.

In the event that our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates purchase shares in privately negotiated transactions from public stockholders who have already elected to exercise their redemption rights, such selling stockholders would be required to revoke their prior elections to redeem their shares.

The purpose of any such purchases of public shares could be to vote such shares in favor of the business combination and thereby increase the likelihood of obtaining stockholder approval of the business combination or to satisfy a closing condition in the Business Combination Agreement, where it appears that such requirement would otherwise not be met. Any such purchases of our public shares may result in the completion of the business combination that may not otherwise have been possible. Any such purchases will be reported pursuant to Section 13 and Section 16 of the Exchange Act to the extent the purchasers are subject to such reporting requirements.

In addition, if such purchases are made, the public “float” of our Class A Common Stock may be reduced and the number of beneficial holders of our securities may be reduced, which may make it difficult to maintain or

 

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obtain the quotation, listing or trading of our securities on a national securities exchange. See the section entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Potential Purchases of Public Shares” for a description of how our Sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or any of their respective affiliates will select which stockholders or warrantholders to purchase securities from in any private transaction.

We may be subject to legal proceedings in connection with the business combination, the outcomes of which would be uncertain, and may delay or prevent the completion of the business combination and adversely affect New Solid Power’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

DCRC has received demand letters, and may in the future receive additional demand letters or complaints, from purported stockholders of DCRC regarding certain actions taken in connection with the business combination and the adequacy of the Registration Statement, of which this proxy statement/prospectus forms a part. These demand letters or complaints may lead to litigation against DCRC or its directors and officers in connection with the business combination. Defending against any lawsuits could require DCRC to incur significant costs and draw the attention of DCRC’s management away from the business combination. Further, the defense or settlement of any lawsuit or claim that remains unresolved at the Closing may adversely affect New Solid Power’s business, financial condition and results of operations. Such legal proceedings could also delay or prevent the Closing from occurring within the contemplated timeframe.

Changes in laws or regulations, or a failure to comply with any laws or regulations, may adversely affect our business, investments and results of operations.

We are subject to laws and regulations enacted by national, regional and local governments. In particular, we are required to comply with certain SEC and other legal requirements. Compliance with, and monitoring of, applicable laws and regulations may be difficult, time consuming and costly. Those laws and regulations and their interpretation and application may also change from time to time and those changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, investments and results of operations. In addition, a failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, as interpreted and applied, could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our ability to negotiate and complete the business combination, and results of operations.

As a result of plans to expand New Solid Power’s business operations, including to jurisdictions in which tax laws may not be favorable, its obligations may change or fluctuate, become significantly more complex or become subject to greater risk of examination by taxing authorities, any of which could adversely affect New Solid Power’s after-tax profitability and financial results.

Our effective tax rates may fluctuate widely in the future, particularly if New Solid Power’s business expands domestically or internationally. Future effective tax rates could be affected by operating losses in jurisdictions where no tax benefit can be recorded under GAAP, changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities, or changes in tax laws. Factors that could materially affect our future effective tax rates include, but are not limited to: (a) changes in tax laws or the regulatory environment, (b) changes in accounting and tax standards or practices, (c) changes in the composition of operating income by tax jurisdiction and (d) pre-tax operating results of New Solid Power’s business.

Additionally, after the business combination, New Solid Power may be subject to significant income, withholding, and other tax obligations in the United States and may become subject to taxation in numerous additional U.S. state and local and non-U.S. jurisdictions with respect to income, operations and subsidiaries related to those jurisdictions. New Solid Power’s after-tax profitability and financial results could be subject to volatility or be affected by numerous factors, including (a) the availability of tax deductions, credits, exemptions, refunds and other benefits to reduce tax liabilities, (b) changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, if any, (c) the expected timing and amount of the release of any tax valuation allowances, (d) the tax treatment of stock-based compensation, (e) changes in the relative amount of earnings subject to tax in the various jurisdictions, (f) the potential business expansion into, or otherwise becoming subject to tax in, additional

 

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jurisdictions, (g) changes to existing intercompany structure (and any costs related thereto) and business operations, (h) the extent of intercompany transactions and the extent to which taxing authorities in relevant jurisdictions respect those intercompany transactions, and (i) the ability to structure business operations in an efficient and competitive manner. Outcomes from audits or examinations by taxing authorities could have an adverse effect on New Solid Power’s after-tax profitability and financial condition. Additionally, the IRS and several foreign tax authorities have increasingly focused attention on intercompany transfer pricing with respect to sales of products and services and the use of intangibles. Tax authorities could disagree with New Solid Power’s intercompany charges, cross-jurisdictional transfer pricing or other matters and assess additional taxes. If New Solid Power does not prevail in any such disagreements, New Solid Power’s profitability may be affected.

New Solid Power’s after-tax profitability and financial results may also be adversely affected by changes in relevant tax laws and tax rates, treaties, regulations, administrative practices and principles, judicial decisions and interpretations thereof, in each case, possibly with retroactive effect.

Our warrants and Founder Shares may have an adverse effect on the market price of our Class A Common Stock and make it more difficult to effectuate our business combination.

We issued warrants to purchase 11,666,667 shares of Class A Common Stock as part of the units. We also issued 6,666,667 private placement warrants, each exercisable to purchase one share of Class A Common Stock at $11.50 per share.

Our initial stockholders currently own an aggregate of 8,750,000 Founder Shares. In addition, our Sponsor may convert working capital loans made by our Sponsor to us into up to an additional 1,000,000 private placement warrants, at the price of $1.50 per warrant. Any issuance of a substantial number of additional shares of Class A Common Stock upon exercise of these warrants and conversion rights will increase the number of issued and outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock and reduce the value of the Class A Common Stock issued to complete the business combination. Therefore, our warrants and Founder Shares may make it more difficult to effectuate the business combination or increase the cost of acquiring Solid Power.

We do not have a specified maximum redemption threshold. The absence of such a redemption threshold may make it possible for us to complete the business combination even if a substantial majority of our stockholders do not agree.

Our Charter does not provide a specified maximum redemption threshold. Our Charter provides we will not redeem our Class A Common Stock in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our Initial Business Combination. However, our Charter will be amended and restated immediately prior to the business combination, such that such limitation will no longer apply, and we anticipate our Class A Common Stock will be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, which provides a separate exception from being subject to the “penny stock” rules. As a result, we may be able to complete the business combination even though a substantial majority of our public stockholders do not agree with the transaction and have redeemed their shares or have entered into privately negotiated agreements to sell their shares to our Sponsor, officers, directors, advisors or any of their respective affiliates. In the event the aggregate cash consideration we would be required to pay for all shares of Class A Common Stock that are validly submitted for redemption plus any amount required to satisfy cash conditions pursuant to the terms of the proposed business combination exceed the aggregate amount of cash available to us, we will not complete the business combination or redeem any shares, all shares of Class A Common Stock submitted for redemption will be returned to the holders thereof, and we instead may search for an alternate business combination.

 

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Risks Related to the Redemption

DCRC cannot be certain as to the number of shares of public stock that will be redeemed and the potential impact to public stockholders who do not elect to redeem their public stock.

There is no guarantee that a stockholder’s decision whether to redeem its shares for a pro rata portion of the Trust Account will put the stockholder in a better future economic position. We can give no assurance as to the price at which a stockholder may be able to sell its public shares in the future following the completion of the business combination or any alternative business combination. Redemptions of public shares and certain events following the consummation of the business combination may cause an increase or decrease in our stock price, and may result in a lower value realized now than a stockholder of DCRC might realize in the future had the stockholder not redeemed its shares. Similarly, if a stockholder does not redeem its shares, the stockholder will bear the risk of ownership of the public shares after the consummation of the business combination, and there can be no assurance that a stockholder can sell its shares in the future for a greater amount than the redemption price set forth in this proxy statement/prospectus. A stockholder should consult, and rely solely upon, the stockholder’s own tax and/or financial advisor for assistance on how this may affect his, her or its individual situation.

On                     , 2021, the most recent practicable date prior to the date of this proxy statement/prospectus, the closing price per share of the Class A Common Stock was $         . Public stockholders should be aware that, while we are unable to predict the price per share of New Solid Power’s common stock following the consummation of the business combination—and accordingly we are unable to predict the potential impact of redemptions on the per share value of public shares owned by non-redeeming stockholders—increased levels of redemptions by public stockholders may be a result of the price per share of the Class A Common Stock falling below the redemption price. We expect that more public stockholders may elect to redeem their public shares if the share price of the Class A Common Stock is below the projected redemption price of $10.00 per share, and we expect that more public stockholders may elect not to redeem their public shares if the share price of the Class A Common Stock is above the projected redemption price of $10.00 per share. Each public share that is redeemed will represent both (i) a reduction, equal to the amount of the redemption price, of the cash that will be available to DCRC from the Trust Account and (ii) a corresponding increase in each public stockholder’s pro rata ownership interest in New Solid Power following the consummation of the business combination.

If our stockholders fail to comply with the redemption requirements specified in this proxy statement/prospectus, they will not be entitled to redeem their shares of Class A Common Stock for a pro rata portion of the funds held in the Trust Account.

In order to exercise their redemption rights, holders of public shares are required to submit a request in writing and deliver their shares (either physically or electronically) to our transfer agent at least two business days prior to the special meeting. Stockholders electing to redeem their shares will receive their pro rata portion of the Trust Account, including interest not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes, calculated as of two business days prior to the anticipated consummation of the business combination. See the section entitled “Special Meeting of DCRC Stockholders—Redemption Rights” for additional information on how to exercise your redemption rights.

Stockholders who wish to redeem their shares for a pro rata portion of the Trust Account must comply with specific requirements for redemption that may make it more difficult for them to exercise their redemption rights prior to the deadline.

Public stockholders who wish to redeem their shares for a pro rata portion of the Trust Account must, among other things, as more fully described in the section entitled “Special Meeting of DCRC Stockholders—Redemption Rights,” tender their certificates to our transfer agent or deliver their shares to the transfer agent electronically through DTC prior to 5:00 p.m., Eastern time, on December 3, 2021. In order to obtain a physical stock certificate, a stockholder’s broker and/or clearing broker, DTC and our transfer agent will need to act to

 

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facilitate this request. It is our understanding that stockholders should generally allot at least two weeks to obtain physical certificates from the transfer agent. However, because we do not have any control over this process or over the brokers, it may take significantly longer than two weeks to obtain a physical stock certificate. If it takes longer than anticipated to obtain a physical certificate, stockholders who wish to redeem their shares may be unable to obtain physical certificates by the deadline for exercising their redemption rights and thus will be unable to redeem their shares.

In addition, holders of outstanding units of DCRC must separate the underlying public shares and public warrants prior to exercising redemption rights with respect to the public shares. If you hold units registered in your own name, you must deliver the certificate for such units or deliver such units electronically to Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company with written instructions to separate such units into public shares and public warrants. This must be completed far enough in advance to permit the mailing of the public share certificates or electronic delivery of the public shares back to you so that you may then exercise your redemption rights with respect to the public shares following the separation of such public shares from the units.

If a broker, dealer, commercial bank, trust company or other nominee holds your units, you must instruct such nominee to separate your units. Your nominee must send written instructions by facsimile to Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company. Such written instructions must include the number of units to be split and the nominee holding such units. Your nominee must also initiate electronically, using DTC’s DWAC system, a withdrawal of the relevant units and a deposit of the corresponding number of public shares and public warrants. This must be completed far enough in advance to permit your nominee to exercise your redemption rights with respect to the public shares following the separation of such public shares from the units. While this is typically done electronically on the same business day, you should allow at least one full business day to accomplish the separation. If you fail to cause your public shares to be separated in a timely manner, you will likely not be able to exercise your redemption rights.

If a public stockholder fails to receive notice of DCRC’s offer to redeem its public shares in connection with the business combination, or fails to comply with the procedures for tendering its shares, such shares may not be redeemed.

DCRC will comply with the proxy rules when conducting redemptions in connection with the business combination. Despite DCRC’s compliance with these rules, if a public stockholder fails to receive DCRC’s proxy materials, such stockholder may not become aware of the opportunity to redeem its shares. In addition, the proxy materials that DCRC will furnish to holders of its public shares in connection with the business combination will describe the various procedures that must be complied with in order to validly redeem public shares. In the event that a stockholder fails to comply with these or any other procedures, its shares may not be redeemed.

Whether a redemption of Class A Common Stock will be treated as a sale of such Class A Common Stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes will depend on a shareholder’s specific facts.

The U.S. federal income tax treatment of a redemption of Class A Common Stock will depend on whether the redemption qualifies as a sale of such Class A Common Stock under Section 302(a) of the Code, which will depend largely on the total number of shares of our stock treated as held by the stockholder electing to redeem Class A Common Stock (including any shares of stock constructively owned by the holder as a result of owning private placement warrants or public warrants or otherwise) relative to all shares of our stock outstanding both before and after the redemption. If such redemption is not treated as a sale of Class A Common Stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the redemption will instead be treated as a corporate distribution of cash from us. For more information about the U.S. federal income tax treatment of the redemption of Class A Common Stock, see the section below entitled “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Material U. S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of U.S. Holders” or “Proposal No. 1—The Business Combination Proposal—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of Non-U.S. Holders,” as applicable.

 

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If DCRC is unable to consummate the business combination or any other Initial Business Combination by March 26, 2023, the public stockholders may be forced to wait beyond such date before redemption from the Trust Account.

If DCRC is unable to consummate the business combination by March 26, 2023, DCRC will (a) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up, (b) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than ten business days thereafter, redeem the public shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the Trust Account, including interest earned on the funds held in the Trust Account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes (less up to $100,000 of net interest to pay dissolution expenses and net of taxes payable), divided by the number of then-outstanding public shares, which redemption will completely extinguish public stockholders’ rights as stockholders (including the right to receive further liquidating distributions, if any), subject to applicable law, and (c) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of DCRC’s remaining stockholders and the DCRC Board, dissolve and liquidate, subject in each case to DCRC’s obligations under Delaware law to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law.

General Risk Factors

The business combination or post-combination company may be materially adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition to the risks described above under “We have been, and may in the future be, adversely affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic,” our ability to consummate the business combination may be materially adversely affected due to significant governmental measures being implemented to contain the outbreak of COVID-19 or its impact, including travel restrictions, the shutdown of businesses and quarantines, among others, which may limit our ability to have meetings with potential investors or affect the ability of Solid Power’s personnel, vendors and service providers to negotiate and consummate the business combination in a timely manner. The extent to which COVID-19 impacts the business combination or the post-combination company will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 and the actions to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact, among others. If the disruptions posed by COVID-19 or other matters of global concern continue for an extensive period of time, our ability to consummate the business combination may be materially adversely affected. Additionally, if the financial markets or the overall economy are impacted for an extended period, the post-combination company’s results of operations, financial position and cash flows may be materially adversely affected.

Changes to applicable tax laws and regulations or exposure to additional income tax liabilities could affect New Solid Power’s business and future profitability.

New Solid Power will be a U.S. corporation and thus subject to U.S. corporate income tax on its worldwide income. Further, New Solid Power’s operations and customers will be located in the United States, and, as a result, New Solid Power will be subject to various U.S. federal, state and local taxes. U.S. federal, state and local and non-U.S. tax laws, policies, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be interpreted, changed, modified or applied adversely to New Solid Power and may have an adverse effect on its business and future profitability.

For example, several tax proposals have been set forth that would, if enacted, make significant changes to U.S. tax laws. Such proposals include an increase in the U.S. income tax rate applicable to corporations (such as New Solid Power) from 21% to 28%. Congress may consider, and could include, some or all of these proposals in connection with tax reform that may be undertaken. It is unclear whether these or similar changes will be enacted and, if enacted, how soon any such changes could take effect. The passage of any legislation as a result of these proposals and other similar changes in U.S. federal income tax laws could adversely affect New Solid Power’s business and future profitability.

 

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The JOBS Act permits “emerging growth companies” like us to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies.

We qualify as an “emerging growth company” as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the Securities Act, as modified by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). As such, we take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including (a) the exemption from the auditor attestation requirements with respect to internal control over financial reporting under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (b) the exemptions from say-on-pay, say-on-frequency and say-on-golden parachute voting requirements and (c) reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements. As a result, our stockholders may not have access to certain information they deem important. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of (a) the last day of the fiscal year (i) following March 26, 2026, the fifth anniversary of our IPO, (ii) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion (as adjusted for inflation pursuant to SEC rules from time to time) or (iii) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our Class A Common Stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our prior second fiscal quarter, and (b) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three year period.

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the exemption from complying with new or revised accounting standards provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act as long as we are an emerging growth company. An emerging growth company can therefore delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies, but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. We have elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of our financial statements with another public company which is neither an emerging growth company nor an emerging growth company which has opted out of using the extended transition period difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

We cannot predict if investors will find our Class A Common Stock less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Class A Common Stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our Class A Common Stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

We may issue additional common stock or preferred stock to complete the business combination or under an employee incentive plan after completion of the business combination. Any such issuances would dilute the interest of our stockholders and likely present other risks.

We may issue a substantial number of additional shares of common or preferred stock to complete the business combination or under an employee incentive plan after completion of the business combination. The issuance of additional shares of common or preferred stock:

 

   

potential termination of the Business Combination Agreement if our securities are not listed on another national exchange mutually agreed to by Solid Power;

 

   

may significantly dilute the equity interests of our investors;

 

   

may subordinate the rights of holders of common stock if preferred stock is issued with rights senior to those afforded our common stock;

 

   

could cause a change in control if a substantial number of shares of our common stock are issued, which may affect, among other things, our ability to use our net operating loss carry forwards, if any, and could result in the resignation or removal of our present officers and directors; and

 

   

may adversely affect prevailing market prices for our units, Class A Common Stock and/or warrants.

 

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Delaware law and provisions in the Proposed Second A&R Charter and New Solid Power bylaws might delay, discourage or prevent a change in control of New Solid Power or changes in New Solid Power’s management, thereby depressing the market price of New Solid Power’s common stock.

New Solid Power’s status as a Delaware corporation and the anti-takeover provisions of the DGCL may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control by prohibiting New Solid Power from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person became an interested stockholder, even if a change of control would be beneficial to New Solid Power’s existing stockholders. In addition, the Proposed Second A&R Charter and New Solid Power bylaws will contain provisions that may make the acquisition of New Solid Power more difficult or delay or prevent changes in control of New Solid Power’s management. Among other things, these provisions will:

 

   

provide advance notice procedures with regard to stockholder nominations of candidates for election as directors or other stockholder proposals to be brought before meetings of New Solid Power stockholders, which may preclude New Solid Power stockholders from bringing certain matters before the New Solid Power stockholders at an annual or special meeting;

 

   

provide the New Solid Power Board the ability to authorize issuance of preferred stock in one or more series, which makes it possible for the New Solid Power Board to issue, without New Solid Power’s stockholder’s approval, preferred stock with voting or other rights or preferences that could impede the success of any attempt to change control of New Solid Power and which may have the effect of deterring hostile takeovers or delaying changes in control or management of New Solid Power;

 

   

provide for the New Solid Power Board to be divided into three classes of directors, with each class as nearly equal in number as possible, serving staggered three-year terms;

 

   

a prohibition on stockholder action by written consent, which forces stockholder action to be taken at an annual or special meeting of our stockholders;

 

   

provide that certain provisions of the Proposed Second A&R Charter can only be amended or repealed by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 6623% in voting power of the outstanding shares of New Solid Power common stock entitled to vote thereon, voting together as a single class;

 

   

provide that certain provisions of New Solid Power’s bylaws can be altered or repealed by (a) the New Solid Power Board or (b) the New Solid Power stockholders upon the affirmative vote of 6623% of the voting power of the New Solid Power common stock outstanding and entitled to vote thereon, voting together as a single class;

 

   

only the Board of Directors (pursuant to a majority vote), the Chairperson of the Board of Directors, the President or the Chief Executive Officer may call a special meeting; and

 

   

the designation of Delaware and federal courts as the exclusive forum for certain disputes.

New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws will designate state courts within the State of Delaware as the exclusive forum for certain types of actions and proceedings that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could limit stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers, employees or agents.

New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws will provide that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, to the fullest extent permitted by law, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware (or, if the Court of Chancery does not have jurisdiction, another State court in Delaware or the federal district court for the District of Delaware) shall be the sole and exclusive forum for (a) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of New Solid Power, (b) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any director, stockholder, officer or other employee of New Solid Power to New Solid Power or New

 

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Solid Power’s stockholders, (c) any action arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL or New Solid Power’s certificate of incorporation or the bylaws (as either may be amended from time to time) or (d) any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine, except for, as to each of (a) through (d) above, any claim as to which such court determines that there is an indispensable party not subject to the jurisdiction of such court (and the indispensable party does not consent to the personal jurisdiction of such court within ten days following such determination), which is vested in the exclusive jurisdiction of a court or forum other than such court or for which such court does not have subject matter jurisdiction.

In addition, New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws will provide that, unless New Solid Power consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the federal district courts of the United States of America will be the sole and exclusive forum for the resolution of any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act against any person in connection with any offering of New Solid Power’s securities, including, without limitation and for the avoidance of doubt, any auditor, underwriter, expert, control person, or other defendant.

New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws will provide that the exclusive forum provision will be applicable to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. As a result, the exclusive forum provision will not apply to suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or any rule or regulation promulgated thereunder (in each case, as amended), or any other claim over which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction.

This choice of forum provision may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or any of our directors, officers, other employees or stockholders, which may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims, although our stockholders will not be deemed to have waived our compliance with federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder. Alternatively, if a court were to find the choice of forum provision contained in New Solid Power’s amended and restated bylaws to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Introduction

The following unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information of New Solid Power has been prepared in accordance with Article 11 of Regulation S-X (as amended by the final rule, Release No. 33-10786 “Amendments to Financial Disclosures about Acquired and Disposed Businesses”) and presents the combination of historical financial information of Solid Power and DCRC, adjusted to give effect to the business combination. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet as of June 30, 2021 combines the historical balance sheet of DCRC as of June 30, 2021 with the historical balance sheet of Solid Power as of June 30, 2021 on a pro forma basis as if the business combination and other events, summarized below, had been consummated on June 30, 2021.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 combine the historical statements of operations of DCRC and the historical statements of operations of Solid Power for such periods on a pro forma basis as if the business combination and other events, summarized below, had been consummated on January 1, 2020, the beginning of the earliest period presented. Since DCRC was incorporated on January 29, 2021, there is no statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2020 to include in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of operations for the year ended December 31 2020.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information was derived from and should be read in conjunction with the following items included elsewhere in this proxy statement/prospectus:

 

   

the accompanying notes to the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements;

 

   

the historical audited financial statements and accompanying notes of DCRC as of June 30, 2021 and for the period from January 29, 2021 (inception) to June 30, 2021;

 

   

the historical audited financial statements and accompanying notes of Solid Power as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020;

 

   

the historical unaudited financial statements and accompanying notes of Solid Power as of June 30, 2021 and for the six months ended June 30, 2021; and

 

   

other information relating to DCRC and Solid Power included in this proxy statement/prospectus, including the Business Combination Agreement and the description of certain terms thereof set forth under the section entitled “Proposal No. 1 – The Business Combination Proposal.”

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information should also be read together with the sections titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of DCRC,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Solid Power,” and other financial information included elsewhere in this proxy statement/prospectus.

Pursuant to the Charter, public stockholders are being offered the opportunity to redeem, upon the closing of the business combination, shares of Class A Common Stock then held by them for cash equal to their pro rata share of the aggregate amount on deposit (as of two business days prior to the Closing) in the Trust Account. For illustrative purposes, based on the fair value of cash and marketable securities held in the Trust Account as of June 30, 2021 of approximately $350.0 million, the estimated per share redemption price would have been approximately $10.00.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information has been prepared using the assumptions below:

 

   

Assuming No Redemptions: This presentation assumes that no public stockholders exercise redemption rights with respect to their Class A Common Stock.

 

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Assuming Maximum Redemptions: This presentation assumes public stockholders holding approximately 24.5 million shares of Class A Common Stock will exercise their redemption rights for their pro rata share (approximately $10.00 per share) of funds in the Trust Account. This scenario gives effect to public share redemptions for aggregate redemption payments of approximately $245 million. The Business Combination Agreement provides that the obligations of Solid Power to consummate the business combination are subject to the satisfaction or waiver at or prior to the Closing of, among other conditions, a condition that as of the Closing, after consummation of the PIPE Financing and distribution of the Trust Account pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, deducting all amounts to be paid pursuant to the exercise of redemption rights provided for in the Charter, DCRC shall have unrestricted cash on hand equal to or in excess of $300 million (without, for the avoidance of doubt, taking into account any transaction fees, costs and expenses paid or required to be paid in connection with the business combination or the PIPE Financing or any cash on hand of Solid Power). Furthermore, DCRC will only proceed with the business combination if it will have net tangible assets (as determined in accordance with Rule 3a51-1(g)(1) under the Exchange Act) of at least $5,000,001 unless the Class A Common Stock otherwise does not constitute “penny stock” as such term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 under the Exchange Act. Because we anticipate that the Class A Common Stock will be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market following the Closing, and such listing would mean that the Class A Common Stock would not constitute “penny stock” as such term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 under the Exchange Act, we do not anticipate the $5,000,001 net tangible asset threshold being applicable.

Notwithstanding the legal form of the business combination pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, under both the no redemption and maximum redemption scenarios, the business combination will be accounted for as a reverse recapitalization, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded, in accordance with GAAP. Under this method of accounting, DCRC is expected to be treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, for accounting purposes, the financial statements of New Solid Power will represent a continuation of the financial statements of Solid Power with the business combination treated as the equivalent of Solid Power issuing shares for the net assets of DCRC, accompanied by a recapitalization. Operations prior to the reverse recapitalization will be those of Solid Power. Solid Power has been determined to be the accounting acquirer based on evaluation of the following facts and circumstances:

 

   

the Historical Rollover Stockholders will hold a majority of the outstanding equity interests in New Solid Power in both assuming no redemptions and assuming maximum redemptions scenarios;

 

   

Solid Power’s existing management will comprise the management of New Solid Power;

 

   

Solid Power’s existing Board of Directors will constitute a majority of the New Solid Power Board following the business combination;

 

   

the operations of New Solid Power will represent the current operations of Solid Power; and

 

   

New Solid Power will assume Solid Power’s name and headquarters.

Description of the Business Combination

Pursuant to the terms of the Business Combination Agreement, and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, Merger Sub will merge with and into Solid Power, with Solid Power surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of DCRC. At the Effective Time, by virtue of the Merger and without any action on the part of DCRC, Merger Sub, Solid Power or the holders of any of Solid Power’s securities:

 

   

each share of Solid Power Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time (including shares of Solid Power Common Stock resulting from the Conversion, but excluding any Dissenting Shares) will be canceled and converted into the right to receive the number of shares of Class A Common Stock equal to the Exchange Ratio;

 

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all shares of Solid Power Common Stock held in treasury of Solid Power will be canceled without any conversion thereof and no payment or distribution will be made with respect to such Solid Power Common Stock;

 

   

each share of Merger Sub Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be converted into and exchanged for one validly issued, fully paid and nonassessable share of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Surviving Corporation;

 

   

each Solid Power Warrant (a) to the extent terminated, expired or exercised immediately prior to the Effective Time, either voluntarily prior to the Effective Time or in accordance with its terms in connection with the business combination, will no longer be deemed outstanding and any shares of Company Common Stock issuable in connection therewith shall be treated as described above and (b) to the extent outstanding and unexercised immediately prior to the Effective Time will automatically be converted into an Assumed Warrant to acquire a number of shares of Class A Common Stock equal to (i) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to the applicable Solid Power Warrant multiplied by (ii) the Exchange Ratio, rounding the resulting number down to the nearest whole number of shares of Class A Common Stock, at an adjusted price equal to (x) the per share exercise price for the shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to the applicable Solid Power Warrant, as in effect immediately prior to the Effective Time, divided by (y) the Exchange Ratio, rounding the resulting exercise price up to the nearest whole cent;

 

   

each Solid Power Option, whether or not exercisable and whether or not vested, outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be converted into an option to purchase a number of shares of Class A Common Stock (such option, an “Exchanged Option”) equal to the product (rounded down to the nearest whole number) of (x) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to such Solid Power Option immediately prior to the Effective Time and (y) the Exchange Ratio, at an exercise price per share (rounded up to the nearest whole cent) equal to (A) the exercise price per share of such Solid Power Option immediately prior to the Effective Time divided by (B) the Exchange Ratio; provided, however, that the exercise price and number of shares of Class A Common Stock shall be determined in a manner consistent with the requirements of Section 409A of the Code; provided, further, that in the case of any Exchanged Option to which Section 422 of the Code applies, the exercise price and the number of shares of Class A Common Stock purchasable pursuant to such option shall be determined in accordance with the foregoing, subject to such adjustments as are necessary in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 424(a) of the Code; and

 

   

each award of Solid Power Restricted Stock that is outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time will be released and extinguished in exchange for an award covering a number of Exchanged Restricted Stock equal to the product (rounded down to the nearest whole number) of (x) the number of shares of Solid Power Common Stock subject to such award of Solid Power Restricted Stock immediately prior to the Effective Time and (y) the Exchange Ratio.

In connection with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, on June 15, 2021, DCRC entered into separate Subscription Agreements with the New PIPE Investors, pursuant to which the New PIPE Investors agreed to purchase, and DCRC agreed to sell to the New PIPE Investors, an aggregate of 16,500,000 PIPE Shares for a purchase price of $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $165 million, in a private placement. On October 27, 2021, DCRC agreed to sell an additional 3,000,000 PIPE Shares, for the same purchase price of $10.00 per share, which resulted in the PIPE Financing subscriptions increasing by $30,000,000 and the aggregate subscriptions in the PIPE Financing being $195,000,000. The closing of the sale of the PIPE Shares pursuant to the Subscription Agreements is contingent upon, among other customary closing conditions, the concurrent consummation of the business combination.

 

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Assumptions and estimates underlying the unaudited pro forma adjustments set forth in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements are described in the accompanying notes. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements have been presented for illustrative purposes only and are not necessarily indicative of the operating results and financial position that would have been achieved had the business combination occurred on the dates indicated. Further, the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements do not purport to project the future operating results or financial position of New Solid Power following the completion of the business combination. The unaudited pro forma adjustments represent DCRC’s management’s estimates based on information available as of the date of these unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements and are subject to change as additional information becomes available and analyses are performed.

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED BALANCE SHEET

AS OF JUNE 30, 2021

(Dollar amounts in thousands)

 

    As of June 30,
2021
          As of June 30,
2021
          As of June 30,
2021
 
    DCRC
(Historical)
    Solid Power
(Historical)
    Additional Pro
Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming No
Redemption)
    Pro Forma
Combined (Assuming
No Redemptions
    Additional
Pro Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemption)
    Pro Forma
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemptions)
 

ASSETS

           

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ —       $ 120,334     $

 

195,000

350,005

(708

(40,000

(A) 

(B) 

)(C) 

)(D) 

  $ 624,631     $ (245,000 )(H)    $ 379,631  

Contract receivables

    —         386       —         386       —         386  

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

    561       301       —         862       —         862  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

    561       121,021       504,297       625,879       (245,000     380,879  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash equivalent held in trust account

    350,005       —         (350,005 )(B)      —         —         —    

Property and equipment—net

    —         11,173       —         11,173       —         11,173  

Intangible assets (net)

    412       329       —         741       —         741  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

  $ 350,978     $ 132,523     $ 154,292     $ 637,793       (245,000   $ 392,793  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

           

Accounts payable

    625       1,016       (625 )(C)      1,016       —         1,016  

Accrued compensation

    —         882       —         882       —         882  

Current portion of long-term debt

    —         1,235       —         1,235       —         1,235  

Other accrued liabilities

    83       987       (83 )(C)      987       —         987  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

    708       4,120       (708     4,120       —       $ 4,120  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt, net of current portion

    —         873       —         873       —         873  

Deferred underwriting fee payable

    12,250       —         (12,250 )(D)      —         —         —    

Warrant liabilities

    48,167       —         —         48,167       —         48,167  

Other long-term liabilities

    —         286       —         286         286  

Deferred taxes

    —         211       —         211         211  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

  $ 61,125     $ 5,490     $ (12,958   $ 53,657     $ —       $ 53,657  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Mezzanine Equity

           

Solid Power Series A-1 Preferred Stock

    —         250,150       (250,150 )(F)      —         —         —    

Solid Power Series B Preferred Stock

    —         213,213       (213,213 )(F)      —         —         —    

Class A Common stock subject to possible redemption

    350,000       —         (350,000 )(F)      —         —         —    

Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

           

Common Stock

    —         1       (1 )(F)      —         —         —    

Class A Common Stock

    —         —         2 (A)      16       (2 )(H)      14  
    —         —         13 (F)      —         —         —    
    —         —         1 (G)      —         —         —    

Class B Common Stock

    1       —         (1 )(G)      —         —         —    

Additional paid in capital

    —         —        

194,998

(26,746

(1,406

753,203

(A) 

)(D) 

)(E) 

(F) 

    920,049       (244,998 )(C)      675,051  

Accumulated deficit

    (60,148     (336,331    
60,148
(F) 
    (335,929     —         (335,929
        (1,004 )(D)       
        1,406 (E)       
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

    (60,147     (336,330     980,613       584,136       (245,000     339,136  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

  $ 350,978     $ 132,523     $ 154,292     $ 637,793     $ (245,000   $ 392,793  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

    For the Six Months Ended
June 30, 2021
          For the
Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2021
          For the
Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2021
 
Collaboration and support
revenue
  DCRC
(Historical)
    Solid
Power
(Historical)
    Pro Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming No
Redemptions)
    Pro Forma
Combined
(Assuming No
Redemptions)
    Additional
Pro Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemptions)
    Pro Forma
Combined
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemptions)
 

Commercial

  $ —         36     $ —       $ 36       —       $ 36  

Governmental

    —         1,005       —         1,005       —         1,005  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total collaboration and support revenue

    —         1,041       —         1,041       —         1,041  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

           

Research and development

    —         6,309       —         6,309       —         6,309  

Direct Costs

    —         1,055       —         1,055       —         1,055  

Marketing and sales

    —         1,090       —         1,090       —         1,090  

Finance and administrative

    2,082       2,929       (2,082 )(AA)      1,523       —         1,523  
        (1,406 )(BB)       
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

    2,082       11,383       (3,488     9,977       —         9,977  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Loss

    (2,082     (10,342     3,488       (8,936     —         (8,936
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Interest expense

    —         342       (263 )(CC)      79       —         79  

Offering costs allocated to warrant liabilities

    957       —         —         957       —         957  

Decrease in fair value of warrants

    21,166       —         —         21,166       —         21,166  

Loss from change in value of embedded derivative liability

    —         2,680       (2,680 )(DD)      —         —         —    

Contract termination loss

    —         3,100       (3,100 )(EE)      —         —         —    

Interest Income

    (5     (9     5 (FF)      (9     —         (9
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pretax Loss

    (24,200     (16,455     9,526       (31,129     —         (31,129
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income tax expense

    —         (41     —         (41     —         (41
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (24,200   $ (16,414   $ 9,526     $ (31,088     —         (31,088
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Deemed dividend related to Solid Power Series A-1 and Series B preferred stock

    —         219,782       (219,782 )(GG)      —         —         —    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Loss Attributable to Common Stockholders

  $ (24,200   $ (236,196   $ (229,308   $ (31,088     —         (31,088
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted net loss per common share

  $ (2.77   $ (29.74     $ (0.19     —       $ (0.22

Weighted average shares outstanding, basic and diluted

    8,750       7,943         165,908       —         141,408  

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

     For the Year
Ended December 31, 2020
          For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2020
           For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2020
 
Collaboration and
support revenue
   DCRC
(Historical)
     Solid Power
(Historical)
    Pro Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming
No
Redemptions
    Pro Forma
Combined
(Assuming No
Redemptions)
    Additional Pro
Forma
Adjustments
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemptions)
     Pro Forma
Combined
(Assuming
Maximum
Redemptions)
 

Commercial

     —        $ 906     $ —       $ 906       —        $ 906  

Governmental

     —          1,197       —         1,197       —          1,197  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total collaboration and support revenue

     —          2,103       —         2,103       —          2,103  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

              

Research and development

     —          9,594       —         9,594       —          9,594  

Direct Costs

     —          1,670       —         1,670       —          1,670  

Marketing and sales

     —          1,205       —         1,205       —          1,205  

Finance and administrative

     —          1,227       —         1,227       —          1,227  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     —          13,696       —         13,696       —          13,696  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating Loss

     —          (11,593     —         (11,593     —          (11,593
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest expense

     —          361       (164 )(HH)      197       —